Motorcycle Forum

Motorcycle Forum (http://www.motorcycle.com/forum/)
-   Motorcycle General Discussion (http://www.motorcycle.com/forum/motorcycle-general-discussion/)
-   -   2009 BMW F650GS Review (http://www.motorcycle.com/forum/motorcycle-general-discussion/9968-2009-bmw-f650gs-review.html)

bgoddard 12-23-2008 12:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by theDuke (Post 197499)
Add the Kawasaki Versys to the test while you are at it.

Just what I was going to say. Some comparisons here to some of the more off-road/adventure bikes but, to me the natural rival to this bike is the Versys.

Dr_Sprocket 12-23-2008 05:38 PM

Gotta have heart
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by longride (Post 199424)
"We have sold out soul to the lowest bidder."

Man, that happened so long ago here in the US, I can't even remember when it wasn't so.

At least Harleys still have soul, perhaps 800lbs worth, but they've got soul in spades!

adoit90 02-24-2009 08:19 PM

This may be stupid but...
 
I'm looking at a first bike as a newbie, and I read on a forum that this bike is a good bike for newbies. Is this true?

If it helps any, my needs are good for long distance and short, in-town rides, comfort, and durability reliability for long distance.

BrowningBAR 02-24-2009 08:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by adoit90 (Post 205539)
I'm looking at a first bike as a newbie, and I read on a forum that this bike is a good bike for newbies. Is this true?

If it helps any, my needs are good for long distance and short, in-town rides, comfort, and durability reliability for long distance.

There are worst bikes to buy for a first bike. But a beemer is expensive to fix if you drop it, dump it, crash into a bunch of trash cans, etc.

If you are willing to buy new, than shell out a few more clams and buy a beater bike to learn on. Denting a cheap bike is less painful than denting a shiny, new bike.

jeffsback 06-29-2009 09:36 AM

Hello all, I just had to stop in and report my thoughts and feelings about my recent experience demo riding the new BMW F650GS and F800GS models.

To begin I would like to express my respect and gratitude to the awesome BMW team for a really great experience. Being that this was my first local BMW demo experience I didn’t really know what to expect. I thought they might treat us to a few laps around the block, but what we got was so much more! They took us on about a 45 minute ride each time. We rode east out of the city proper and a good ways up into the local canyons to get used to the bikes we were on. Then we turned around a little ways past Irvine Lake, waited until the road was clear ahead before lighting out really hard on the throttle and back up through the canyon. It was awesome!

The main bike I really wanted to ride was the new F800GS; and even though I showed up an hour and a half early to get in line, I was still the second man waiting to ride it; and since it was in such great demand and they only had one, I’m sure that lots of folks who wanted to ride it didn’t get a chance to.

To begin, I was a more than little disappointed that the F800GS demo model was equipped with very aggressive off road, knobby type tires. Though I’m sure that they would have allowed the bike to perform really well in the dirt; our demo ride, and my main desire for this machine was primarily street oriented. The tires were quite loud and really squirrelly anytime the front end got light under acceleration and very unsettled while carving hard into a turn. Other than these obvious tire issues that could easily be corrected with a less aggressive all terrain or street type tire, the bike was quite impressive indeed. The power delivery was much more balanced than I expected; it offers much more torque in the lower revs than many parallel twin type engines commonly offer. Not as much as much low end torque as a V-twin type engine, but very impressive indeed; and its a well balanced power that is carried very well up into the higher rev ranges, though there was some very noticeable vibration at the top end of the rev range. The suspension is equally impressive with its fantastic travel and responsiveness; though it is obvious that it was engineered for better off road performance. The front end dive under heavy breaking was more than a little bit irritating riding it hard on the street, so I found myself making good use or the rear brake to lessen the need for the front. The seat was comfortable and offers the rider many different positions to switch up riding styles. The minimal wind protection looks to be easily modifiable. All in all I think it’s a great bike if you want a highly capable dual sport machine.

