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Old 10-05-2007, 03:16 AM   #11
Tadgh
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I imagine the S-DMS system would be useful in the rain. Since people use these as daily drivers in Europe and the UK it makes sense I guess. a 16k rpm Sportbike on wet cobble stones would probably be something of a handful if you weren't careful
as a daily driver on the 750 i dont think you'd need to kill the power, the 750 makes relatively good smooth power until it kicks at about 10k rpm.it doesnt have the low down torque of the 1000 to spin up the rear which i thought the sdms system was for. and it just seems crazy on the 600 which you need to rev the nuts off to get moving at all. if you are going to redline it across cobblestones i think you may encounter traction issues.
of all the bikes i have ridden or owned i still put the 750 up there as one of the best mixture of power and handling, a really great bike to ride despite whether you like the look of it or not (i dont like the new exhaust) which really should be the point ?
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Old 10-05-2007, 08:14 AM   #12
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Are the bikes going to get better fuel mileage at the lower settings? Use the low setting for commuting, the go to full power for track days or canyon carving.
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Old 10-05-2007, 08:30 AM   #13
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Hmm. You would think fuel mileage would increase. I wonder if any reviews will touch on this. But I am mechanically stupid, so I could be really wrong.
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Old 10-05-2007, 08:44 AM   #14
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Originally Posted by Tadgh View Post
as a daily driver on the 750 i dont think you'd need to kill the power, the 750 makes relatively good smooth power until it kicks at about 10k rpm.it doesnt have the low down torque of the 1000 to spin up the rear which i thought the sdms system was for. and it just seems crazy on the 600 which you need to rev the nuts off to get moving at all. if you are going to redline it across cobblestones i think you may encounter traction issues.
of all the bikes i have ridden or owned i still put the 750 up there as one of the best mixture of power and handling, a really great bike to ride despite whether you like the look of it or not (i dont like the new exhaust) which really should be the point ?


I've never owned or ridden one so I don't know, It was just a thought......
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Old 10-05-2007, 09:55 AM   #15
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Speaking of Italian, isn't it time for Aprilia to redesign their bike?
Rumor has it that Piaggio is in the process of reworking both the bikes and the production facilities. If I remember correctly the Shiver is the first production bike on the new platform.
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Old 10-05-2007, 10:17 AM   #16
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Hmm. You would think fuel mileage would increase. I wonder if any reviews will touch on this. But I am mechanically stupid, so I could be really wrong.
.... for mechanical knowledge on a bike as maintenance free as a BossHoss.
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Old 10-05-2007, 10:37 AM   #17
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Are the bikes going to get better fuel mileage at the lower settings? Use the low setting for commuting, the go to full power for track days or canyon carving.
It would depend on how the bike is ridden. If you're like us, you'd be spending more time at big throttle openings with the DMS in mode C, so you'd probably not see an improvement in fuel mileage. Also, it would be like water torture for most motojournos to ride around in mode C for a few tank-fulls...

Regarding Aprilia, they have the new 750 Shiver and the 850 Mana. Also, they will show off their new V-4 superbike at this November's bike show in Milan, but it probably won't make production for another year.
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Old 10-05-2007, 11:05 AM   #18
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Regarding Aprilia, they have the new 750 Shiver and the 850 Mana. Also, they will show off their new V-4 superbike at this November's bike show in Milan, but it probably won't make production for another year.
I've never ridden a V4... any dramatic difference in ride characteristics over a twin? I'd think counter-balancing (and therefor vibration) would be less of an issue.
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Old 10-05-2007, 11:36 AM   #19
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I've never ridden a V4... any dramatic difference in ride characteristics over a twin? I'd think counter-balancing (and therefor vibration) would be less of an issue.
...slimmer like V-twins. So you get a more slippery aerodynamic. However the improved aerodynamics are offset by the increased cost of producing the engine and increased weight. As the market has shown I-4s are still dominant because most buyers decided that the advantages of the V-4 didn't matter for street use and weren't willing to pay the higher cost. Witness the demise of the Honda V-4s of the 80s.
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Old 10-05-2007, 11:56 AM   #20
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Honda still actually makes two V-4s: the VFR800 Interceptor and the ST1300. When the cylinders are set at a 90-degree angle, vibration isn't an issue. A counterbalancer is likely to be used with the cylinders set at a narrower angle, like the new Aprilia.

V-4s are costlier to produce than an inline-Four (two sets of cylinder heads, cams, etc), but they are very enjoyable to ride. They tend to produce a slightly richer midrange and usually sound wonderful. The Yamaha V-Max is another V-4.
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