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Old 02-14-2003, 01:35 PM   #51
The_Aerodynamic_Head
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Default Re: Brand Loyalty

And besides...Max rode a Triumph.
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Old 02-14-2003, 01:37 PM   #52
john
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Default Re: Brand Loyalty

Definitely be a B12. Parts galore for it, dead simple to work on, huge aftermarket.



Comfy enough for ironbutts, great commuter.



and still FUN FUN FUN
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Old 02-14-2003, 01:50 PM   #53
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Default My choices

The number one choice has to be the Honda VFR (1998-2001). Everybody has already heaped enough praise on this one that I don't need to justify it.



But just beneath it I would place four bikes, the BMW 1150 GS, the Yamaha YZF600R, the Moto-Guzzi V11 California, and the Ducati ST2. Other folks have "justified" the beemer and the Goose, so I'll leave them alone.



The Yamaha is a great and overlooked bike. In this class it's light, has plenty of power, and strong build quality and reliability. The Ducati ST2 may seem odd, but the two valve Ducs last a long time, as long as you maintain them properly. I've met plenty of riders who have had their Ducatis for years. They can still get parts and they still enjoy the ride. The ST2 has handling and plenty of punch.



But the VFR remains the ride of choice. The new ones have some problems to be ironed out, but I can tell you that, as an owner, I have never owned a bike as all around satisfying as the 1998 VFR.



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Old 02-14-2003, 02:15 PM   #54
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Default Re: Yeah, but...

Actually not, but now that you mention it.......



Seriously, in 35 years of motorcycling, I have owned exactly 1 motorcycle with more than 2 cylinders -- a 1982 Yamaha Seca 650.



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Old 02-14-2003, 02:41 PM   #55
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Default Re: Brand Loyalty

My choice would be a '03 Dyna superglide T-sport FXDXT, I had planned on getting a Road Glide for my next bike, but that would have entailed keeping my 1200 bandit for a sporty ride and the Road Glide for a nice relaxing plonk around, If I can only have one bike I'd want something that could be ridden a little more briskly than a full-on bagger, I think the T-sport with it's adjustable suspension, Dyna-glide frame geometry, triple disc's and reletivley light weight would fit the niche between a sport standard and a touring bike quite well. While I love in-line fours, I think in the long run I'd stick with the HD because of dealer support, parts prices and availability and tons of aftermarket parts and independent shops to support the brand. Historicaly Japanese model's rapid change cycles preclude most dealerships from having a complete line of parts on hand, and Japanese parts prices are through the roof. That, and with the design complexity makes them more difficult to work on [for me anyway] which means you're going to the dealers if you have anymore than routine maintainance, Where-as Harley's are much more mechanicaly simple, so that a reasonable skilled owner can do a lot more of their own work if they wish. From my own experiance, I know that stock Harley's are at least as reliable as anything else and in fact I've had more mechanical breakdowns with "bulletproof" Hondas than any of the four HD's I've owned, and those were AMF shovels and sporty's, Not reknowned for reliability. While I love my Suzuki, and being air/oil cooled and not loaded down with a ton of a plastic, it's pretty easy to work on to a point, I think, that as Bob stated, I average 10-15000 miles per year, after about 10 years or so my Suzook would be getting tired, and it would be increasingly difficult to find support for it, But 15-20 year old HD's are common and easy to support, for all those reasons, plus the fact that I just like them, I'd get the Dyna T-sport.
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Old 02-14-2003, 03:03 PM   #56
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Default Re: Brand Loyalty

They don't have past or present parts availability either.
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Old 02-14-2003, 05:12 PM   #57
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Default Re: Brand Loyalty

You just explained H-D's high resale value didn't you?
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Old 02-14-2003, 05:31 PM   #58
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Default I'm with you!

Considering trading my little 750 cruiser even before I read this scenario.



EVERYTHING I've read about the V-Strom was most positive, the only exception some *****-poor excuse for a review on this besoted site.

The Motorcycle Consumer News comparo against the BMW, Caponord, and Triumph Tiger was more than comprehensive; and the V-Strom was the overall hands-down winner of the 4.



As a larger (6'2") rider, the day-to-day, all around usefulness of the tall, powerful, and flexible V-Strom appeals a lot to me. Now if our local excuse for a Suzuki dealer ever gets one or two in stock, I'll take a closer look. Poor dealer support would be my main concern for it as a long term ride!
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Old 02-14-2003, 06:05 PM   #59
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Yeah, I guess I did, I think the key is HD,Triumph, Ducati and BMW's all use the same basic architecture, and that makes a long term investment in parts and service possible for shops and owners.
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Old 02-14-2003, 06:13 PM   #60
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And if you drop in the 103" kit with a cam and heads you can have mind-boggling torque!
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