Go Back   Motorcycle Forum > Motorcycle.Com General Discussion > Motorcycle General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-17-2008, 03:58 PM   #1
Administrator
Administrator

 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: On My Bike
Posts: 1
Default American Supercamp Riding School Review


Original Article:
American Supercamp Riding School Review

Please discuss the Motorcycle.com article American Supercamp Riding School Review in our Motorcycle Forums below. Use the reply button to let others know your comments or feedback on the article. Constructive criticism is always appreciated, along with your thoughts and personal opinions on the bikes and products we have tested.
Administrator is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links Remove Advertisements
Motorcycle Forum
Advertisement
Old 09-18-2008, 12:53 PM   #2
MOKE1K
Registered Member
 
MOKE1K's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kalapana, Big Island
Posts: 3,993
Cool

Quote:
Originally Posted by administrator View Post
Original Article:
American Supercamp Riding School Review

Please discuss the Motorcycle.com article American Supercamp Riding School Review in our Motorcycle Forums below. Use the reply button to let others know your comments or feedback on the article. Constructive criticism is always appreciated, along with your thoughts and personal opinions on the bikes and products we have tested.
This is by far the best way to learn how to back a sportbike into corner. Didnt read the Article wonder if D.Walker is still teaching?
__________________
"YOU CAN'T BOLT ON SKILL"
MOKE1K is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2008, 01:33 PM   #3
Cheesebeast
Registered Member
 
Cheesebeast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: At the end of a quiet country lane
Posts: 274
Default

Yes, Danny still teaches/runs the show. The only change of significance to American Supercamp is they have very recently gone from Honda to Yamaha bikes.

I bought a supermoto bike mostly because of the fun I had at American Supercamp. The second I kick my supermoto to life my IQ drops in half. My bike is plated for the street (the state I live in cares about some things, like dog licenses and stumpage fees- but not about registering dirt bikes for street abuse).

I have had to look local law enforcement in the eye and inform them that no, I didn't know how fast I was going. My bike doesn't have a speedometer!
Cheesebeast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-19-2008, 01:43 PM   #4
DonS
Registered Member
 
DonS's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: not warm enuf long enuf!
Posts: 1
Default

I think I already know the answer but...

Is this beneficial to street/supersport riders?
DonS is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2008, 07:21 AM   #5
Cheesebeast
Registered Member
 
Cheesebeast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: At the end of a quiet country lane
Posts: 274
Default

You betcha it is beneficial. Sometimes on the street you need to change direction, not in a graceful "C" arc but more of a "<" sharp angle. Supercamp teaches a physical style of riding that will tell you a lot about your limits.

It is difficult to find those limits on a street bike. At least, I am not going to loan you mine while you try to discover just how tight of a corner you can make...

Additionally, the track applications of the style of riding (backing it into a corner) are discussed in the course. Videos of races show the techniques being used, performed by people with names you would recognize.

Lastly, if you are a supersport rider and you discover yourself having to take a gravel road you might find the course pays for itself in rapid fashion. Where I live we have a lot of dirt and gravel roads. I am a lot more comfortable with a street tire shod bike squirming around underneath me now. Also, the rear end breaking loose on a sand sprinkled curve is something that happens to us all eventually. I exercise more throttle control now. Sure, I am still ham-fisted, but less so and that is PROGRESS.

The single most disturbing thing I discovered in the class is that there are people out there who are having more fun than I am. Get dirty!

Last edited by Cheesebeast : 09-20-2008 at 07:48 AM.
Cheesebeast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-20-2008, 10:54 AM   #6
sfcdjevans
Registered Member
 
sfcdjevans's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: 43.47N-76.48W
Posts: 956
Default

So how hard is this on the riders right leg? I have reasons for asking.
__________________
3425 miles from Reading, UK
Why their heads on a pike of course. If I thought it would do any good.
sfcdjevans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2008, 07:22 AM   #7
Cheesebeast
Registered Member
 
Cheesebeast's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: At the end of a quiet country lane
Posts: 274
Default

I would guess the workload to be about 75% on your left leg and 25% on your right. The right leg tends to stay closer to the bike as you are operating the rear brake with that leg. Getting the technique down will help to minimize injury- you should be steering the bike with your inner thighs.

I have a bad right ankle so I wore my Oxtar TCS boots. They are not motocross boots, which would be overkill in this case. The benefit to a "street" or "track" boot is they would have smooth soles. This will help to skim across the surface without digging in.

If you have a trick knee then I would advise wearing a brace. In the beginning your technique will be lousy and you could dig a boot in, which could lead to you getting tangled up in the bike as you fall. Once the technique starts to stick if the bike washes out underneath you you will discover yourself essentially sitting on top of the fallen bike- not tangled up.

If you cannot bear any weight on your right leg then I would probably pass on this style of riding. There will be times when you are supporting the weight of the bike on that leg. Fortunately, the bikes in the class are very lightweight- I would guesstimate about 175 pounds or so.
Cheesebeast is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2008, 03:44 PM   #8
sfcdjevans
Registered Member
 
sfcdjevans's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: 43.47N-76.48W
Posts: 956
Default

This getting old crap is starting to wear on me. Hmm I'm looking at the third and maybe final knee surgery. Guess maybe I'll just go hang out with the local folks so I can say I'm cool, if they'll let me.

Thanks for the info.
__________________
3425 miles from Reading, UK
Why their heads on a pike of course. If I thought it would do any good.
sfcdjevans is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off