Go Back   Motorcycle Forum > Motorcycle.Com General Discussion > Motorcycle General Discussion

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 08-13-2010, 08:17 AM   #1
Administrator
Administrator

 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: On My Bike
Posts: 3
Default 2010 Oddball Sport-Touring Shootout: Ducati Multistrada vs Honda VFR1200F vs Kawasaki Z1000


Original Article:
2010 Oddball Sport-Touring Shootout: Ducati Multistrada vs Honda VFR1200F vs Kawasaki Z1000

Please discuss the Motorcycle.com article 2010 Oddball Sport-Touring Shootout: Ducati Multistrada vs Honda VFR1200F vs Kawasaki Z1000 in our Motorcycle Forums below. Use the reply button to let others know your comments or feedback on the article. Constructive criticism is always appreciated, along with your thoughts and personal opinions on the bikes and products we have tested.
Administrator is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links Remove Advertisements
Motorcycle Forum
Advertisement
Old 08-13-2010, 09:00 AM   #2
jmdonald
Founding Member
 
jmdonald's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Mission Viejo
Posts: 1,291
Default Nice Touch

Great idea adding the Z into the mix. I must respect a bike that has the Z's abililty at half the cost of the others.The video commentary is a great addition to these reviews. They add a descriptive dimension and quality you would not have otherwise. You lucky bastards. Keep up the good work.
__________________
Secede.
jmdonald is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 09:08 AM   #3
sarnali2
Aging Cafe` Racer

 
sarnali2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Sittin' down by my window, lookin' at the rain.
Posts: 8,719
Default

Of the three the Kawasaki seems like the best deal. I have to agree with Jeff, the nearly $10k price difference will buy a nice set of GIVI cases top box and different windshield if needed. $20k for the VFR would be a tough pill to swallow specially with all the goodies optional instead of standard, I'd choose a number of different bikes based on price alone. While the Honda appears to be a stellar performer I personally would go with a known quantity like an R1200RT or Triumph Sprint GT or Tiger, both brands that I've had excellent luck with before I'd drop $20k on a brand and model I've had bad luck with.

That leaves the Ducati, at one time I had a serious Jones for a 900SS and ST2, I'm afraid my Italian lust these days is more focused on Moto Guzzi, still the Multi appears to be an excellent bike and the standard 33 in seat height would be nice.
__________________
"Carpe` Throttelum -Loud Suits Save Lives"

"He said he's farting because of his medication"...
sarnali2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 09:26 AM   #4
seruzawa
The Toad

 
seruzawa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: 8501 ft.
Posts: 17,461
Default

Certainly they are all nice bikes. Not many bad bikes out there any more. We are living in the Golden Age of bikes.

"Incidentally, on its consumer website, Honda categorizes the VFR under Sport and not Sport-Touring."

Er, yes, I would categorize a 600lb bike as a "sport" bike too. (eyes rolling)

Sport touring is simply the act of using a sport style bike as a tourer, right? For that matter an SV650 could be a sport tourer by adding a shield and some luggage. The people who think they need a bike that the manufacturer calls a "sport-tourer" to actually be on a sport-tourer have missed the boat. It can get weird to the point where the brobdingnagian Honda ST1300 is called a sport-tourer.

I guess it boils down to just how much sport you want with your tourer and the term "sport tourer" becomes essentially meaningless. Personally I gravitate to lighter bikes like the Duc or SprintST. I used my 2000 ZRX1100 as an ST for a couple years. Never felt deprived. YMMV.

The only thing that really causes concern is that I see the heavy electronics/sensor packages to be probable huge maintenance costs down the road. Time will tell, but I'd let someone else beta test these things.
__________________
"Make no mistake, Communism lost a big argument - one we know today as the 20th century."
seruzawa is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 09:34 AM   #5
mscuddy
MODERATOR X

 
mscuddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Next to my still checkin the temp.
Posts: 5,449
Default

A Jawa 350 Californian with a Velorex sidehack & panniers. You can get whole family to foodmat over a plain of golden grain, where a young boys head is plainly seen.

