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Old 08-19-2004, 09:03 AM   #71
mscuddy
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Default Re: Yeah, well

Chain spooie is the only thing holding my bikes together.



Never, ever wipe it off.
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Old 08-19-2004, 09:06 AM   #72
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Default Re: 2004 Kawasaki Z750

What about that 650 twin back in the 60's that looked like a Matchless?
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Old 08-19-2004, 09:46 AM   #73
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Default Re: 2004 Kawasaki Z750

I hate to say this. Perhaps a higher quality set of brakes than that which comes standard on Harley Davidsons would fix the problem (at great expense). Most high systems do slightly retract the pistons when pressure is released. (This post is not intended to be a flame, I'm just stating that HD brake components are of mediocre design and execution.) -Sean
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Old 08-19-2004, 09:51 AM   #74
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Default Re: Hold up there shippie

I have to disagree. True Soichiro's crowning glory was a six. However it happened about 15 years earlier, with the RC 165 250cc six, that made the world's hair stand on end as it neared its 19,000 rpm redline. (his 22,000 rpm 125cc inline 5 didn't sound too shabby either) -Sean
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Old 08-19-2004, 10:02 AM   #75
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Default Re: Hold up there shippie

Is that the one Mike Hailwood raced?

if so you're right. I'd give mscuddy's left nut for a ride on that one.
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Old 08-19-2004, 10:05 AM   #76
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Default Hey!

I had one of those. I bought in Japan in '71 and shipped it home. The bike was patterned after the pre-unit construction BSA 650. Unlike the BSA it had Mikuni carbs and Nippondenso electrics and ran quite reliably. Oh yes it was a copy but the copy was vastly superior to the original since it was built out of high quality steel instead of the crappy Brit domestic steel.



I chopped it and then restored it after wrecking the fork in a crash. I had if for 10 years and must have put 70K on it. The compression was so bad by that time that I could start it by hand by pushing the kickstarter. It caught on fire after backfiring through the carbs and I junked it after that.



Try getting 70K out of a 60's BSA engine... without a single top end job.

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Old 08-19-2004, 10:06 AM   #77
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Default Re: Well,

Ok, maybe that one.
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Old 08-19-2004, 10:31 AM   #78
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Default Re: 2004 Kawasaki Z750

Preload effects spring reaction. Rebound damping exists to control spring action. Ergo, adjusting preload means adjustmens in rebound are a good idea. Compression also effects spring action, but to a lesser extent.
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Old 08-19-2004, 10:36 AM   #79
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Default Re: 2004 Kawasaki Z750

Sorry to hear that. What did you dislike about your Z? Mine's tranny shifts fine. Actually, I have little to complain about.



Why did you like the 919 better? I rode one once, but it was 1.5 years before I got my Z, so I can't compare them. I do remember likng it better than my 99 F4.
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Old 08-19-2004, 01:07 PM   #80
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Default Re: 2004 Kawasaki Z750

Hey now, 73HP ain't so shabby for a air-cooled 2-valver at the rear wheel. Yes, it's heavier than it should be at 475lbs. But it does use the ages old KZ/GPz motors and an all-steel frame.



Slap a shock on it (Wilburs makes a good one) and put 95-97 ZX6R forks on the thing and she rock and rolls. Why budget bikes have to have crap for suspension I don't know. And the ZX6e/6R brakes bolt right up so instead of the wooden feeling sliding 2-pin I have 4 pot calipers. *zoot*



And fully adjustable suspension is absolutely wonderful to have. Whoever said you could do everything you needed just by changing preload and messing with fork oil clearly does not live in IL nor has their bike pull double duty: commuter and track weapon. Damper-rod forks pretty much blow and are beyond rescue. I tried. I put the semi-adjustable ZX6e forks on the ZR-7 and used Racetech GVE's too. Give me a screw driver and a half dozen clicks any day.
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