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Old 11-24-2001, 08:52 AM   #141
Gabe
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Default Wise words from the walking dead man

I do not advocate horsepower limits, and I understand people buy what they want. Byt we have a seriously warped culture emerging where consumer choice is revered more than riding ability. I think it leads to death.



Think: Need for big bike=neglect of developing riding skill=need for bigger bike=more neglect of skill development, until finally, there is an improper reaction to a dangerous situation, but the situation is at expert level speeds. Sure, you can kill yourself on anything, but all other things being equal, it's more likely on the big bike.



I applaud your choice of bikes. I wouldn't mind having one myself. (Although I'd be scared of it on the track.) But you'd have more fun on a nicely set-up EX500, at least at a track day.
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Old 11-24-2001, 11:45 AM   #142
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Default The Buell has nothing in common with the prowler.

The prowler is a styling exercise using common tech and design. As far as being unique--the firebolt will offer a unique riding experience that nothing else will. There isn't another product with this type of power in this type of chassis. The Firebolt is not about styling. The gas is in the frame because it needs to be. They used up all the space they had left, and had to put it somewhere, so they actually went from a (superior) steel trellis type frame to an aluminum one to hold the gas. All the neat little tricks are design solutions to some problem, they didn't just throw tricks at the bike. Think about what it's done--packed something very close to a sportster motor into a 52 inch wheelbase. I've seen this bike in person, and seen it ridden, and it is a tight little bike. Is everyone missing the fact that this is a 250 GP bike with a big four stroke in it? I'll guarantee you it will be more reliable than the two stroke Aprilia RSV250, unless you're one of those people that never seem to get to 10k miles on a bike in it's "lifespan". Everyone will complain about the power numbers because here in the US they have nothing to compare it to. It should compare well to an Aprilia RSV250, though. I know right now some idiot wants to post that it must be really slow to have to compare a 1000 to a 250, so to that person: You're an idiot, shut up, and I won't be responding to anything that ignorant. It's an old air cooled 2 valve long stroke twin, so it needs some displacement to get it done. But if they pack it into a package like a 250 and it's as light (well not quite) as one, who cares what the displacement number is? Especially when it's got a little more power, better delivery, and will be WAY more reliable. The brake may seem like a gimmick, but it lightened the wheel (unsprung weight) significantly. Buell has been using one huge front disc instead of two slightly smaller ones for some time now, and it works. These are streetbikes that are not about pretending, and at the sub 130 speeds the bike will do these brakes work very well and are much lighter. I rode an M2 back to back with a ZX-6R (both 99) and the ninja's brakes were a joke to the Buell's. Better feel as well as power. The only reason dual discs are still used at all is because they're on the track, where they need the extra surface area to shed heat from scrubbing big speed over and over--so of course the repliracers have to have the dual discs too. The natural progression of Buell's braking concept is a rim mounted brake, it just makes sense. This bike will work and be fast, and even though it won't turn up the fastest lap times, I think it's possible it could be a big improvement in sporting street bikes over everything else out there. There's a real world where some of us ride every day, and want to go fast, and lap times don't mean much. For instance, a full repliracer riding position isn't versatile, you can't flat track the gravel or snow very well with it, and it's terrible for the kind of moves you do in the city. However this bike ends up doing, it's giving a riding position for serious (as opposed to play) riding, with not just a "repliracer" but a true race wheelbase. This is the stuff that would really work and blow off anything in tight traffic, and the kind of power delivery it will have won't hurt this either. I'm betting it'd do ok in the twisties too. Would I buy one? Definitely. Will I? Probably not. Well, probably not soon. But I modify anything I get--if I wouldn't buy this one it's only because there's not enough to bother modifying and that's less interesting to me. But I'd definitely buy it as a 3rd or 4th bike if I could afford that.
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Old 11-24-2001, 11:53 AM   #143
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Default 748's are cheaters in pro thunder.

They are built as track bikes, when the series was intended for bikes built to be sporting streetbikes. The 748's may as well be purpose built race bikes in that class.
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Old 11-24-2001, 11:56 AM   #144
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Default All of motorcycle design...

...is solving non-existant problems. Otherwise we would've stopped at the CB750. Sure, it handles like crap and accelerates like a stone, but we didn't know that until people started solving non-existant problems.
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Old 11-24-2001, 12:37 PM   #145
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Default Re: VFR not a sportbike?

