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Old 03-13-2003, 12:27 PM   #41
Mahnken
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Default Re: Fair price, for a new bike?

Goto Kelly Blue Book's web site and look up the bike. www.kbb.org
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Old 03-13-2003, 12:39 PM   #42
cornercarver
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Default Re: Fair price, for a new bike?

Develop a relationship with your local dealerships. This is difficult if you always want the latest and greatest 600, since you are going to be moving from brand to brand, but us sport touring types are more prone to keeping our bikes for a good long time and then replacing from the same brand. If your dealer understands that you intend to make lots of supplementary purchases of gear and accessories, get all of your services done there, and buy and install new tires there, you'd be amazed at what they will let a bike go for. The margins on accessories and gear is frequently MUCH higher than the margins on a bike, so they'd far rather have your business behind the parts counter than in the showroom, and you'll still get a good discount on parts and accessories, to boot.



I have two dealerships that I am a regular at, plus a race shop. My local Aprilia/Triumph/Ducati/Guzzi dealer sees a lot of me, as he is close to my job, and sold me a Mille R. I've also become friends with the owner of my local BMW dealership and much of his staff. In both cases, I have made it abundantly clear that whenever the economic disadvantage is not too great, I make my purchases and get my services done locally (one or the other shop, depending upon which bike needs the work or the part). However, I make no secret of the fact that if I find a really great deal elsewhere, or another shop has the particular expertise I am looking for, I will go there. However, I always give them a heads-up before shopping elsewhere. They will usually match the price, either by reducing their margin, or by arranging a purchase through the same place I intended to buy from, frequently at a discount that still allows them to make some money from me without increasing my cost. Even if they make no money from me on that purchase, it keeps me in their store, which makes them happy, since I always buy more than I came for, and it makes their revenue numbers bigger, even if their profit isn't.



I am now at the point where, at either store, I am guaranteed a minimum of a 10% discount on EVERYTHING I buy, and it frequently gets much better than that. I also get advance warnings about sales, incentive deals, or unique items or bikes that are passing through the store. One dealer has even let me work on my own bike in his shop, and loaned me specialty tools to do things that I couldn't do with the tools in my toolbox. OK, so they made me put shop stickers on my track bike in exchange, but I would have done that anyway, if they'd just asked. Finally, when it comes to service, the techs are especially conscientious with my bike, and I get all of those 'little' 10 minute jobs that everyone sometimes needs, for free, rather than at the minimum 15 minutes of shop time that the sign says they normally charge.



All of that adds up to a really nice experience every time I walk through the doors of either dealership, and I know that I will always get a good or great deal, even if it isn't the absolute best deal available, every time. It all adds up to real world savings over time (unless, of course, you add up all the money I spend on my bikes, in which case it is just plain depressing).



--sam
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Old 03-13-2003, 12:51 PM   #43
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Default Re: Fair price, for a new bike?

Here are two dealerships that post their discounted prices on the internet. If you're not near either one, print them up and have your dealers match them. They're good deals: Inglewood, CA and Corinth, MS. Good luck!
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Old 03-13-2003, 12:53 PM   #44
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Default Re: I test road it.

I'll have to check that out. Only problem is that the closest dealer is, I think, in Reno (actually Redding is closer, but takes longer to get there) which is 3 hours away. Still, I need to run down there to get a new battery and a few misc items for my Duc and the Harley dealer is almost next door........



Just from the pictures, the riding position reminds me of that of the Gurney Alligator. Gator has better cornering clearance though, I am sure. Maybe Jason (Dan's son, and head of the project) should build a Gator based on the V-Rod motor!



Be sure to update us when you get the upgrades installed in the geezer glide!
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Old 03-13-2003, 01:15 PM   #45
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Default Re: Fair price, for a new bike?

Only exception is if you find someone who is willing to cheat Uncle Sam (and maybe the owner) bu writing up the contract for something less that the actual price and keep the different "off the books."



I once did CPA work for a client used car dealership where that kinda thing went on. They would tell the customer that they wrote up the contracts that way to save on the sales tax, like they were doing them a favor. We dropped them as clients as soon as we discovered that practice was widespread.
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Old 03-13-2003, 01:29 PM   #46
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Default Negotiate the Gear and Accessories with the Bike

Good point about the extras having better profit margins. If you plan to add accessories, or get a new helmet, jacket etc anyway, negotiate it as a package. They have a lot more markup on the accessories and have more room to negotiate.



I usually get a new helmet when I guy a new bike -- I figure that helmets have a shelf life, and newer ones have more protection and comfort features anyway, plus I like the color to match, or at least not clash. I keep my newest old one as back up, and give the older ones to Goodwill etc.



If the manufacturer is offering special financing rates, you may be able to get those rates on the accessories and gear as well, which beats hell out of the rates on your Visa card!
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Old 03-13-2003, 01:53 PM   #47
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Default Re: Fair price, for a new bike?

Excellent points. If you are a racer or other serious performance nut, you likely will spend a great deal of money on parts, tuning etc, and establishing a good relationship with the owners and personnel of the shop will result in much greater satisfaction, and likely lower overall costs.



I figure that I have spent in excess of 2 times (probably pushing 3X) the original purchase price of my Ducati in service, replacement parts, modifications, dyno tuning etc. A lot of this was at deep discounts off of what Joe Schmuck in off the street would have had to pay, because they know I am a good customer.



I have had several items fixed under warranty even though the bike was well out of warranty and the part failed in racing (for example, I had replaced the steel swing arm on my CR with the aluminum one from a wrecked SP -- it developed a small crack and they got Ducati to replace it). They also tell me if there are items I can buy elsewhere cheaper than they can get them (which sometimes happens). I order the part over the internet and have it delivered to the dealer.
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Old 03-13-2003, 02:03 PM   #48
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Default Re: I test road it.

It is interesting in Motorcyclist they were talking about how fun the Alligator was. I could get used to the rake of the VRod. My Low Rider had a 32 degree rake. I would just have to adjust the VRod foot controls a bit closer. Oh well, I'm not getting one anyway!



The geezer is getting upgraded as we speak. SE aircleaner, pipes, 203 cam and software upgrade. It should net me about 12 hp and 18 ft/lbs.



I'll keep you posted.
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Old 03-13-2003, 02:05 PM   #49
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Default Re: Fair price, for a new bike?

When I bought my Tundra the dealer marked down the price of my trade $1000 and the price of the truck $1000 after we had struck our original deal. Here in the land of taxes that saved me a few extra bucks.
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Old 03-13-2003, 02:22 PM   #50
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Default Re: Fair price, for a new bike?

Good god, no. WHATEVER YOU DO, DON'T BUY ANYTHING FROM CHICAGO CYCLE CENTER!. I've never talked to anyone that bought anything from the unethical bastards that work there that was happy in the end. If you buy from them, you will regret it. It's not worth the $2000.
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