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Old 04-27-2010, 12:49 PM   #1
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Default 2010 Husqvarna TC 250 Review


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2010 Husqvarna TC 250 Review

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Old 04-27-2010, 02:39 PM   #2
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I read the article, and somewhere it said something like "revs up to the limiter like a CRF250". Does that mean it makes thirteen thousand RPMs?

If so it will last no loger than the Jap bikes, since 13,000 revs is at the limit of metalurgical technology for a single cylinder four stroke. After that, things tend to melt. And we all know the 250's blow up big time.

And big deal, I could take the plug out of my old XL350 with a pair of rounded-off pliers, how about a valve adjustment? Does that require trained winged monkeys at $70.00 an hour? And I hate that drive to Riverside...

So another big yawner huh? My old CR500 handled just fine too, and it was 20 years old.

How much? Oh fer ghods sake...
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Old 04-29-2010, 06:34 PM   #3
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Sounds like the TE version will be a killer woods machine.

I think Yamaha had it right to begin with though. 400cc is a good size for recreational riders. The 250s I have ridden off road have power, but are gutless down low, and the 450s are a handful. A developed 400 seems like the Goldilocks engine size.

Until then I will just keep ridin' my DRZ400, Heavy bike, but indestructible and perfect off road power in lightly modded form

Anecodotally, Husky seems to build a durable motor. The TE450s have proven quite bombproof, I hear.
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Old 04-29-2010, 09:37 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Duken4evr View Post
I think Yamaha had it right to begin with though. 400cc is a good size for recreational riders. The 250s I have ridden off road have power, but are gutless down low, and the 450s are a handful. A developed 400 seems like the Goldilocks engine size.
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I'm thinkin' that new 350cc KTM might be the Goldilocks size. Already won a world MX round. Keep an eye on Alessi at the USGP at Glen Helen.
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Old 04-30-2010, 07:03 AM   #5
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Sign me up for that 350.

I have a trail prepped '01 CR250 in the garage now. A bike that can approach the weightless CR's handling with punchy mid focused 4 stroke power would rule.

The thing I have noticed is it is not just the weight on the scale. Larger engines have more spinning mass. The CR engine has barely any spinning mass and it can flip flop and change direction on a moments notice faster than most politicians
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Old 04-30-2010, 09:19 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by Duken4evr View Post
Sign me up for that 350.

I have a trail prepped '01 CR250 in the garage now. A bike that can approach the weightless CR's handling with punchy mid focused 4 stroke power would rule.

The thing I have noticed is it is not just the weight on the scale. Larger engines have more spinning mass. The CR engine has barely any spinning mass and it can flip flop and change direction on a moments notice faster than most politicians
Exactly. "Weight" a rider feels isn't just mass.
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Old 04-30-2010, 06:18 PM   #7
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Best example of this was years ago I went from an '87 CR250, (which remains probably my favorite trail bike of all time) to a 500cc 2 stroke. The 500 was not that much heavier, but it did not change direction like the 250 due to it's heavy spinning crank.

I altered my riding style for the 500. In tight stuff the revs were kept low and it turned better. The thing and plenty of low down snort anyway. At higher speeds in the sand, I revved it a bit more at feathered throttle vs. a higher gear more throttle and lower revs, and found it was more stable. RPM affects handling, and the affect is more pronounced as engine size and spinning mass increase.

Then there is brake tapping and throttle blipping to correct attitude while in flight. Aren't dirt bikes cool?

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