Go Back   Motorcycle Forum > Motorcycle.Com General Discussion > Motorcycle News > Old News > MO vs. World

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 03-14-2002, 04:31 AM   #51
flatass
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 13
Default Re: New Riders section at MO

This was an excellent response about the way bikes are marketed and sold. Another point should be made about the way they are reviewed and generally written about. While I was deciding on a new bike I read countless articles and reviews. I liked the Bandit and had pretty much decided on the 1200 since all the articles about the 600 implied it just wasn't fast enough. Then I read the "hard numbers" on the 600 ...106mph in the quarter mile! Fast enough for what? Also I looked at the Sportster and heard countless times that this 1200 cc 500 pound bike was "a girls bike". It may be but I sure don't want to get in a bar fight with that girl. MO should explain in no uncertain terms just how fast most of the bikes out there are...not just in relationship to each other but to the real world. That even a "small" 500cc bike will run a 95mph quarter mile, more than fast enough to put you in the grave in a heartbeat. It took me a while to understand that your reviewers were writing from the bias of lots of experience and also from the past experiences of riding the very, very fast superbikes which newbies have no frame of reference for. You should make it crystal clear to any new reader that almost all bikes today are faster than any experience they have probably ever had and that once on a bike they are in a brand new reaction and consequence parameter.
flatass is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links Remove Advertisements
Motorcycle Forum
Advertisement
Old 03-14-2002, 06:15 AM   #52
das
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 237
Default Re: Big bikes okay?

I don't get your point. How is going faster around a track equivalent to being safer? I guess you're trying to say that lower-powered bikes are easier to ride faster. But isn't that what you're complaining about in the first place (that a 600 supersport makes it too easy to ride fast... i.e. over their heads)?



Please note that I'm not suggesting that all new riders should be required to start on 100hp bikes. I'm just saying that the "it's too much for you, kid" attitude is wrong. People aournd here complain all the time that the gov't shouldn't be protecting them from themselves. Time to practice what we preach.



Besides, a current 600 supersport is as safe (and probably safer) in the hands of a responsible newbie than a 10-year old standard. Take your "panic" situation, for example. Most newbies panic by grabbing the brakes, not the throttle. A current 600 supersport will be lighter, have better suspension, better brakes, and most importantly, better tires. Those attributes conspire to make them safer in a typical panic-braking situation.



For sure, an irresponsible rider who is prone to ride beyond his/her abilities is more likely to get into trouble with a 600 supersport than a GN125 (or a moped or bicycle).



But, (and here's my point) unless I actually know the person, who am I to judge whether they're responsible enough or not? I would be out of line to tell someone whom I don't know that they shouldn't get a 600 supersport (or any model) as their first bike.



Present the newbies with the facts, and let them decide, without prejudice from established riders. If they ask your advice, feel free to give it, but don't jam your opinion down their throats.
das is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2002, 06:45 AM   #53
SeanAlexander
Founding Member
 
SeanAlexander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Newport Coast, CA
Posts: 1,538
Default Re: Big bikes okay?

I'm not trying to "protect" anyone from themselves. I'm not proposing that we regulate this issue. I AM offering my advice, it is his/her right to ignore it.
__________________
I thought I'd found true happiness in my personal bath body bar.... Then I tried DOVE! with 1/4 moisturizing cream!!!
SeanAlexander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2002, 06:55 AM   #54
SeanAlexander
Founding Member
 
SeanAlexander's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Newport Coast, CA
Posts: 1,538
Default Re: Tips for New Riders

If I could only tell a new rider 5 things, this is pretty close to the list I'd give them. Well said Nick. Short, simple and easy to remember.
__________________
I thought I'd found true happiness in my personal bath body bar.... Then I tried DOVE! with 1/4 moisturizing cream!!!
SeanAlexander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2002, 01:19 PM   #55
metal
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 34
Default Re: Big bikes okay?

