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Old 05-21-2010, 05:52 PM   #41
SethJS
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Default too hard to start

i think it's too hard to get into motorcycling. there's just a lot of friction. unless you have a friend who already rides, how do you get your license? who's going to teach you to ride? will you really like it?

yes, there are msf courses everywhere, but they're hard to find. something about motorcycling is just intimidating to break into, and without a friend to help, i think a lot of people just dont do it

i'm not aware of any for profit "learn to ride" programs - only advanced programs for people who already know how to ride. you dont ever see "learn to ride" ads at motorcycle.com or in the magazines.

net: there are high barriers to getting started, and no one makes it easy to learn how to start riding

perhaps motorcycle.com could put up an area of the site dedicated to newbie riders?
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Old 05-21-2010, 06:08 PM   #42
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If it were a true statement, I would be riding a GP800 here in the US and have total support both in parts and service. ...not having to wait for parts or service like I owned a Chinese scooter.
That could be a good point about the parts, which is why we asked about it. The Aprilia/Guzzi rep claims a 98% fill rate within 2 weeks. Curious to know your recent experience?
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Old 05-21-2010, 06:17 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SethJS View Post
i think it's too hard to get into motorcycling. there's just a lot of friction. unless you have a friend who already rides, how do you get your license? who's going to teach you to ride? will you really like it?

yes, there are msf courses everywhere, but they're hard to find. something about motorcycling is just intimidating to break into, and without a friend to help, i think a lot of people just dont do it

i'm not aware of any for profit "learn to ride" programs - only advanced programs for people who already know how to ride. you dont ever see "learn to ride" ads at motorcycle.com or in the magazines.

net: there are high barriers to getting started, and no one makes it easy to learn how to start riding

perhaps motorcycle.com could put up an area of the site dedicated to newbie riders?
Three points:
1. Both the introductory and advanced MSF courses mostly address your concern. It's ideal because you don't need a bike to take the course, so you can find out if you like it or can even do it. This would be a good starting point for the MIC and AMA to publicize these courses in conjunction with the MSF. "You don't need a motorcycle to learn how to ride one!"

2. The vast majority of males aren't interested in taking an MSF course. It's as if men think they are genetically auto-programmed to be able to ride.

3. Newbie rider section? We've knocked that idea around. But we're so busy with our regular work that it would have to suffer if we were to create a whole new section. Would be attract enough new readers to offset the loyal ones we piss off? I'm interested ot hear other comments.
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Old 05-21-2010, 06:21 PM   #44
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Well with the internet i think learning how to ride a motorcycle is a tad less intimidating. I haven't even touched a throttle yet I have a wealth of knowledge in my head about the 2 wheeled world. The next step is just applying what I've learned when I'm on the bike. Plenty of helpful articles out there too. Coming to this site and checking the new rider forms will get you grounded some.

Searching for "how to ride a motorcycle" will bring up some useful you tube vids that can teach you the concepts of riding in under 10 minutes.

Learning how to ride won't be easy for everyone but through the challenges is where you find out if it's really right for you.

Imagine trying to learn how to ride 15-30 years ago. Now that's intimidating. No internet, crappy gear, the crap your pants sports bike just being released to the uninformed public and everything was new.

The more you think about it you wonder, how the hell did you old timers get through the "dark ages"
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Old 05-22-2010, 05:22 PM   #45
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And by old timers I meant highly experienced road warriors of course
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Old 05-22-2010, 07:38 PM   #46
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" It's as if men think they are genetically auto-programmed to be able to ride. "

Are you trying to suggest we're not? Leave your badge and gun on my desk, Mr. Duke.
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Old 05-23-2010, 12:27 AM   #47
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" It's as if men think they are genetically auto-programmed to be able to ride. "

Are you trying to suggest we're not? Leave your badge and gun on my desk, Mr. Duke.
Well, we are. It's the rest of the a-holes I worry about!
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Old 05-23-2010, 08:11 AM   #48
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Imagine trying to learn how to ride 15-30 years ago. Now that's intimidating. No internet, crappy gear, the crap your pants sports bike just being released to the uninformed public and everything was new.

The more you think about it you wonder, how the hell did you old timers get through the "dark ages"
The answer to that is quite simple. Most of us learned to ride on small, underpowered dirt bikes, and did not progress to street bikes until we had lots of time to learn the requisite skills.

In this era, dirt riding is not nearly as universal.

I do not think I ever would have ridden on the street without riding dirt bikes first.
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Old 05-23-2010, 08:46 AM   #49
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People younger than 30 have been hit particularly hard by the recession. College grads with massive student loan debt and living in their parents house are unable to find work. To reuse the phrase - "it's the economy, stupid!". That and Timoni is right - current product offerings are too expensive and too narrow focus.

There are some small entry level bikes out there though - GN250, Honda CRF230L, etc. It is not like the old days in the 70's though, when cheap small dual sports introduced many of us to riding. Such bikes were vesatile and inexpensive. A new CRF230 costs 5 grand plus tax. That is a lot of money for the stone age thing that it is. The old days are gone, unless we buy cheap bikes from China to replace the cheap bikes like the Japanese sold back in my early days. I am down on China though. It would be better not to buy anything from them...

I had the same intro as pplassm. Small under powered dual sports ridden around off road. I submit that a rider has no business riding on the street until he or she has bopped about for awhile on a small trail bike off road.

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Old 05-23-2010, 02:12 PM   #50
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Good points about learning to ride in the dirt, guys. My progression to street bikes would've be entirely different had I not first learned control (and out of control) in the dirt. It's sad that off-road riding areas have dwindled. Getting kids on dirt bikes is a sure way to create more street riders.
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