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Old 01-31-2009, 10:02 AM   #1
TheFox
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Default Upgrading handling in H-D Touring Rig

Hey guys. I have a 2006 Road Glide and I'm probably going to replace the forks with a chrome unit while on spring break. I recally someone, I think Buz, saying that changing the fork oil to a heavier weight makes a big difference in the handling of the H-D touring frames.

Anyone want to chime in on this? Thanks in advance.
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Old 01-31-2009, 10:08 AM   #2
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Default Oh yeah, forgot to add...

I will also be putting new tires on. The stock Dunlops are still on from 2006 (I bought it used) and I had the back end come around on me one day when coming to a stop. I don't like the way the OEM's feel in the wet either. This doesn't surprise me since the Dunlops I had on my ST4s felt like ice skates, but that's another story.

Thinking of doing the Night Dragons from Pirelli, but I want to get 10k out of a set. Any advice?
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Old 01-31-2009, 10:24 AM   #3
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Bumping up the fork oil is a simple mod that made a nice difference. Stock is 10wt I believe. I went to 15. 20 is too stiff.

I've always stuck with the Dunlops. My wrench buddy has tried other tires on various customer bikes and he always goes back to the Dunlops. The newer ones are a dual compound I believe.

When the back end comes around just Lay 'er down!
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Old 01-31-2009, 10:25 AM   #4
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Thanks for the fork oil info Buz.

I would just ride out the tires, but I scored a pair of stock rims from an FLHX (take offs), with aftermarket floating rotors from H-D, for just over 200 bucks shipped on Ebay. I'm supposed to get them this upcoming week.

I'll think about what you said about the tires, but I don't think I've ever replaced a Dunlop and not had it be an upgrade. It sort of flies in the face of conventional wisdom to me. Maybe my tire feel complaint is because I'm just used to a more sporting bike with better feedback?

I'm going to fix up my bikes that are being neglected in my neighbor's garage over spring break. I wish the snow would go the hell away already.
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Old 01-31-2009, 10:56 AM   #5
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Thanks for the fork oil info Buz.

I would just ride out the tires, but I scored a pair of stock rims from an FLHX (take offs), with aftermarket floating rotors from H-D, for just over 200 bucks shipped on Ebay. I'm supposed to get them this upcoming week.

I'll think about what you said about the tires, but I don't think I've ever replaced a Dunlop and not had it be an upgrade. It sort of flies in the face of conventional wisdom to me. Maybe my tire feel complaint is because I'm just used to a more sporting bike with better feedback?

I'm going to fix up my bikes that are being neglected in my neighbor's garage over spring break. I wish the snow would go the hell away already.
I think I've got the Ferodo brakes pads which are grippier over stock. Also, get a hand pump and make sure your shocks have a little pressure in them. I keep about 5 psi when riding solo unloaded and bump it up to about 10 psi when loaded and or passenger.

You don't need to worry about "feel." The floorboards will sound the warning long before the tires start to slip.
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Old 01-31-2009, 11:29 AM   #6
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After the 14, is your wrist in shock on the Road Glide?
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Old 01-31-2009, 05:26 PM   #7
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After the 14, is your wrist in shock on the Road Glide?
Not really. the seating position did it more. It's just so much better on a long trip with the radio and highway pegs. I came to realize when I was on my Rt. 66 trip that it would have been more pleasurable on the Harley. That's what made me think about looking for one.

The Glide has really changed the way I ride and think motorcycles. I'm not trying to prove anything anymore. It's not about anything but enjoying myself. I don't read bike mags any more and I don't think about what my next bike will be. It did slow me down and that's a good thing. 80 feels right on this bike. On the ZX14, that was the end of first gear (not exaggerating). Best of all I don't have to act cool around those douchebags in Chicago with sport bikes, joe rocket jackets and gelled hair while their helmet sits on the passenger seat. I still don't understand the sport bike mafia. Weirdos.

It was nice having the 14 and it sucks it got stolen, but I'm really, really happy with the Harley. It's up there with the Monster 750 (my first new bike); they're next and neck for most fun at this point. That's saying a lot. When the time comes to replace my Thunderbird Sport I would seriously consider a Sportster for my 'around town' bike. The Glide is a little unwieldy for errands, and too valuable to get knocked over in Chicago city parking. That being said, I do my grocery shopping on both bikes.
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Old 01-31-2009, 05:28 PM   #8
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I think I've got the Ferodo brakes pads which are grippier over stock. Also, get a hand pump and make sure your shocks have a little pressure in them. I keep about 5 psi when riding solo unloaded and bump it up to about 10 psi when loaded and or passenger.

You don't need to worry about "feel." The floorboards will sound the warning long before the tires start to slip.
Yeah, I decked out the floorboards on day 1 of riding. Kinda funny actually. Makes you feel like a hero, hehehe.

What pump should I get? Just a generic small bicycle pump from a sporting goods store? I don't have the bike here to look at the nipple on top of the shock.
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Old 01-31-2009, 06:05 PM   #9
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Yeah, I decked out the floorboards on day 1 of riding. Kinda funny actually. Makes you feel like a hero, hehehe.

What pump should I get? Just a generic small bicycle pump from a sporting goods store? I don't have the bike here to look at the nipple on top of the shock.
A bicycle pump will do the trick. Don't use a high pressure hose. I've got the little hand pump from progressive suspension or H-D. I can't remember. It's a little hand pump that fits in the pack and has a built in gauge.

Funny how going slow is kinda fun, eh?
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Old 02-01-2009, 05:45 AM   #10
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I hear ya. I rode my Busa for 2 years of speeding around like a crazy man, I got tired of looking in the rearview seeing those flashing light behind me. After talking my way out of MANY tickets (being an ex-firefighter helps lots here) but still nearly lost my license. I wondered if I really need this shyt at 50 years old. I just got tired of it. My Bandit slowed me down, and the Harley no cop even looks at, speeding or not. Relaxing, safer, and lots more fun. Those GT bikes are evil machines that make you do evil things.
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