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Old 10-22-2001, 05:55 PM   #171
itchface
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Default Re: Suggestion to biggit

There really wasn't any need to use the 3 periods at the end of your comments, signifying that there's more to the statement than was written. That statement seems very much complete to me. I normally wouldn't worry about it, but I understand that MO has a serious shortage of server space and, frankly, I was a bit peeved that I was forced to shift my focus by a billionth of a degree to take in all of those superfluous periods. In the future, please try to conserve!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 10-23-2001, 09:24 AM   #172
fuzzyjim
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Default Re: Year 2002 Honda reader feedback

Amen Charles - I ride a Bandit 1200 but would jump at the chance at an updated Magna with big cubes. I used to have a Saber V65, and I loved that ridiculously smooth mega power.

Hail to the V4!

Jim
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Old 10-30-2001, 08:05 AM   #173
REDSHIRTCASUALTY
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Default Re: Year 2002 Honda reader feedback

Really like your attitude about the XX. Where is that kind of thinking from Honda??

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Old 10-31-2001, 10:20 AM   #174
superscoot
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Default Re: Year 2002 Honda reader feedback

Why no mention of the new Silver Wing in the "Year 2002 Honda" article? This is big news to me as I've been waiting years for a Super Scooter to trump the Helix. Thank you, Honda! I've already put down my deposit.
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Old 11-08-2001, 09:25 PM   #175
Dual__Exhaust
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Default Re: Year 2002 Honda reader feedback

Performance First is more like second or third. Or, maybe trying to control every market segment stretches the top Big Red engineering teams too thin.
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Old 11-09-2001, 07:28 PM   #176
PatBateman
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Default '02 Ace

Help a poor squid. I'm in the planning stage of selling my 97 Trans Am and getting, possibly, an 02 Ace 750. I've read everything at msgroup.org (great tips there) and planning to take the MSF course next week. Then I begin selling my car, so I have a while to pick a bike.



While I'm a speed freak in the car, I recognize the danger of bikes and am vacuuming safety information, with my #1 goal of being safe on the bike. While I might drive 130mph with my V8, the point of the bike is simply to save money and ditch this expensive car.



My goal is to stay under $6k and get a nice looking cruiser.



I rode dirt bikes about 10 years ago, too long ago to remember anything.



The Ace 750 (VT750CD) is attractive due to being one of the cheapest bikes and great looking, having ~750cc. At 500lbs I'm afraid this bike might be a bit much for a first-timer. Chain maintenance is not an attractive idea, yet, I hear shaft performance is not as good. If this bike is too much, the VLX line is really my only choice, around 500cc.



The Suzuki Volusia, and 805cc bike with shaft drive, looks great, and I found one under $6k brand new locally. A bit bigger than the Honda in CC, but the shaft I suspect would balance that out anyway resulting in a similar bike.



If my concerns about starting out are valid, and I should have something less powerful, the VStar with 605cc shaft drive looks like a good option. It's an excellent looking bike and quite cheap, with a shaft drive.



On the other hand, if I'm overworrying about CC, I'd like the 805cc Suzuki so that I could grow into it.



My only other worry is rear drum brakes all around. I hear they suck, but, overbraking is bad, so maybe this is a good thing.



Another question: How long do bikes last, assuming regularly scheduled maintenance is honored and the bike is not abused? I've heard it all - that 15k on a bike is 100k on a car (meaning one year) versus stories of Honda bikes going 200k miles.



HELP A SQUID! A URL that would answer all this would be welcome too.



- Patrick Bateman
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Old 11-09-2001, 11:52 PM   #177
BigGit
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Default Re: Apology to itchface

I just re-read your second post and realized I missed something:



<blockquote>Clearly I'm very insightful, knowledgeable, and an extremely good spellur. </blockquote>



Had I caught the "spellur" earlier, I would have realized that the massive egotism in the post was all a joke, like the Mac Davis song "Oh Lord, It's Hard To Be Humble". Unfortunately, I did miss that and the "ego trip" just had me seeing red, which caused me to bring down the hammer.



