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Old 05-26-2010, 09:04 AM   #11
The_AirHawk
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Originally Posted by A Star Ride View Post
yeah, pushn 40 now even too old for cowboy campn'
Sleeping with rattlesnakes and scorpions in your bag is over-rated anyhow.
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Old 05-26-2010, 10:03 AM   #12
jeff10236
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If I use a windshield bag, it will only be for the smallest and lightest of items (not that they are very big anyway). They seem to be sized about right for sunglasses (or a place to put your glasses when wearing sunglasses). When wearing my motorcycle glasses I'll keep my regular glasses in a pocket on my jacket (my mesh jacket has a pocket specifically for glasses), and since they are transition lens glasses I won't need quick access between sunglasses and regular glasses. If I use a windshield bag it would be for money for tolls and maybe a pocket knife and pen.

As for the tank bag, on another forum someone mentioned that they may not work very well for a cruiser. He said they may get in the way of the handlebars at lock. Does anyone here use one on a cruiser, and are some models and styles better suited to one than others? I assume the lower profile the better.

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Although you're not carrying the load on your back, weight is still a consideration on a bike. Not just how much, but where you put it.
True, it will be a lot more limited than a car or truck, but a lot easier than on your back. I was figuring that if the amount of gear was kept reasonable (not much choice with the amount of storage space) it would be fine, but I guess I should probably check my bike's GVWR. I already knew that I would have to keep the weight balanced, probably something easier in theory than in practice.


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I find that there are numerous motels near our natural wonders.

Or you can find a motorcycle tent trailer which will carry whatever you need.
I am a big fan of the outdoors, and camping is cheaper. I may eventually get a trailer, but my bike's owners manual specifically says not to use one so it will have to wait until I get a bigger bike.

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Try to keep all your stuff in the saddlebags, except the tent, bag and groundpad. Those will strap to the pillion seat or sissy bar.
Interesting idea, I hadn't thought about strapping anything down without a motorcycle specific storage bag, but a tent in its bag and a ground cloth and sleeping bag in stuff sacks (preferably compression sacks) are already bagged and may work fine with bungies.

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go to aerostich and order the moto fizz camping seat bag.
Those look terrific, great idea! I'd probably get the medium. How easy are they to remove and carry with you (for security) when you make stops?

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Gettin' old, eh?
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yeah, pushn 40 now even too old for cowboy campn'
Hey now, 40 isn't anywhere near old! (Says the guy who turns 40 this summer ).
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Old 05-26-2010, 10:08 AM   #13
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So, anyone who has done it, do you bring a backpack stove and food, or do you use restaurants when you camp on your bike? It seems restaurants would save a lot of space (especially not needing to bring bulky items like cookware, plates ,food, etc.- a little backpacking stove isn't too bad on its own), but cooking on a camp stove and campfire is half the fun (OK, maybe not half, but a lot of the charm). Then there is the question of what to do when at a campground in the middle of nowhere. So, motorcycle campers, how do you handle the food/cooking issue?
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Old 05-26-2010, 10:18 AM   #14
The_AirHawk
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I found that "cleanup" is the hardest part of the full camping-experience. 'Specially if you're either at someplace that a) has no sanitary water to cook/clean with. Or b) is so pristine, that you're loathe to foul that places water with your own soap-waste, and there is little to no place to dispose of it otherwise.

Yeah, I know they've got biodegradable soaps nowadays.

I usually find it simpler to let a local Mom-&-Pop do my cooking for me, about 90% of the time. Use non/minimal-cook, easy-to-prepare food for smaller meals. But I HAVE been wanting to try some "exhaust pipe chicken".......

(cooked using the bike's exhaust pipe whilst traveling - the FZ-6 even is built as if they wanted me to try it!)
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Old 05-26-2010, 04:33 PM   #15
A Star Ride
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When I camp on the bike I usually camp with others who bring larger gear or my local club sends a gear wagon with everyones bulky crap. I have several times just brought a can of chunky soup, crackers and plastic silverware. Start fire first, crack the seal on the soup, put it near the fire, then build tent etc turning th can 1/4 turn whenever you think about it, it'll be warm by time your all set up. Or hit Subway, get a footlong, tell them no mayo (makes it soggy) eat 1/2 for dinner & 1/2 before crashing so you dont wake up starving. I also bring my coffee press on the bike the perculator is too big to take along. You can use a backpackers stove but they are a P.I.T.A. and then you need fuel and something to cook. I also have a telescoping fork cooker thingy that folds to 6 inches, grab some brats, buns & mustard are overrated anyway. Just be creative & have fun.
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