Don't get me wrong, I was NOT capping on the VFR. I think the VFR is a great bike... as you may have gathered from my login name, I ride a CBR 1000F, which is ALSO not a sportbike, for many of the same reasons the VFR isn't - low-ish pegs and high-ish bars. Comfy saddle. High weight. Skimped on the suspension. I like my bike a lot, it does exactly what I needed a motorcycle to do... but it's not a sportbike either. I actually preferr either of them (the VFR or my big CBR) to a full-on sportbike. And yeah, you're totally right, it's the rider and not the machine... I'll never forget the look on a friends face when he had to move over to let me by... he was riding a YZF-600, hehehe...



So take a pill ok? Sheesh...
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Old 11-24-2001, 12:43 PM   #146
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Default Re: VFR not a sportbike

I WASN'T slagging off the VFR... read my above reply.



No, not much different from the current Viffer motor at all, just a little bigger and a little different tuning... Partly it's because last years VFR 800 made ONE more horsepower than the ZX-6R. One. Granted, it made 10 more lb./ft. of torque, but one more HP than a bike that has an engine 20% smaller is kind of indicative that Honda tunes that engine for tractability and longevity, not for all-out performance, the way the original VFR was. I'd like to see it retain it's friendliness - as far as comfort and riding position go, but up the ante a little in the power dept., that's all. And maybe lose 30 lbs.



Ok so it's a pipe dream. Sue me.
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Old 11-25-2001, 06:41 AM   #147
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Default Re: Why we should care...

<blockquote>You don't gotta pull cams to adjust valves (or adjust valves at all!!!!) or sync throttle bodies, or change coolant or hoses!!! I think until Japan/Europe starts making engines that owners can actually maintain by themselves without wasting a whole weekend of riding, their bikes will suck, and suck hard... </blockquote>



Apart from the sync-ing of throttle bodies (and the OHC configuration), you've just described the Nighthawk 750: change oil, oil chain, gas & go! Not very athletic, but neither am I...
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Old 11-25-2001, 06:59 AM   #148
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Default Re: Buell XB9R Firebolt reader feedback

<blockquote> The funniest thing about their attitudes is that they actually believe that the Japanese are innovative. </blockquote>



Oh, no, not innovative at all! No innovation in being the first to bring a transverse four-cylinder bike to the mass market. No innovation in being the first to bring disc brakes to the mass market. No innovation in bringing racebike handling and liquid-cooled engines to the masses. How completely conservative they are!



<blockquote> The Japanese are noted technology thieves and routinely hire Americans and Europeans to do their research, developement and aesthetics. Japanese industry is noted worldwide for its inability to create new ideas</blockquote>



They are also known for getting those "stolen" ideas to WORK and be profitable when the inventors couldn't. Both General Motors and Mercedes-Benz researched the Wankel rotary engine. Who put it on the market and found the perfect market for it? MAZDA!



The Japanese also "stole" an American idea that very few Americans were using: QUALITY ASSURANCE! Back in the 70s when America and Europe were producing CRAP, the Japanese KICKED THEIR ASSES by delivering products that would KEEP WORKING. H-D survived, adapted and prospered. Britain Inc. did not survive. Bloor resurrected it, taking KAWASAKI as his design target! So tell me why AMERICANS didn't pick up on this AMERICAN CONCEPT until the JAPANESE picked it up and KICKED THEM AROUND WITH IT??!!??



<blockquote>I seldom see many complaints about how much Ducati charges for its bikes with their poor reliability reputation. </blockquote>



May I suggest that you open your eyes? Reliability and parts availability have been a tale of woe for Italian bikes for decades! I believe that situation has improved recently, just as H-Ds are no longer the pieces of crap they were in the '70s. I will make no comments about Aprilia, as they do not seem to be a traditional Italian bike maker...



Damn, I hate xenophobes...
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Old 11-25-2001, 07:09 AM   #149
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Default Re: Buell XB9R Firebolt reader feedback

There is one recent Japanese bike that journalists say has character and feel: Suzuki SV650. The Firebolt is more powerful but more expensive.



Being a boring guy, I'd rather have a Nighthawk 750 or a XL883R...
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Old 11-25-2001, 07:38 AM   #150
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Default Re: Be American - buy the best!

So America is a country where you should buy only American products, whether the product is what you want or not? Sounds more like a Communist philosophy to me. Isn't trashing people because of what they choose to buy an Un-American Activity?
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