The better brakes argument is an interesting one. I used to ride a F3. A friend of mine who I knew used to have a bike a while back and had borrowed my first bike (Yamaha Seca II) before asked if he could take the CBR around a block. I said, "sure." No sooner as he got out on the street did some stupid skateboarder kid jump in front of him without looking as my friend paniced, grabbed a handful of front brakes and locked up the tire. Didn't save it of course. My friend was okay and the damage to the bike was minimal, but he himself admitted the responsiveness and power -- throttle as well as brakes -- took him by surprise.
metal is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-14-2002, 03:14 PM   #56
leach7
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 21
Default Re: New Riders section at MO

Training, training, training. There is no such thing as too much. This would be an excellent chance to evaluate some riding schools.



This would also be a good opportunity to stress the proper riding gear and that the cost of said gear is secondary to quality. $40 half helmet or $200 snell approved helmet? How much is your head worth to you?



A new rider section should also evaluate smaller bikes of all sizes and avoid the bigger, faster mentality that seems to be so popular.
leach7 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-15-2002, 04:51 AM   #57
das
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 237
Default Re: Big bikes okay?

Thats an apples and oranges comparison. Your friend got bit because he was expecting the brakes to be like the ones on the Seca II, not because he was a newbie. Had he been familiar with them, the increased power and responsiveness of the brakes would have been a benefit. The only thing with a chance of saving a complete newbie in that situation is ABS.



Note to newbies: Practice your emergency manouvers (hard braking, swerving, etc) at least once on every ride. It's fun to do, and some day, it'll save your bacon.
das is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2002, 06:19 PM   #58
Colorado_F4
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 29
Default Re: Why MO NEEDS a New Rider section.

The CBR 600 is a fine "new rider" bike, for certain riders. It's true, an immature or careless rider can get himself into major trouble on a 600 sportbike. But if you have the right frame of mind, it's a great bike to learn on, and it will assure that you don't have the urge to trade it in after a couple of years.



My first bike was an F4. When I first got it I rode like a grandma. I had trouble keeping up with my friend in her minivan because I was too scared to lean it over. That's the attitude a new rider should have. A little fear is a good thing at the right time.



An F4 isn't the equivalent of the Corvette Z06. Now an R1 or the likes, that would probably be too much for most new riders. The 600 is a lot tamer. On the 600 you have to have the revs pretty darn high to really get serious accelleration, and most new riders aren't going to keep the revs up there.



It's all good though. The New Rider section can explain all this and leave it up to the reader to decide.



Ride safe.
Colorado_F4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2002, 06:34 PM   #59
Colorado_F4
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 29
Default Re: New Riders section at MO

Now maybe it was just MSF propaganda or something, but I've heard it said that people who get taught how to ride by their friends have higher accident rates than those who learn in a class like MSF, and even more accidents than self-taught riders.



If I had a friend interested in getting into motorcycling I would tell them absolutely positively take the MSF course first.



The other things I would stress would be riding gear at riding attitude.



Always wear a helmet, gloves, and riding jacket. And seriously consider wearing riding pants every time you ride (I know a lot of people have a problem with this, but I wear my Joe Rocket Ballistic Pants on about 90% of my rides, even the 5-minute ride to work). They fit right over your jeans.



Riding attitude: expect that every driver is a complete idiot who doesn't see you and doesn't care if he runs over you. The fact that you have the right-of-way doesn't matter very much. If you are riding alongside a car for some reason, expect the car to suddenly veer into your lane. Then you will be ready when it happens.
Colorado_F4 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-18-2002, 09:15 PM   #60
manwhore
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2
Default Re: You WILL Drop It

I have to agree with poser about getting a used bike first. Save yourself the embarrasment of scratching up a new one and buy something that's already a little worn. That way when you drop it you can say "oh that, it was like it when I bought it"! Also the dirt is a VERY good place to learn. No cars to run you over, dirt is a lot softer than pavement, and used dirt bikes are a lot cheaper. Even street legal enduros. When on the street, my 2 cents worth would have to be, ride aware. Keep in mind what's going on around you. Pay attention.
manwhore is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off