What can I say? I blew up, and I'm sorry.
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Old 11-10-2001, 01:18 AM   #178
BigGit
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Default Re: I do not know how helpful my advice will be...

... since all my motorcycling experience is on small standards and commuters, but I'll try anyway. Most of this stuff is second-hand info; more experienced riders will post soon (if they haven't already...)



First of all, I would like to commend you for planning to take the MSF course before buying a bike. I would suggest that you not call yourself a "squid", as the term generally refers to clueless sportbike riders with little regard for safety or riding skill, and who always want the fastest, most powerful bikes available despite the fact that they have no idea how to use them effectively. Your interest in starting out in a safety course (and your interest in cruisers) keeps you well out of the "squid" category.



Now, I assume that part of your definition of a "nice-looking cruser" includes a V-twin engine, as all the bikes you mentioned have one. If so, then the Suzuki LS650 Savage and the Kawasaki Vulcan 500 fall out of consideration (the Triumph Bonneville America would be well over your $6K limit anyway) These are lighter and somewhat more manoueverable than the midsize (!) cruisers you mention.



The concerns about weight are twofold: being able to control the inertia while riding and picking the d*mn thing up after you drop it (and you WILL drop it, trust me!). You can ask your MSF instructor about those scenarios.



The best thing you can do toward deciding which bike is right for you is to try them out with test rides, especially if you go with a friend who is an experienced rider. However, I hear that most dealerships do not allow test rides, so that avenue may be closed.



Drum brakes are old technology, and it is true that disc brakes give better braking performance at the limit. But drums work; the bikes aren't unsafe for not having rear disc brakes.



As for final drives:



CHAIN:



Pro:

- Easy gear-ratio swapping,

- No appreciable torque reaction,

- Efficient power transfer when properly set up.



Con:

- Requires frequent lubrication, especially with an exposed chain,

- Chain enclosures don't look cool so most cruisers don't have 'em.

- Wear and "stretch" of the chain causes the need for periodic realignment, which if neglected or done incorrectly will greatly shorten the life and reliability of the chain



SHAFT:



Pro:

-Relatively little maintenance,

-Greater reliability (less to get wrong and less frequent opportunity to get it wrong).



Con:

- The most inefficient of the three main methods of power transfer.

- The shaft generates a torque reaction that affects the bike's stability, especially in corners.

- Changing gear ratios is NOT simple or quick (not really a problem except in competition)



BELT:



Pro:

- Cleaner than chain

- Lighter than chain

- Possibly more wear resistant than chains (depending on application)

- No appreciable torque reaction



Con:

- Some bike designs make changing the drive belt a real pain (unlike chains, belts can't be opened)

- Changing gear ratios is NOT simple or quick (not really a problem except in competition)

- Periodic adjustment needed (not applicable for some Buell models)



With regular maintenance, modern bikes should last a very long time. Even modern Italian bikes, although they might require a bit more maintenance...



One last note: I'm sorry to hear that your entry into motorcycling is coming at the expense of your Trans-Am. I'm even more sorry to state that I'm not in a position to buy it.
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Old 11-10-2001, 09:51 PM   #179
PatBateman
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Default Re: I do not know how helpful my advice will be...

Thanks, everything is helpful.



I can't believe that anyone would enter motorcycling without taking the MSF course. It just seems moronic.



I read an article on how to pick up bikes at msgroup.org that I'm pretty confident about. I didn't know how I'd manage that, but now it seems simple.



I think I'll stick with chain, the idea of having a torque effect while cornering is a bit scary. How hard is it to lube anyway? Since I always keep things maintained regularly anyway, the chain adjustment shouldn't be an issue. And since I'm probably going to get the Honda, it should last long enough.



Thanks again,



Pat
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Old 11-14-2001, 08:35 AM   #180
PatBateman
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Default 2002 Magna vs ACE750

Can I have some opinions?



Here's the URL to the specs to help:



http://www.hondamotorcycle.com/model...number=VT750CD



http://www.hondamotorcycle.com/model..._number=VF750C



I know little about engines. I guess what I'd like to know is whether the bigger bore/stroke, compression, DOHC (vs SOHC), and suspension differences are worth the $1500.



Pat
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