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Old 03-02-2004, 06:23 AM   #21
SRMark
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Default Re: How can I get faster?

Read Monkey Butt then watch On Any Sunday. That will put you in the right frame of mind to really want to read some "How To" off-road instructional books. White Horse Press has a few to choose from.



I can't stress the importance of becoming a better road rider by practicing in the dirt. Especially when it comes to controlling a slide. Don't be surprised if you get the urge to try a super-moto mount.
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Old 03-02-2004, 06:25 AM   #22
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Default Re: How can I get faster?

Make that "over stress"
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Old 03-02-2004, 09:48 AM   #23
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Default another dwarf heard from

Quote; "Oh Buz, you're funny afterall!!!"

No he's not funny he's just one of the 7 dwarfs - Sleepy. Dwarfs are not funny there irreverent.

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Old 03-02-2004, 12:16 PM   #24
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Default Re: How can I get faster?

Seen "On Any Sunday", will look into getting Monkey Butt.....er....the book....
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Old 03-02-2004, 01:44 PM   #25
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Default Re: another flunkie heard from

Anyone with a 3rd grade education knows the difference between "there", "their", and "they're". Too bad you flunked that with your last post. You could have been one of the dwarves too, only there wasn't one named ****head.
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Old 03-02-2004, 04:40 PM   #26
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Default Re: another flunkie heard from

Whoa! Longride, lighten-up buddy-ole-pal, I think he was making a joke. -Sean
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Old 03-02-2004, 04:44 PM   #27
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Default Re: How can I get faster?

Regular MO reader/poster "mscuddy" is a friend of ole Super Hunky. I'm sure he'll back-me-up, when I say: You could do much worse than to follow the advice of Rick Seiman. My copy of Monkey Butt has been thoroughly enjoyed. (Unlike my actual butt, which I'm proud to say has never been "enjoyed")
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Old 03-02-2004, 07:35 PM   #28
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Default Re: How can I get faster?

Ren,



If you really want to get faster I second, third and fourth all of the great advice other posters have left here for you. Track experience and dirt biking, in particular, are the sine qua non of the go fast learning curve. Technicallly it is probably easier than you currently think to be a moderate fast guy. But having said that let me answer your question with a question of my own...



Why?



Does riding your Beemer put a big old smile on your face? Do you feel comfortable with it. If it does and you do then what do you care about your pace with respect to that of anyone else? Are people who are faster than you happier than you? If you didn't ride with anyone else would you care about how fast you were going?



The reason this is an important question is that it requires commitment to be "fast" over a long term. (the annals of motorcycling are filled with temporary fast guys), and this commitment requires time, lots 'o money, and pain because once you make the decision to start up the rungs of the fast ladder you'd best start planning for the day you fall off.



I am a road racer of very moderate skill (1:40 on the big track at Willow and that usually is good for no better than top 7 in my class - Sean and Ashley can blow my doors off). My only modest claim to fame is that I can ride dirt bikes on trails at a pace that most rational humans would consider insane. What I can tell you about the go fast experience from both perspectives is that it hurts when things go wrong - a lot. Broken collarbones, separated shoulders, collapsed lungs, torn ligaments and tendons - you could teach an thorough emergency care class from my medical files. And I count myself as very lucky. Almost every weekend I go racing I see someone removed from the track with life-threatening injuries (not to mention a completely trashed motorcycle). Aside from a bunch of painful encounters with the ground I've never been hurt badly enough that my life was in danger and I've always been able to put my bikes back together without burning through too much money. I guess I lead a charmed life.



What I'm trying to tell you is that there is a serious downside to being a "fast guy" that you need to think about - especially in street riding situations where the fastest guy is often the guy with the least amount of sense. Are you prepared to take some bruising? If you think that your life will be enhanced by being able to turn the tables and torch your buddies to the degree that it's worth getting spanked (which you will) then I say welcome to the fraternity. Take a performance riding school, get yourself a dirt bike and start doing track days. But if you already love your bike, dig riding, have a big grin on your face when you are on or around your Beemer and would be perfectly content with yourself if it weren't for your buddies passing you then I'd consider saving a bunch of time, money and pain and just ditch you posse. Find some new riding buddies who are more your pace and don't worry about how fast the rest of the world is (or isn't).



It is not my place or anybody else's to question your motivation "to be or not to be" fast. But if I may share my own motives: my interest is much more academic than egotistical. To me racing (in a racing environment) is a physical chess game that happens quickly. I dig the mental toughness that is required to be successful and I like the meticulous attention to detail and the craftsman like care that is required to shave even fractions of a second off a ap time. On the street however, I could care less who is passing me and who isn't. On the street it's less like chess and more like Russian Roulette. On the street I personally ride at whatever pace I am feeling comfortable with and the only thing that could even maybe pursuade me to quicken my pace would be an atom bomb going off somewhere behind me. That''s just my way though and everyone gets to decide this for themselves.



Best of luck. Thanks for the great and very honest letter.



Martin
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