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Old 10-10-2001, 12:01 AM   #81
CarsSuck
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Default Or maybe...

he meant the fact that working on it isn't as ridiculously overcomplicated for what it is like the Intruder didn't make sense to him
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Old 10-10-2001, 04:10 AM   #82
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Default More heritage than you'd think - and not a Triumph copy

Sure, it somewhat resembled a Triumph, but it was significantly more advanced.

The engine was based on a design Yamaha did for a Toyota sports car, and it was the bike that put the final nail in the coffin for the Brit-bike makers.

So I'd argue it wasn't so much a copy of a Triumph as it was Yamaha saying to Triumph "THIS is how it's done."
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Old 10-10-2001, 06:27 AM   #83
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Default Re: Bonneville America reader Feedback

I've got a CB900C, too, and many times have found myself standing in a showroom actually considering a Harley/Triumph/BMW/ETC/ETC. When I look at what the CB has and can do, I pass up the new iron every time! This "new" Bonnie won't do it either. Why pay more to get less? Only the Valkyrie has the right stuff to tempt me....just waiting for used prices to hit my threshold.



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Old 10-10-2001, 02:18 PM   #84
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Default Re: Bonneville America reader Feedback

You know, just because Aprilia makes a scooter it doesn't downgrade your Mille, or because Honda makes a lawnmower, your RC51 isn't less of a bike. Why would Triumph's Bonne America hurt the image of the other bikes?



I think variety is good. I also think Triumph made a very fine looking bike this time. For the buyer of this bike, the other offerings from Triumph just won't do. Hell, just consider the number of people with inseams less than 32 inches for starters.



For those of you who can argue the absolute beauty of one sport bike's fairing over the other's for hours at a time, or must have the latest carbon fiber bolt on - Get a life. And don't think your obsessions are any more significant than the chrome billet shifter pegs on my Harley.
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Old 10-10-2001, 03:40 PM   #85
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Default Re: Heritage Special - 2000GT connection?

The XS650 engine was based on the engine in the Toyota 2000GT? Wow!



Someone I know had a XS650 that was a total nightmare. He hates it immensely; according to him that bike copied mid-70s Triumph reliability...
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Old 10-10-2001, 09:27 PM   #86
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Default The 883 Harley

Don't believe the hype BigGit. I see Sportsters constantly here in the Chicago area, and I remember hearing Harley sells as many Sportsters as they do all other models combined. You have a large base of options for it, and the design is tried and true. The 883 may be 'underpowered' to those who are used to 600cc racereps on the road (say that 5 times fast), but I've been on the expressway and been passed by one, and I was going 85mph.



And blah blah Harleys are evil etc. etc. It breaks down all the time blah blah. If it was as bad as they say it is, would the same engine design stay since what? 1950's? That's longevity for you, and you can still get parts for the 1950's models from Harley too. Does Honda still make exhausts for the Dream? =)



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Old 10-11-2001, 02:08 AM   #87
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Default Re: Inseam-challenged Riders

I have to agree that the low seats of cruisers are appealing for those of us of below-average height. However, I also find that the forward foot controls on many of these cruisers very uncomfortable, so I would say it's a trade off.



That feet-forward, low-butt, high-hands riding position looks cool around town, but I give it 20 minutes at speed before I need to get off the bike or find a windshield. Short riders can't move their weight around much because they have to stretch to reach the controls at all.



I think Triumph will have trouble with the America for other reasons, as well. It's fairly expensive for what amounts to another mid-weight cruiser. There are many less expensive alternatives in this crowded market, including some very well made bikes from Honda and Yamaha. Combine this with Triumph's tiny dealer network and lack of brand image for cruisers and I predict many Americas sitting in showrooms.



The standard Bonneville, on the other hand, has little direct competition (ok, the W650 which is short for this world and the Sporster, perhaps) and really builds on the image people have for the brand. I think Triumph should try a cafe-racer knock-off based on this bike instead of trying to compete directly with Honda.
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Old 10-11-2001, 03:08 AM   #88
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Default Re: 270° crank in a parallel twin...

Hmm... if that is the case, then why didn't they put the 270° crankshaft in the TDM850, which would be rather more likely than the TRX to go in the dirt?



Actually, that power delivery line is given as one of the advantages of a 90° V-twin in racing. I figured that Yamaha was trying to get the same advantage using their existing inline twin (since you object to the term "parallel twin" when used with a 270° crankshaft).



Inline twins may not be as narrow as V-twins, but if both are DOHC, then the inline twin has two camshafts while the V-twin has four...
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Old 10-11-2001, 03:35 AM   #89
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Default Re: The 883 Harley

Apart from the fact that I can't afford a new Nighthawk 250, the major concerns I have heard expressed about the Sportster (883 or 1200) regard vibration and ergonomics, not power. In fact, Sportsters are generally the fastest stock H-Ds and the usual starting point for folks trying to build a fast Harley.



I am absolutely certain that an 883 Harley will be MUCH more powerful than my CM200T, which cannot attain 60 mph (at least not with me on it...).



Funnily enough, I thought there was rather little interchangeability between the '57 - '83 ironhead Sportster engine and the '84 - present Evo Sportster. As for unreliability, AMF Harleys did have spotty reliability, but so did the products of just about every other major Western manufacturer in the '70s. The survivors have seen the error of their ways and have MUCH better QC than they did then. The current Triumph is not one of the survivors; it is an entirely different concern from the ones that ran the whole show into the ground, and it makes entirely different bikes.



I think parts for the Super Cub are still available, mainly because derivatives of the Super Cub are still being made... OTOH I cannot find a new gearshift lever for my TwinStar; I bent mine in a pothole fall last Saturday and the Nighthawk 250 gearshift will not fit (Twinstar alternator sticks out more than Nighthawk's).
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Old 10-11-2001, 03:37 AM   #90
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Default Re: W650 short for this world?

Is the W650 really down for the count? I wonder why? Is there really that little of a market for a real motorcycle?
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