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Old 11-21-2005, 08:40 AM   #61
Tigercub
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Default Re: Motorcycle specific oil?

No difference!! Car versus bike oil testing was done by Motorcycle Consumer News. It was an excellent, well controlled test followed up by oil analysis afterward. There was no difference.



Triumph specifies Mobile 1 15w-50 oil for their bikes, not the car 15w-50 Mobile 1 and they charge about 2 to 3 times for it. I've been running the car oil in my Triumph for 14,000 miles in spite of criticisms that I will fry my clutch, but have not had any clutch problems whatsoever or any other symptoms of any kind using the car oil.



The MCN article did mention that some phosphate compound had a little benefit in racing motors run at redline. However, those engines only need to make it through one racing season before being rebuilt. So, I don't know if you get to run one additional race with the additive or not. It's irrelevant to me.
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Old 11-21-2005, 08:42 AM   #62
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Default Re: Snake Oil, Revisited

I think STP works in old car motors that need to be rebuilt or junked to get an additional few thousand miles out of them. But, STP also make a lot of other products, of which I'm sure are only useful in lightening your wallet.
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Old 11-21-2005, 08:49 AM   #63
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Default Re: Snake Oil, Revisited

The synthetics have longer chain molecules that adhere to metal a little longer. The real advantage of them is that you can leave a motor sit for a longer period of time and starte it up with less damage than non-synthetic oils. I've noticed how slippery the synthetics are when disassembling motors. Also, the assembly lube used when motors are put back together is grease, not oil, so it sticks to the bearing surfaces until the machine is completely assembled in the bike and started up.



That's what you really want - a thick grease film at the surface of the bearing, but be able to circulate it in an oil system. Unfortunately, you can't have both.
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Old 11-21-2005, 08:54 AM   #64
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Default Re: Snake Oil, Revisited

My '92 electraglide went 75k miles on plain old Harley oil, which is about $2.75 per quart and cheaper than the motorcycle oils they sell at the car parts stores. What happened at 75k miles? One of the lifters' wheel bearing failed - not necessarily oil related.
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Old 11-21-2005, 09:00 AM   #65
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Default Re: Orville oil

They probably aren't smoking anywhere near as much as a cigarette chain smoker.
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Old 11-21-2005, 11:41 AM   #66
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Default Re: Snake Oil, Revisited

Diesel specific oils are the best way to go. They are made with the best base stocks and have superior additive packages (Rotella, Delo, Delvac). Synthetics are fine if you want to extend your oil change interval. Other than that they offer no benefits (based on long-term tests). Viscosity breakdown does occur, but engine makers know about this and specify an oil viscosity that will work well even if you skip the occasional oil change (or two).



There's more myth than science out there about products that are tested extensively all the time. I know of no one who has ever had a failure that was traced to "bad oil".
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Old 11-21-2005, 01:26 PM   #67
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Default A Good Word for STP

I use a 50-50 mix of STP and whatever motor oil I happen to have around to coat parts for re-assembly. Works great! Sticks to the parts forever so you donÂ’t get all wigged-out if you donÂ’t have time to put everything back together right away. You donÂ’t use much, so it lasts a long time. IÂ’m still getting mine out of a metal can with a church-key hole in the top! WouldnÂ’t recommend putting it in a crankcase, thoughÂ….



For the record, IÂ’ve used Castrol GTX in motorcycles for more than 30 years with excellent results. I donÂ’t have a lot of experience with modern, high specific output engines, but so far (24k) it seems to be doing the job in my SuperHawk. ItÂ’s cheap, so it doesnÂ’t hurt the wallet to change it often. And you can get it everywhere, which is satisfying for those of us that still believe the old wifeÂ’s tale about not mixing brands of oil.



So heed the words to the wise from our man Fred (and his cronies at MCN): "Buy a quality, brand-name oil, in the proper viscosity rating for your bike. Change it regularly, along with the filter, and quit worrying about it."

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Old 11-21-2005, 02:55 PM   #68
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Default Re: Oil is Oil!

There was a rally-car event in South America where after fixing the oil leak in a Citroen, there were only bananas available, no oil of any kind. So they mashed lots of bananas into the motor and were able to finish the event. I read about this in Road & Track in the 1960s or thereabouts.

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Old 11-21-2005, 06:31 PM   #69
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Default !Re: Snake Oil, Revisited

Regarding Lycoming: odd that you would mention the one engine manufacturer who *requires* an engine oil additive be used in certain of their engines. In fact, the FAA requires the addtive use! Yes, with every oil change one must add Lycoming engine oil additive to regular aviation oil to help minimize camshaft wear rates and catastrophic engine failure! Sooo, Lycoming DOES recognize, require additive use.

I am NOT an additive user, recomender, etc. Just a nit picking lube engineer...

George, Columbus, Ohio
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Old 11-22-2005, 02:22 AM   #70
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Default Re: Snake Oil, Revisited

I totally disagree. I saw a large european car mag oil test, very scientifically done, couple of years back and the verdict was clear: synthetic is clearly, so much clearly better by many a criteria. For example viscosity resistance to extreme temperatures was out of an other planet. Also capability to resist seizing in extreme conditions was much better. You want to keep that mirror polish on your valve stems, synthetic is the way to go.



- cruiz-euro
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