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Old 02-14-2003, 10:09 AM   #31
tumbler
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Default Re: Brand Loyalty

I'll take what ever was the cheapest Harley from what ever was the first year that AMF took them over. If owning that piece of excrement wouldn't prove brand loyalty I don't know what would!

On a more positive note I just got a 2001 yzf600r. Traded in the EX500. I can hear Gabe already "90 hp wussy bike"!
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Old 02-14-2003, 10:13 AM   #32
Buzglyd
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Default Ford F150 Harley-Davidson Lightning!

I mean this counts, right?
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Old 02-14-2003, 10:17 AM   #33
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Default Re: Brand Loyalty

Hmm...



I love thought games like this. Well for starters I would use a process of elimination. What DOESN'T work for me given the requirements?



1. No full-on supersports since I find them uncomfortable over more than an hour and I like to travel.



2. No pure dirtbikes since I spend 99% of my time on pavement.



3. No cruisers since I enjoy a good romp in the twisties and they are uncomfortable as well.



4. No full tourers since they also let you down in the twisties. At least they are comfortable.



5. Nothing carb'ed. Just a personal preference.





So what's that leave? Mostly street-biased dualsports, standards and nakeds, and sport-tourers.



Now comes the gotta have list.



1. Needs a hard luggage option. I likes my traveling remember?



2. Needs at least a partial fairing. Not fond of the cold.



3. Needs around a 1000cc of displacement. I like having a fair amount of fun.



4. Reasonably smooth engine, at least up to the ton.



5. A little different, in terms of either engineering or style or brand. I like having people ask "What's that?"





What's left now? Well the Japanese bikes were pretty much eliminated with that last requirement. What few might have been left went because I'm a snob. Harley was knocked off with the elimination of cruisers. So that leaves the Euros. And of those makes, the models that qualify include the:



1. Triumph ST

2. Triumph RS

3. Aprilia Futura

4. Aprilia Caponord

5. Aprilia Falco

6. Ducati ST4s/ST4s ABS

7. Ducati Multistrada



About the only other one I can think of is the replacement for the Cagiva Grand Canyon. But it sounds like Cagivas are no longer being imported.



How to winnow down that seven? Test 'em! Not a bad way to spend a Saturday huh?



The RS, Falco and ST4 feel a little too cramped and bent over. The Multistrada isn't available to go for a spin yet but I suspect it doesn't offer enough wind protection. The ST is nearly perfect but my knees are up against the fairing in my normal riding position. The Futura and Capo both fit but the Capo feels way down on power in comparison. Plus the seat is weird. So that leaves the Futura. In blue. Just like the one in my garage.
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Old 02-14-2003, 10:17 AM   #34
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Default Re: Brand Loyalty

For me to keep a bike for 20 years it would have to be something very special. My biggest priority would be that it would keep me emotionally interested for that long a time. I would take a 2003 999R. I know the maintenance would be hell but if I wasn't changing bikes every few years then I am sure I could afford it. I am only 32 so I figure if I keep in shape I'll be able to ride it when I'm 50 (quite an incentive to keep fit).



A 999R may not be the most practical bike to own but I can't imagine waking up to an sv650 for the next 20 years.
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Old 02-14-2003, 10:19 AM   #35
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Default Re: Ford F150 Harley-Davidson Lightning!

Hey Buz...I was wonderin' if you had washed away!



Hey, if that Sparrow is a bike, maybe the F150 could qualify! Personally, I like the lightning better, but would hold out for the new Chevy SS. Not quite the straight-line performance of the Ford, but full-time AWD is great for the kind of weather I encounter here in the mountains.
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Old 02-14-2003, 10:22 AM   #36
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Default Re: Brand Loyalty

Those were Aussies though, their tastes are always a little... off-beat.
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Old 02-14-2003, 10:24 AM   #37
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Default Re: Ford F150 Harley-Davidson Lightning!

The Chevy doesn't have motorcycle badging on it though so doesn't count for this discussion.



You think Harley will make any bikes and put Ford badges on them?
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Old 02-14-2003, 10:25 AM   #38
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Default Re: Brand Loyalty

Well...I guess I'll have to stick with my CBR954RR. I have always liked pure sport bikes, and I suspect I always will. I'm 46 years old, and between the responsibilities of work and kids (4 of 'em), the sport bike provides the sheer exhiliration that I need to offset my more serious side. Of course, other folks get the same kicks from cruisers, dual sports, etc. That is fine. I know that I just gotta have the CBR. (OK, I'll concede that I'd be just as happy with a GSX-R, 998/9, YZF-R1, or ZX, too.) Will I be able to still fold myself on it 20 years from now? I'd better...so I work out consistently to ensure that I stay as physically fit and flexible as I possibly can. The day I can't fold myself onto the CBR (or GSX-R, etc.) is the day that I call it quits.
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Old 02-14-2003, 10:26 AM   #39
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Default Re: Brand Loyalty

Good idea for a thread longride. This was the very idea behind my purchase of an '00 BMW R1150GS, in the very shiek Titan Silver Metallic.



After years of sportbikes (VFR's, CBR's, CB's etc) cruisers/tourer (HD Fat Boy, Suzuki GS850L) and dual purpose bikes (Kawa KE's as a teenager) as well as dirt bikes, I decided I wanted one street bike to do everything: haul a** on a twisty road, haul gear to the mountains to camp and ride aformentioned twisty road, haul wife in comfort, take extended touring vacations, commute and generally do whatever, whenever I wished. It had to have enough power to move well, enough suspension to haul the above, be easily maintained as I can't afford to dealer service at the milage I rack up, and be stone axe reliable as service is about as far as I go with a wrench.



Granted, this is a fairly expensive bike, but I felt the durability and ability far exceeded the savings had I bought a lesser priced bike in this class or purchased two different bikes to meet my "needs".



With the horizontaly opposed twin, even a blind, quadraplegic mouse could do the maintenance on the side of the road with only a rubber band and cheescloth.



Riding in traffic on this bike is very comforting. You are up high enough to see over all but the tallest cages, making a good perch for viewing the fairer of our species in convertibles on a warm spring day, but I digress. ABS brakes take the thinking part out of a panic stop. Just grab as much as you can and hold on. Twin power delivery doesn't get you in trouble. Forest Service roads or gravel parking lots are looked forward to, not dreaded. I've even taken it to a track day. Unfortunately there was no announcer calling the day. To hear "in a ding dong battle, the big trailie just passed the Ducati 748 on the outside in turn two" would've probably turned a few heads. The list just goes on and on.



Another benefit of the legendary GS series is the availability of aftermarket swag. I've equiped mine with extra driving lights (for conspicuity), a Corbin (nuff said), Autocom (to either talk to wife or turn music up enough to drown out screams of passengers), extra power outlets (warm passengers scream less, or so my research indicates), Ohlins Suspension (best money spent), Touratech Zega Cases (just so people ask if I'm the pizza deliveryman) and other trick tidbits.



So far I've put 30K trouble free miles on it, barely even a missed shift. While I've never been one to hold one bike very long, this is a definate keeper.
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Old 02-14-2003, 10:44 AM   #40
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Default Re: Ford F150 Harley-Davidson Lightning!

True, although I used to have a Chevy LUV pickup with a Yamaha sticker in the back window (from when I raced my SR500) -- does that count?



I figure that if Ford was really serious about making a Harley edition truck, they would leave the balance weights off the crank, and maybe forget the oil pan gasket so it would vibrate and leave oil stains on the garage floor!



Don't imagine you are getting many more miles on that new oil-spewing peice of crap? I assume you are getting the same weather pattern as the LA area.



Bob
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