My next ride was aboard the F650GS which basically has the same 798cc motor as the F800GS with a milder cam and less aggressive FI tuning which will obviously reduce wear & tear on the motor & drive train which in turn will reduce maintenance requirements and improve overall mileage expectations. My first impression: WOW! I LOVED this bike! Like the F800GS power delivery was very well balanced throughout the curve though with just a touch less punch in the lower revs as its cousin. I didn’t notice any difference in pulling power in the higher revs ; it pulled very smoothly all the way to the red; some vibration in the higher revs but much less noticeable than the F800GS. Its best features were its incredible suspension and brakes that undoubtedly work so well because this bike is light; much lighter than its F800GS cousin. Where the F850GS is engineered to cater to the more demanding off road enthusiasts the F650GS delivers much better street performance! Though the front forks are standard rather than inverted like the F800GS they preformed incredibly well compared to the Japanese standards I’m used to riding. I was highly impressed by the flawless operation of the better than adequate single front disk brake. The standard F650GS was only slightly lower than the F800GS and its seat was just as comfortable and versatile. Wind protection again looks easily modifiable.

In conclusion they’re both great bikes. My personal desire for a bike of this type would be primarily as a commuter/street traveler first, and as an occasional off road adventurer second; so the F650GS is much better suited to my needs and what a great bonus that it’s being offered at a price that is thousands of dollars less than the F800GS. If you’re looking to get better off road performance the F800GS is obviously a better choice for you, but be prepared, that extra performance is gona cost you…

kaybikefan 10-29-2011 05:31 AM

Higher RPM engine vibes
 
Does anyone know if the F650GS exhibits the same higher rpm engine vibes found on the F800G? It may not have produce engine vibes where the torque and HP are produced at lower rpm, so I'm wondering if it is fine below 7000 rpm.

Kevin_Duke 10-30-2011 11:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kaybikefan (Post 268839)
Does anyone know if the F650GS exhibits the same higher rpm engine vibes found on the F800G? It may not have produce engine vibes where the torque and HP are produced at lower rpm, so I'm wondering if it is fine below 7000 rpm.

Because the 650 has the same reciprocating parts as the 800, the vibration levels should be identical. We were hoping to get one for testing by now, but we have to wait till the 2012s come in.

kaybikefan 10-30-2011 09:25 PM

Higher RPM engine vibes
 
One reader, Jeffsback commented, "it pulled very smoothly all the way to the red; some vibration in the higher revs but much less noticeable than the F800GS". I am interested in this comment, especially the reference of the F650GS vibration being much less noticeable than the F800GS. I get the comment about the reciprocating mass, but I'm wondering if the redlines are the same for both bikes, in which case it wouldn't make any sense to go above say 7500 rpms for the F650GS, however perhaps on the F800GS it might be 8500-9000 rpms. I' curious as I'm planning on getting a F650GS or a Tiger 800, or a V-Strom 650 in the Spring.

Kevin_Duke 11-12-2011 09:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kaybikefan (Post 268893)
One reader, Jeffsback commented, "it pulled very smoothly all the way to the red; some vibration in the higher revs but much less noticeable than the F800GS". I am interested in this comment, especially the reference of the F650GS vibration being much less noticeable than the F800GS. I get the comment about the reciprocating mass, but I'm wondering if the redlines are the same for both bikes, in which case it wouldn't make any sense to go above say 7500 rpms for the F650GS, however perhaps on the F800GS it might be 8500-9000 rpms. I' curious as I'm planning on getting a F650GS or a Tiger 800, or a V-Strom 650 in the Spring.

Good questions. Having not yet ridden the F650, I can't say for certain if any difference can be felt. But it seems unlikely there is a noticeable difference in vibration. The three bikes you mention are all worthy of your attention. We've been trying to get an F650 for a comparo, so wish us luck!


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:41 AM.