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Old 07-20-2012, 12:40 PM   #11
Kevin_Duke
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glb51 View Post
The article states in part:
Nearly as important as avoiding mixing tire construction types is installing one new tire instead of two – specifically replacing a new front tire while still using a worn rear. This cheapskate mixing of new versus worn could potentially cause instability in the bike’s handling.

--

Well, I do tend towards being a cheapskate but I also don't like to litter the environment with needless waste. I have a V-Strom that uses 2 rear tires per 1 front and an FJR that does the exact opposite. Assuming that (yeah, I know), does the recommendation stand or should the recommendation be more closely related to wear?

For example, replace both tires when both are at the same stage of wear requiring replacement?


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Cheap but not stupid cheap (if that's possible)...
Every tire company will say to change them both. But if one of the tires is well and truly worn while the other (usually the front) has only moderate wear, it's very possible you won't have a problem. But perhaps you will, so we can't really officially endorse that cost-saving move.
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Old 07-20-2012, 12:44 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by The Spaceman View Post
That's a good point, Trent. The Ducati 1199 Finagle also comes with a specifically designed Pirelli, but my DL1000 comes with Bridgestone DeathWings, which apparently are specifically designed to lose traction on wet surfaces. Changing over to Contis was a huge improvement to handling, braking, etc. in all conditions.

Having said that, maybe what the article meant by "identical tires" was the size and type., and not necessarily the brand and model.
Exactly, most important is the size and type, not necessarily the brand.

And, as Buz notes (and I fully agree), going to a different size tire can also be beneficial. Going to a 180 from a 190 rear gives a noticeable improvement in steering quickness, and it often also supplies a more linear steering response than the fatter tire.
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Old 07-20-2012, 01:51 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by trenttheuncatchable View Post
Nice article, but I mostly disagree with "best practice is to select replacement tires identical to those currently on the motorcycle."

For example, if you ride a Diavel, which comes with custom Pirelli Diablo Rosso II tires, then the statement makes sense. But if you ride a pre-gen Ninja 250 or 500, then most aftermarket tires are better than the oem tires that came on the bike from the showroom floor.

Manufacturers usually don't put the better quality tires on bikes, because that would increase the cost of the bike.
True enough, and especially true on bikes built to a low price point.
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Old 07-20-2012, 02:05 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by The Spaceman View Post
Funny you should say that.
...

The offshore tire reefs didn't do much better, IIRC they had to go out and haul them away; the coral wouldn't grow on them and they started washing up on the beach.
The Osborne Reef was what I was referring to. As the article says, they had Navy and Army Divers doing the recovery. IIRC, they fashioned a vertical conveyor belt to take the tires to the surface.
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Old 07-20-2012, 07:30 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by glb51 View Post
The article states in part:
Nearly as important as avoiding mixing tire construction types is installing one new tire instead of two – specifically replacing a new front tire while still using a worn rear. This cheapskate mixing of new versus worn could potentially cause instability in the bike’s handling.

--

Well, I do tend towards being a cheapskate but I also don't like to litter the environment with needless waste. I have a V-Strom that uses 2 rear tires per 1 front and an FJR that does the exact opposite. Assuming that (yeah, I know), does the recommendation stand or should the recommendation be more closely related to wear?

For example, replace both tires when both are at the same stage of wear requiring replacement?


Thanks!
-------
Cheap but not stupid cheap (if that's possible)...
And the paragraphing following the above selected generally supports your practice:

"Since a motorcycle’s rear wheel is the driven wheel, it’s not uncommon that the rear tire wears sooner than the front, leaving the front tire with many more good miles. Replacing a rear tire without replacing a front tire that’s still serviceable may be moderately less risky than doing the opposite. But again, employing best practices says replace tires in pairs if you can."
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Old 07-21-2012, 10:54 AM   #16
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Concur wholeheartedly with the soap and water cleaning method. Please send your team of thong clad godesses to my place. My tires are dirty
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Old 08-05-2012, 11:00 AM   #17
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Originally Posted by Duken4evr View Post
Concur wholeheartedly with the soap and water cleaning method. Please send your team of thong clad godesses to my place. My tires are dirty
Not just your tires...
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Old 08-05-2012, 11:17 AM   #18
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I usually replace both in pairs, by the time the backs toast the front is usually cupped from front braking. Even if it has plenty of tread left it's still not smooth.

I'm in a different boat really because owing to cool and wet temperatures, road surface construction and my anal attention to tire pressure and smooth riding style, I easily get 15k out of a rear. The most I got was over 18k on a Pilot Road or was it an Avon....whatever, the point being by the time the rear needs replacment the front is close to toast too.

I'm flabberghasted when I read of you guys changing tires every 3~5k on a street bike, what do you ride on, hot lava rocks? That would be a set of tires every oil change! I'd be looking for a little harder compound myself....
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