Ah hoo ya hoo ya hoo yaya...swiftly flowing river...
__________________
A gun is a tool, Marian; no better or no worse than any other tool: an axe, a shovel or anything. A gun is as good or as bad as the man using it. Remember that.
mscuddy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 09:40 AM   #6
sarnali2
Aging Cafe` Racer

 
sarnali2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Sittin' down by my window, lookin' at the rain.
Posts: 8,719
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by mscuddy View Post
A Jawa 350 Californian with a Velorex sidehack & panniers. You can get whole family to foodmat over a plain of golden grain, where a young boys head is plainly seen.

Ah hoo ya hoo ya hoo yaya...swiftly flowing river...

a samovar full of tea and a flask of vodka to ward off the chill, cabbage soup and a little bit of lamb and some borscht for the ride home.......
__________________
"Carpe` Throttelum -Loud Suits Save Lives"

"He said he's farting because of his medication"...
sarnali2 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 09:50 AM   #7
Jeff Cobb
Motorcycle.com Staff
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 146
Default What's it take to sport tour?

The Z could just as well fit the Every Bike category, or the what-ever-else category. As pointed out, by Seruzawa, many good choices abound. Many bikes will go the distance. If a rider has experience and knows what to do, any number of bikes could be converted to be a terrific sport tourer. I do not need someone to do my thinking for me. When they do, they add complexity, weight and cost, and soon the "sport" side of things is being compromised in the equation. The aftermarket has high-rise adjustable clip-ons, hard/soft waterproof luggage, windscreen options, on and on ... The Z1000 is merely a blank slate with a well-priced literbike at its heart. We could have done the same thing with a CBR1000RR with C-ABS. You could kit that bike up with hi/lo adjustable clip-on bars, hard bags, high screen, etc., and conservatively come in 100 lbs or so under the big Viffer with the best ABS on the market. Or, if that doesn't sound appealing, pick your bike of choice and make your own ultimate ...

Last edited by Jeff Cobb : 08-14-2010 at 10:28 AM.
Jeff Cobb is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 11:32 AM   #8
MOwings
Founding Member
 
MOwings's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 47
Default

Add a Ventura Rack to the Z and you wold be good to go. It might look a little funny though.
MOwings is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 12:26 PM   #9
SpeedwayRN
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 97
Default

Hate to sound like an ol fart but I think simpler is easier. I know one day all motorcycles will have a fancy suspension similar to the multistrada's. However I think I will wait on the sidelines and let all the bugs get worked out before I jump in. These days the all the electronic black boxes seem to cost more than the mechanical hard parts. So what we could have is a motorcycle that is "totaled" because the magical black box parts cost more than the value of the bike.
SpeedwayRN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-13-2010, 04:18 PM   #10
suiryu
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 1
Default Multistrada Errata

This article contains some major misinformation with regard to the capabilities of Ducati's electronic suspension system:

Quote:
Taking the Duc’s electronic load setting to its firmest load setting (two riders w/luggage) seemed like too much preload, as over rough pavement the front wasn’t as forgiving. And as Kevin remarked during our ride, the increased front preload actually slowed turn-in response somewhat since the fork wasn’t allowed to compress as much – reducing rake – when transitioning between turns.
DES does not affect preload on the front, it only adjusts the rear. Front preload can still be adjusted on the Multistrada, but you have to break out the wrenches and do it manually. Perhaps you did so and neglected to mention it? If not, the slower turn-in response was either imagined or the result of something other than the front preload setting. I would guess that it was a result of the rear of the bike being slightly lower since the spring was more compressed.

Quote:
Despite the convenience of electronically adjusted suspenders, whether it’s BMW’s or Ducati’s system (and who knows what else is around the corner), suspension tuning by the average rider/owner of these motorcycles is limited to the preprogrammed settings. The ability to fine-tune settings specific to a particular rider is still the realm of standard adjustable suspension.
This is true of BMW's ESA system, but for Ducati's DES it is completely false. DES allows you customize every individual parameter of each of the four main modes for each load condition. You can set compression and rebound to values from 1 to 32, and rear preload from 1-16. Apart from the suspension settings you can also change the engine map (150hp low, 150hp high, 100hp), and traction control (8 settings). ABS can also be disabled, but this must be done every time you start the bike. All other parameters are remembered across starts.

This long after the bike's launch, and with all the articles that have been written about it, I was really surprised to see an article come out that completely missed this feature. I hope you see fit to issue a correction so that your readers are not misinformed.

Last edited by suiryu : 08-13-2010 at 04:36 PM.
suiryu is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off