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Old 02-05-2010, 05:42 PM   #1
speedboy98178
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Default Need some help with my 1988 Hurricane CBR1000F

I bought a front tire at a clearance oday only to find out the matching rear tire might be too fat for my bike. I hope there is some one here that tells me they have had success mounting a 150 60 zr 17 on the backside of their Hurricane. feel free to email me direct blakephillip@clearwire.net
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Old 02-05-2010, 06:19 PM   #2
Kenneth_Moore
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Do you really want to risk getting tossed on the pavement for the price of a tire? Use exactly the size Honda says to use and nothing else.
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Old 02-05-2010, 06:52 PM   #3
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Ken's right. The lawyers will tell you that the best bet is to stick with the mfg's recommended tire size.

You can usually go one size wider on the rim, but that will alter the handling of the bike. The bead may not seat exactly right and it will change the intended profile of the tire. I went one size up on my 1985 Honda Nighthawk (CB700SC) and lived to tell the tale. I didn't really ride "on the limit" on that bike.

There's no real need to have a matched front/rear tire set. My advice: buy the recommended tire. If you think you must have a wider tire to go faster, that's not exactly true. There's a bunch of people who tear around the track on Ninjas on skinny 130/60, no problems.
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Old 02-05-2010, 07:10 PM   #4
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I went with a skinnier tire on my front, the guy at the shop said its common among the wing owners to make it more manageble when feet are down. He was right and I couldt tell any difference in handling at speed, maybe I'm lucky.
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Old 02-05-2010, 07:15 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by A Star Ride View Post
I went with a skinnier tire on my front, the guy at the shop said its common among the wing owners to make it more manageble when feet are down. He was right and I couldt tell any difference in handling at speed, maybe I'm lucky.
The funny thing is that it is quite common to go up or down one or two sizes in bicycle tires. Riders do this intentionally to change the handling characteristics of the bicycles. I don't know why it's not as common in motorcycling. Fear of litigation?

I'd love to hear what the old salts (Seru, Sarnali, LR) have to say about this.
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Old 02-05-2010, 08:02 PM   #6
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Old 02-05-2010, 08:09 PM   #7
speedboy98178
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Default HUrricane

I wasnt concerned about going faster. I commute 200 miles every weekend for work on this bike. I am not racing. I am trying to save a couple bucks without jeopardizing myself or others. I got a pretty good deal on the Pilot and would like to match it with another radial tire. Unfortunatly there are no 140 80 zr 17 manufactured.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Sprocket View Post
Ken's right. The lawyers will tell you that the best bet is to stick with the mfg's recommended tire size.

You can usually go one size wider on the rim, but that will alter the handling of the bike. The bead may not seat exactly right and it will change the intended profile of the tire. I went one size up on my 1985 Honda Nighthawk (CB700SC) and lived to tell the tale. I didn't really ride "on the limit" on that bike.

There's no real need to have a matched front/rear tire set. My advice: buy the recommended tire. If you think you must have a wider tire to go faster, that's not exactly true. There's a bunch of people who tear around the track on Ninjas on skinny 130/60, no problems.
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Old 02-05-2010, 09:07 PM   #8
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Go with the 150, you'll be OK. IIRC the 1000 had a 4" or 4.5"-wide rear wheel (mem'ry?) - well within the range of the 150 tire (which BTW is the stock size on the '88 Honda HawkGT - and you find 160, 170, and even the occasional 180 [for looks] on them). I run 160s on all my Hawks.

150 will probably slow the handling a bit, depending on the profile of the tire you choose - just an FYI. You may be forced to ditch the inner-fender, or do a bit of judicious trimming (also, depending on the tire profile).

Stick with either Radials or Bias - don't mix them. I don't really condone mixing brands, either - but use your own judgement (as with anything one does outside the realm of "stock replacement" parts).
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Old 02-05-2010, 09:22 PM   #9
speedboy98178
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Default 1988 Hurricane

thanks I was starting to believe it was going to be ok too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by The_AirHawk View Post
Go with the 150, you'll be OK. IIRC the 1000 had a 4" or 4.5"-wide rear wheel - well within the range of the 150 tire (which BTW is the stock size on the '88 Honda HawkGT - and you find 160, 170, and even the occasional 180 [for looks] on them). I run 160s on all my Hawks.

150 will probably slow the handling a bit, depending on the profile of the tire you choose - just an FYI. You may be forced to ditch the inner-fender, or do a bit of judicious trimming (also, depending on the tire profile).

Stick with either Radials or Bias - don't mix them. I don't really condone mixing brands, either - but use your own judgement (as with anything one does outside the realm of "stock replacement" parts).
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Old 02-06-2010, 08:23 AM   #10
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Airhawk is correct you can always usually get away with one size fatter. As long as the swingarm will accept it, which it should. The hot set up for the roadracers is to run one size skinnier to get a bigger contact patch when leaned over. My bike asks for a 190, I run a 180.

You'll be fine.
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