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Old 02-14-2006, 06:11 PM   #11
LiionsRest
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Default Re: Round Three:Best First Bike: We Need Your Help!

I'd normally say keep it under 500cc, but I know of two exeptions...

Moto Guzzi Breva 750

Suzuki Marauder (if they still make the 800).

They're both very smoothly controllable, and not given to scaring the crap out of a novice with sudden eye flattening acceleration.



My first was a Suzuki 350 two-stroke streetbike, and right at 6000 RPM it would positively lunge.
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Old 02-14-2006, 06:18 PM   #12
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Default Re: Round Three:Best First Bike: We Need Your Help!

The best bikes for learning are the little dual-sports like the Suzuki DR200, the Yamaha XT225, or the Kawasaki KLR250. They're great on either the street or the cow-trail. Then they are worth keeping when you are ready to upgrade to a bigger bike, because the small dual-sports are superior to bigger bikes in many ways. They're dirt-cheap to insure, so you might as well hang on to them anyway. Sometimes I think I get more smiles to the gallon on the little enduro than any other bike. Tuck the little bike in the back of the garage as well as the newer, bigger, bike and you'll be happy!



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Old 02-14-2006, 07:17 PM   #13
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Default Re: Round Three:Best First Bike: We Need Your Help!

At risk of incurring the wrath of many "dualies & dirties, I respectfully submit that machines designed to perform in two disparate environments are not necessarilly the way to go. Among other undesireable features are seat height, compromise on/off road tires, and engines that simply aren't designed to operate efficiently on urban thruways. Since accessing off road venues is as difficult for 85% of Americas metropolitan-based riders as finding a local track available with instruction, what would be the point of opting for a machine that will likely never see mud and whatever training value that may have offered? I believe the more rational road is with a small displacement machine designed specifically for the street and a rider who is MSF trained.
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Old 02-14-2006, 07:39 PM   #14
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Default You Nut!

We need bikes we can buy here in the USof A! We don't even know how far a kilometer is. Is that like a furlong?



I don't know what a Spada is, and they call the ER6 a Ninja 650 here. Good reccomendation for a taller, more mature, better trained (and wealthier) rider.



I wish we could get the CBR250R here; I'd race one! The best 250 sportbike sold is the tired old 250 Ninja, which has a 20 year-old designe. Fun but it's more like vintage racing than a modern sportbike experience.



Once plugged into the metric converter, you suggestions are very good. Thanks, Stefan!
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Old 02-14-2006, 08:19 PM   #15
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Default Re: Round Three:Best First Bike: We Need Your Help!



I believe that the best type of bike for the new motorcyclist is a 250cc to 400cc trail bike. Kawasaki KLR250, Honda XR250L, Yamaha XT250, etc. are the sort of thing I mean.</p>


These bikes are cheap to buy and fun to ride. The ergonomics make them easy to control.</p>


If new riders have an opportunity to ride "off then he/she has a really good opportunity to learn quickly how to hanle a motorcycle in adverse conditions; skills that will stay with him/her for the rest of their riding days.</p>


I started with an XL125 Honda (with the exhaust pipe that went down under the motor and up into an ugly chrome plated thing! The exhaust was replaced with some raucus thing and all the steel mud guards were replaced with "MX plastic" ones - really cool! I then moved on to a Yamaha DT250 (the blue, first monoshock model; now there was a really good bike. A flirtation with a Kawasaki Z500 was followed by a Yamaha XT600 (good bike for the road and fire trails but not as good a trail bike as the 'DT'. Now in retirement I ride a Vespa ET-150 and wish I had purchased a Kawasaki KLR650 or KLE500 for similar money.</p>


Regards,

Peter</p>
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Old 02-14-2006, 09:15 PM   #16
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Default Re: Round Three:Best First Bike: We Need Your Help!

Hey if I started on 600 Superspot you can too. Seriously save the cash get a 650 SV and spend the money on good gear and track time..Twins are newbie friendly

"Welcome kpaul/sportbike pilot , your account expires in 15 days"
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Old 02-14-2006, 09:18 PM   #17
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Default Re: Round Three:Best First Bike: We Need Your Help!

sportbike pilot ooops sorry SBP. should of said sportbikebandit. I miss the Professor (SBP)...is he OK?
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Old 02-14-2006, 09:37 PM   #18
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Default Oh Lord!

It's hard enough to get a story out of Sean as it is!
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Old 02-14-2006, 09:48 PM   #19
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Default Re: Round Three:Best First Bike: We Need Your Help!

After taking the MSF class, I had absolutely no problems starting on an older 600cc supersport. Once I got used to the subtleties of the riding position, I found it just as agile and easy to handle as the dirtbikes in the MSF class. I also appreciated the dual front disk brakes and narrow clip-ons for city riding, and when I move to a newer model it can easily become a track bike.



And, for the proponents of getting a "naked" bike so you don't have to worry about scratching plastics if you dropped it -- mine plastics came pre-scratched, so that wasn't an issue!
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Old 02-14-2006, 10:42 PM   #20
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Default Re: Round Three:Best First Bike: We Need Your Help!

It doesn't matter if you never take them off road; The little dual sports are the best for beginning riders. They're just so much fun and are so friendly and versatile that you'll be trying all sorts of stuff much sooner than with any pure street bike...with much less possibility of negative consequences. It's just a hoot to ride a little bike at the limit. You'll like it so much you'll never want to get rid of the little bike no matter what more "serious" bike you end up with.



You'll learn what a bike does at the limit much, much, faster



If you start out with a bigger bike like a 600, your creative process will be stifled to some extent no matter what your learning curve is.



If you've never owned a little dual sport, get one right now...it's not just a matter of needing something to learn on, it's just something every rider is going to have an absolute blast with, especially a beginner. I can hardly describe how much innocent fun hooligan stuff I've done with that little bike and how happy I've been with it. I would be crushed if I didn't have that little dual-sport in my line-up of bikes. (I have multi-bike syndrome real bad) I ride the wheels off of of it and you can't imagine the fun I get out of it.

Almost all of it is street riding, but the little bike is a temptress...I end up where I shouldn't be down alleys and sidewalks and trails.



Just get one, especially you people wondering what to learn to ride on. You won't regret it.



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