Go Back   Motorcycle Forum > Motorcycle.Com General Discussion > Motorcycle News > Old News > MO Reader Feedback

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-22-2005, 06:52 AM   #11
pattonme
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 170
Default Re: Buying a Motorcycle: Part III

is is RARE to find a salesman who even rides. The only qualification they need for hte job is prior sales experience. Selling lampshades qualifies.
pattonme is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links Remove Advertisements
Motorcycle Forum
Advertisement
Old 09-22-2005, 07:06 AM   #12
Marin_Cycleworks
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 33
Default Re: Buying a Motorcycle: Part III

So you're a motorcycle website publisher, and you want to hire a feature writer. While writers will try to get you to pay them a living wage, here's how to get them to work for you for nearly nothing. Just like a motorcycle dealership, they don't really need to be able to pay their rent, utilities or anything else. Don't let these writers take advantage of you - read on as we show you how to make them back down on their wages...
Marin_Cycleworks is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2005, 07:15 AM   #13
travisyoung
Founding Member
 
travisyoung's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 113
Default Re: Buying a Motorcycle: Part III

I would never spend 4-5 hours in a dealership talking about buying a motorcycle or a car. Why do it if you can get the same price in 20 minutes.



I think I spent about ten minutes buying my last car...I knew what I wanted, knew how much it cost and made a reasonable offer. The dealer made a reasonable counteroffer within 2 minutes, I wrote the check and we were done. It probably helps that it was a Saab dealership versus some larger more traditional dealer.



Granted some dealers just can't or won't do a deal that quickly, but I don't have to deal with them.
travisyoung is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2005, 07:39 AM   #14
mikenomad
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 361
Default Re: Gap Insurance

Gap insurance protects the lender. If the bike is totalled and the borrower's main insurance policy doesn't cover the full amount still owed, the gap insurance covers the difference.
mikenomad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2005, 08:02 AM   #15
naco_traficante
Registered Member
 
naco_traficante's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 466
Default Re: Buying a Motorcycle: Part III

Gabe - your insider knowledge is like gold.

It's like a magician telling all of his tricks.

As far as the art goes ... keep your day job.
naco_traficante is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2005, 08:13 AM   #16
Tigercub
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,125
Default Re: Buying a Motorcycle: Part III

There is no excuse for not knowing what a bike should cost and no reason to spend more than about an hour in the dealership. Something's wrong if you're in there that long.



Pay cash for a bike. Get your own financing. Don't waste time with a dealer loan. If you can't afford a new bike, don't buy one. There is much less risk buying used these days.



The one problem I have had is that the dealerships (mostly cars) don't get that I'm going to pay cash for the car. I guess know one does that.



I always know what I'm willing to pay for a bike. If I really want it I'll pay up to MSRP, out the door. I did pay slightly over MSRP for a Harley in '92 (out the door). Just make a reasonble low offer and they will tell you eventually if they accept it or not. I've always been within a couple hundred bucks of what I was willing to pay for cars and bikes. You just have to be patient with the dealership to figure out if they can sell at your offer. I usually loose my patience and start to walk out until they come back with an answer - any answer fer chrisakes, just tell me if you want to sell it!!!

Tigercub is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2005, 08:14 AM   #17
Tigercub
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,125
Default Re: Buying a Motorcycle: Part III

There you go - I'm with you.
Tigercub is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2005, 08:21 AM   #18
Tigercub
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 1,125
Default Re:

Early '70s superbike? I think he was referring to Norton/BSA/Triumphs, not Kawasaki 900s and Honda 750s. I still have my Triumph 650 Tiger and ride it regularly. It requires a lot more from me than any bike made today, but is more satisfying in many ways. I often take it to work instead of my new Hinckley Triumph -so boring. Jap bikes? Wake me when this nightmare is over and the British Empire rules again.
Tigercub is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2005, 08:27 AM   #19
cptaebphd
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 208
Default Re: Buying a Motorcycle: Part III

I'm the same. Know the bike I want, get a good OTD price, pay cash, pick it up that weekend. I just won't play with salespeople anymore -- not worth my time. I'm happy to give the dealership a decent profit for the few minutes they spend with me to buy a bike.



The eternal quest for the absolute, rock bottom price has no value to me anymore....I'm old.....and my honey-do list is long....
cptaebphd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-22-2005, 08:48 AM   #20
sqidbait
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 170
Default Re: Buying a Motorcycle: Part III

I find it funny that a dealer would complain about Gabe's article. He simply presented a factual guide as to how new bike purchases flow, so that the novice buyer isn't completely overwhelmed during the negotiation process.



I guess the good folks at Marin Cycleworks would rather have their customers totally unprepared. I guess it sure makes it easier to charge inflated shipping and setup fees, eh?



-- Michael

sqidbait is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off