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Old 05-04-2001, 12:17 PM   #1
DialedIN
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Default Re: Triumph Tiger Reader Feedback

Ok you talked about the new motor but you said nothing about horse power or torque differences from the old mill. How did it handle?

Oh well enough nit- picking the artical!
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Old 05-04-2001, 12:36 PM   #2
floundericiousFL
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Default Re: Triumph Tiger Reader Feedback

weeelllllll....they DO have the HP and Tq. numbers posted at the end of the article...



and you COULD go get the last Triumph Tiger Review they did and compare the two, right? )



'scuse me, just nitpicking the nitpick
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Old 05-04-2001, 02:14 PM   #3
bimota
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Default Yuck

Where's the Mantra? Just kidding. Why do they have to make bike like the Mantra, Tiger, etc so very ugly?
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Old 05-04-2001, 02:15 PM   #4
sqidbait
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Default Re: Triumph Tiger Reader Feedback

That's a pretty lightweight bike review.



Obligatory nitpick: As for the Brit's liking their bikes

to look like dirtbikes... isn't the UK far more

sportbike mad than the US?



-- Michael



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Old 05-04-2001, 03:38 PM   #5
starvingstudent
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Default Re: Triumph Tiger Reader Feedback

Yeah, but the spread of bikes is much different as I understand it. The US is about 50% sportbikes, 50% cruisers (from my un-scientific observations). Cruisers never really caught on in Britain, so street-oriented dual-sports occupy the place of sit-up, relaxed, torquey bikes. So even though, say, 67% of Britain is sportbikes (once again, highly unscientific findings based on a two-week visit), there's still 33% dual-sports. As opposed to the 1% dual-sports in the US
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Old 05-04-2001, 05:41 PM   #6
Smoker
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Default Re: Triumph Tiger Reader Feedback

Triumph is really in close competition with BMW. With money as no option I would have a very difficult time choosing between the two. Triumph is lighter and certainly has the performance motor of choice. But the Beemer is more sophisticated, is better for touring, and that new brake system could someday really save your keester! It's a tough call, what do you guys think?!
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Old 05-04-2001, 07:22 PM   #7
starvingstudent
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Default Re: Triumph Tiger Reader Feedback

They're both excellent bikes technically, so I don't think you can base a decision solely on the bike's statistics (sure, each is slightly better in certain ways, but they're both excellent overall). The real factor, I'd say, is the aura/soul of the bike. Do you like the industrial, Indiana Jones-ish, "I'm off to fight Nazis in North Africa" attitude of the BMW? Or the lighter, "cruising the backroads of Scotland on this jolly good afternoon" feel of the Triumph? Does the sound of a triple or an opposed-twin tug at your soul more? Look at both of them, sit on both of them, test-ride both of them, and go with your gut instinct. I doubt either would disappoint.



And if money is no object...could you wire a few thousand my way??!! College tuition is killing me, but I want to add a SV650 as a stablemate to my Shadow 600...



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Old 05-04-2001, 09:42 PM   #8
BammBamm
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Default Re: Triumph Tiger Reader Feedback

According to the mags I read, it's the Europeans that really go nuts for the dirtbike on the road look. Honda Africa twin, Triumph Tiger, Cagiva Canyon, Aprillia Pegasso, Honda Dominator, and the KTM Paris Dakar looking thing etc. Triumph sells a lot of Tigers in Europe. Great bikes on bumpy roads. Will stuff a stiff sportbike in bumps and potholes.
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Old 05-04-2001, 11:42 PM   #9
MattTinSF
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Default Re: Triumph Tiger Reader Feedback

No there's a multi-bike shootout I'd like to see!



You just named most of my favorite bikes, along with the KTM Duke, the MuZ Scorpion, the big Husqvarna thumpers, and other super motard bikes. I want one of each!



So many bikes, so little money...

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Old 05-05-2001, 05:42 AM   #10
jared
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Default Re: Triumph Tiger Reader Feedback

It is a difficult choice indeed, and much has to do with (as mentioned previously) the soul of the bike and the compatibility of the rider. I made this choice about 3 weeks ago, choosing the Tiger. I have long since been a beemer rider, and now very much regret the decision. One thing I really appreciate on the beemer is the attention to detail and engineering of the bike, whereas I attribute these features as the encompassing essence of the bike's soul.


I have found the Tiger to possess nothing special over Japanese models in quality and attention to detail, and in fact have found it quite poor in many areas, making it worse then Japanese bikes, and far inferior to the beemer. The wind screen / fairing combination make for the worse turbulance I have ever experienced on a bike (been riding for 10 years solid). I actually have to bring Asprin with me to work every morning because of the buffeting. The vibration of the bike overall is quite unpleasent (have had to remove and reinstall my mirrors twice since they loosen after high speed highway rides). I have seen / talked to my dealer 3 times about this, and they finally reside to "It's a characteristic of the bike." My hands still buzz 1/2 hour after parking the Tiger.


The seat has about 3/4 inch of play both, vertically and horizontally while in the highest position (in fact it popped out of the front guide while riding last week). This improves only when lowered to mid or lowest position; this I attribute to a rather cheap deisgn of placing the adjustment brackets on the seat rather than mounted on the bike as on BMWs. Even without the uneasy feeling of a seat squimring beneath you while going down the road, the seat proves far too narrow for any long-term comfort.



In all, I find the Triumph Tiger not the bike for me, since power is not my main objective (I'm a touring fanatic). As for the price, consider my recent Tiger add-ons, and determine if you may have to make the same: 1. two different windscreens for the buffeting issue ($130 /piece), 2. center stand ($220.00), 3. Heated grips ($175.00), have seat redesigned for comfort ($550.00), the two Triumph pannier bags ($1000, as opposed to $635 for the BMW equivalent). So, now I tack on about $2200 to the Tiger price over purchase, and still am not pleased, and the BMW was only 3K more. This is not including all the mods I will have to make to the Tiger in the future (i.e. to fix the vibration in the handlebars myself, since apparently Triumph designed the bike to vibrate, according to my dealer).


One last thing I implore you to do: Try to search for an aftermarket part that is specific to make and model for the Tiger. What you will find is a very small amount out there, and the ones out there are over seas. So, this means one of two things, if you can't find an aftermarket: you have to buy it from Triumph (high price, and long wait: been 3 weeks on the panniers, and expect 2 more), or wait for them to make it, which they probably won't... they've received thousands of complaints about the buffeting issue alone, with little to no windscreen mods.


I realize this response is very negative towards the Triumph, however, you can read MO's review to get to know the good things about it (except you will get the buffeting around 45-50 MPH and above rather than the 80 they listed, and the higher windscreen merely re-routes the turbulance, and shoots it around the fairing; go for the sport screen and take the wind head on). Definately ride both bikes, and get on the freeway if possible. Think about what you're really going to do on the bike, and take the Tiger for what it is: a lower-powered sportbike, that has the look and feel of an off-road. The beamer lends itself to touring moreso than the sportbike arena (80 HP vs the new Tiger's 104HP). Good luck!
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