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Administrator 05-12-2009 12:18 PM

2009 Triumph Thruxton Review
 
Original Article:
2009 Triumph Thruxton Review

Please discuss the Motorcycle.com article 2009 Triumph Thruxton Review in our Motorcycle Forums below. Use the reply button to let others know your comments or feedback on the article. Constructive criticism is always appreciated, along with your thoughts and personal opinions on the bikes and products we have tested.

sarnali2 05-12-2009 01:18 PM

Cool, looks like some needed changes with the EFI and Arrow exhaust. The higher bars kinda' lose a little on style points but makes up for it in comfort. real clip-ons are a mud check, as in how bad do you want to ride....

I enjoyed the '05 Thruxton I had just like I enjoyed my dads Bultaco cafe bike when I was 16, the single biggest thing the '05 taught me was that I am definately not 16 anymore and that large creaky bodies don't fit on tiny little bikes LOL.

I still love the look though, Cafe` Racers Rock On!

(official Cafe` Racer Song for hanging out..)

YouTube - Rock On - David Essex - 1973

Kenneth_Moore 05-12-2009 02:40 PM

I love the bike except for the performance. The '08 demo I rode was slow off the line and needed a couple of downshifts to move it along at speed. It did not have the Arrow exhaust, so maybe a Stage 1 kit makes more lively...but you'd like a little performance to go with the looks. The Duc GT1000 would eat it up.

schizuki 05-12-2009 09:15 PM

Buzglyd digs the bicycle wheels. He can put baseball cards in the spokes.

If I was buying it, I'd tell the dealer to swap 'em out for the casties on the standard Bonneville. I'd keep the stockers for my Huffy.

Ken, how would you compare the Thruxton to the GT1000 on a thrill-per-dollar basis? I think the Duc is about $12,000 compared to the Triumph's $8600. That's a pretty big difference. Is the Duc 50% better?

tripleripple 05-12-2009 09:57 PM

Just a couple thingsies. As a former Triumph owner and always-fan of their doings....

I haven't visited for awhile but their website is looking good (other than the parts/accessories being a linky no worky). I was not aware there is a Street Triple R, which looks like as much bike as anybody (I) could ever possibly need. Ever. Also, I was floored by the special edition Daytona 675. It's pearl white (I'm a sucker now for white bikes since the 848 came out) with a blue frame/swingarm. Looks really really good.

I'm really digging this new Thruxton. I gotta say I like the looks of the handlebar and think it's a good compromise between looks and function. Kinda like the Clubman bars? (intentional question mark, not to be confused with Moke question marks, which show up in all sorts of random places). Anyway, looks pretty decent with the bar end mirrors. I like the spoke wheels too. Schizuki, you'll take the cast wheels, and I think Cuddy is a cast man too, probably some others, but I think they are so damn ugly. Other than a single spoke breaking and throwing shyt off, are there other benefits to the cast? Must be since lots of bikes don't have them. Help me here.

Finally, I agree with both Ken and Schizuki. I think I want more ooomph than this bike can give and the Duc GT1000 is something that really catches my eye. Is it worth the 50% more in price?? Nope. That's why I'll get mine off Craiggers or Ebay. Been seeing the occasional used Ducati GT's and Sports with a couple thousand miles on them for a grand more than the Thruxton. That's the ticket.

longride 05-13-2009 05:10 AM

Triumph did this one right. I really dig it, but then I get visions of Sarnali on it with his pink-polka dot Roadcrafter on and I suddenly feel the need to upchuck. Still dig this Thruxton though.

SmokeU 05-13-2009 05:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tripleripple (Post 213277)

Other than a single spoke breaking and throwing shyt off, are there other benefits to the cast? Must be since lots of bikes don't have them. Help me here.


Cast wheels allow for tubeless tires, whereas spoked wheels still need tubes. Tubed tires are not as reliable as tubeless.

longride 05-13-2009 05:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SmokeU (Post 213292)
Cast wheels allow for tubeless tires, whereas spoked wheels still need tubes. Tubed tires are not as reliable as tubeless.

I'm not sure of the reliability issue, but spoked wheels need to be trued occasionally where cast do not. Also, if you get a flat with a tubed tire, you need to remove the tire to fix it, where a tubeless can be plugged. Big advantage on the road. I always carry a plug kit and a compressor for any puncture flats I may get. I never used it yet, but I figure that the day I stop carrying it, I'll get a flat.

SmokeU 05-13-2009 05:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by longride (Post 213293)
I'm not sure of the reliability issue, but spoked wheels need to be trued occasionally where cast do not. Also, if you get a flat with a tubed tire, you need to remove the tire to fix it, where a tubeless can be plugged. Big advantage on the road. I always carry a plug kit and a compressor for any puncture flats I may get. I never used it yet, but I figure that the day I stop carrying it, I'll get a flat.


Indeed. Dad got a flat on the 21" front wheel on the Deuce once. Twas quite a bytch.

sarnali2 05-13-2009 06:46 AM

Tube tires are a pain in the butt, I filled my Triumph's both the T100 and the Thrux tubes with Slime but I still never trusted them.

I can live with kickstarters and points if I have to but I hate innertubes, they'll leave you stranded everytime or you'll spend a couple of hours on the side of the road trying to patch the SOB. Usually you wind up hitchhiking home to get the truck and come back and get the bike


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