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Old 02-14-2008, 06:17 PM   #31
chuckster243
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This prize winning gizmo reminds me of an ardvark after it suffered a stroke. Or an armadillo suffering an identity crisis.
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Old 02-15-2008, 07:03 PM   #32
jr4488
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Originally Posted by chuckster243 View Post
This prize winning gizmo reminds me of an ardvark after it suffered a stroke. Or an armadillo suffering an identity crisis.

Wow, you guys are a rough crowd. I've been reading all of the postings so far and it doesn't look anyone appreciates the bike in the slightest.

I originally saw the Tim Cameron illustration of the V-REX a few years ago on the Internet. I was completely blown away by it. I had no idea that anyone was actually going to build one until I saw it at the Love Ride in Los Angeles a few months ago.

Being in the high-end motorcycle rental business gives me the opportunity to ride many fine motorcycles. I also ride with colleagues who have as many or more bikes than I do and we switch-off.

I enjoy riding the V-REX immensely. I am aware of the low ground clearance and I plan ahead for it when I am riding. I can do a U turn in the street easily and have done it dozens of times for photo-shoots. I like the airdam in the front because it keeps the wind off my chest when I am cruising on the freeways. The bike feels great at about 80 mph which is where I like to ride anyway.

Although I agree with some of you that some of the design elements are similar to things that have gone before, overall the V-REX ranks as one of the most original motorcycles to ever go into production. Look at the front swingarm carefully. It not a center-hub design and is completely unique. The whole bike is manufactured using aluminum castings and the frame (if you call it a frame) is unlike anything in motorcycling.

Frankly, I was staring to get board with street motorcycles. They are all either cruisers, sportbikes, touring bikes or some combination. The V-REX is a breath of fresh originality. It is completely different from anything anyone has ever seen. That's why it draws crowds where ever it goes. People just haven't seen anything like it before.

After seeing and riding the V-REX, I have the highest respect for both Tim Cameron and Christian Travert. They have created an amazing motorcycle.

Flame on...

jack
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Old 02-15-2008, 08:49 PM   #33
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OK, finally got to actually read through the article - lemme say the thing looks cool as hell. I wouldn't drop 40+ G's on it, but I have to admit I wouldn't drop that kind of coin on ANY bike. (hell, that's more than I owe on my HOUSE)

You mention that the fuel tank is the frame (like the XB Buells), and it's core is a Harley engine & controls, with other Buell parts.

Are the castings made by the same firm as make the XB's?

Also, how much (if any) Harley/Buell "input" went into the design?
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Old 02-16-2008, 12:00 AM   #34
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Are the castings made by the same firm as make the XB's?

Also, how much (if any) Harley/Buell "input" went into the design?
Christian Travert told me that Harley and Buell had no input in the design of the V-REX. He decided to use a Harley engine because Harley has a program whereby OEMs can acquire Harley engines. He also wanted to build a bike that could be serviced at a Harley-Davidson dealer.

Travert has not shared with me where the castings come from. I do know that it took several months to find a vendor that could produce the big aluminum casting in the middle of the bike that includes the gas tank.

The wiring harness, foot controls, hand controls and engine are V-ROD components. The front brakes are Buell. I don't know what the back brakes are off of.

The front and rear shocks were done by a guy from France who consults for Ohlins.

The bike has a chain drive jackshaft, a belt final drive (to keep the engine in the middle of the bike) and the same final drive gear ratio as a standard V-ROD. I have had the bike to 130 mph and there was more left. I couldn't go faster because the wind blows your feet off the pegs because your legs are out in front of you.

Travertson is currently working on a new motorcycle that should be out in a year or so. They won't tell me what it is. They do say that it is a Tim Cameron design that no one has seen and that it is very fast. Based on Christian Travert's reputation and my own experiences with the V-REX, I have already placed an order for the new bike and have been promised the first production machine. I'm sure Kevin Duke and I will enjoy the new bike when it comes out...

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Old 02-16-2008, 05:52 AM   #35
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It looks very much like the classic answer to a question that nobody asked. For the money I'll go Boss Hoss. Way cooler.
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Old 02-17-2008, 08:58 AM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jr4488 View Post
Wow, you guys are a rough crowd...

It is completely different from anything anyone has ever seen. That's why it draws crowds where ever it goes. People just haven't seen anything like it before.

Flame on...

jack
Allrighty then. If you shoved a couple of glow sticks up your nose, stuck a feather duster up your butt, painted yourself purple and walked around naked, you'd look different and draw crowds. Since I don't live in L.A., I can't conclusively say people haven't seen anything like it before, but the point remains: just because something is different does not create value in and of itself.

The benefit to going outside the norm should be to create new paradigms within a given field of endeavor. If this bike has some breakthrough technology and/or design that really does something better than what's been done before, then it's worth putting up with its faults; you get a payback. If it's just weird for the sake of being "different," it's a waste of time. Take a look at "choppers." The original choppers of the 50's and 60's had a reason to be different. The extended forks lifted the front ends for better clearance when cornering. Higher handlebars were more comfortable on the highway (for some). Modified exhausts provided better performance on bikes of that era. But, when the point of doing those things to a bike became just making them have a certain look and sound, instead of adding value, the features became deficits that the rider had to live with. Thus, the extreme chopper craze is a flash in the pan that's dying fast.

As for this particular bike, there are parts of it that I like. However, the entire front end looks completely out of whack to me. If that front end performs a LOT better than forks, the telelever, or some new center hub designs that are coming out, then I'd probably get over its weirdness pretty quickly. If it's primary contribution to the bike is making it look different, then to hell with it.
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Old 02-17-2008, 09:03 AM   #37
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Default Unique? Nah.

Before using the word "unique" in the article, the author would be wise to search the annals of motorcycle history for the Bimota Tesi 1D (1991), Yamaha GTS1000 (1993) and Vyrus 985 C3 4V (2006, I think).

There are still a pretty good number of the Yammies on the road, too.

Last edited by Blrfl : 02-17-2008 at 09:05 AM.
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Old 02-17-2008, 09:57 PM   #38
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Default Think I'll rent the Desmo instead Kevin

Very nice article, photos, and video. Bike is interesting but I would never own one unless I was Jay Leno and I needed it for my collection. Think the Confederate Bikes are cooler.
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Old 02-19-2008, 01:58 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blrfl View Post
Before using the word "unique" in the article, the author would be wise to search the annals of motorcycle history for the Bimota Tesi 1D (1991), Yamaha GTS1000 (1993) and Vyrus 985 C3 4V (2006, I think).

There are still a pretty good number of the Yammies on the road, too.
Before blindly criticizing others, an objective writer would do well to research the subject and note that the front ends of the Bimota and GTS1000 are totally different than that of the V-REX. And they should also know that the Vyrus is simply a rebadged Bimota 2D.

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Old 02-19-2008, 02:22 PM   #40
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You used the word 'paradigm'. Middle-Management soon in your future.

No matter how I planned a ride in Utah there's no way that thing would survive it's lack of ground clearance. There simply aren't any roads that wouldn't play hell with it's undercarriage. Who wants to ride a bike you had to 'plan' that much for where you are going anyhow?

Now if I had 40K to spend on bikes I'd end up with 8-10.But if people like these things and want to belly up and pay for them who am I to rain on their parade? Go for it. I'm sure I'll see them the next time I'm at Spider's Biker Bar. Maybe next century......
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