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Old 11-08-2003, 02:53 PM   #41
cyclesteve
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Default Re: Bike rules

Also try the Brit rags Ride and Two Wheels Only. Expensive, yes and worth it
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Old 11-08-2003, 03:28 PM   #42
awacs
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Default Re: Living with the VFR

Hi, Nice write up. january 2000: I wanted to want a Triumph Sprint ST, really I did. The VFR won me over inside of a block. Great bike. If it's a bit heavy, you won't know it from the way you can chuck it into all but the tightest turns where, ok, it's not your buddy's R6. Comfortable on the long slogs, happy anywhere in the rev band. Nice looking, too, I think.



Couple of negatives, though, and I'm surprised these haven't come up yet. A significant subset of these bikes - mine, unfortunately - get crap for mileage. I get 32 - 34 MPG (US), on commutes where I never see the fun side of 7000 RPMs. Sport rides, never mind! Bleeding the linked brakes is ... well.....



Otherwise great bikes. Stone reliable (save up for a replacement voltage regulator, that's about it), and if you doubt it's sporting intentions, go look up some old pictures of Reg Pridmore....
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Old 11-08-2003, 04:27 PM   #43
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Default Re: Living with the VFR

Finally, an article where the motorcycle is the center of attention. Great job.
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Old 11-08-2003, 05:24 PM   #44
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Default Really? Nah.

The post wasn't meant to be exciting; I don't write exciting posts. I know that. Now you know that.



Since you asked, I bought a '99 R1100RS. New BMWs are too pricey and a well maintained one will keep going, so buying used makes sense. With the adjustable seat and handlebars I could make it fit my lanky frame. The VFR was almost right, but would have needed parts. RS with great bags, heated grips, and fits me compared to a deservedly praised VFR, but needing many $$$ to make it similar. Do I have to say, "no brainer," or are you there already?



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Old 11-09-2003, 04:15 AM   #45
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Default Re: Living with the VFR

Hello,



Very good points are made. As an ower of two current Duc's one being an 04 Multistrada I can appriacite a real world write up.



Manufacturers need to compete in this segment with much more effort and attention.





Sandro
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Old 11-09-2003, 04:44 AM   #46
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Default Re: Living with the VFR

Stone reliable bikes don't eat voltage regulators

I'm obviously in the minority here but I found the '97 VFR I had to be pretty un-reliable, going through 2 voltage regulators in 40k miles.

The Suzuki Bandit I traded it for was stone reliable, nothing failed or broke in the almost 40k I owned it. My current Triumph has 10k miles since June without a hic-up.
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Old 11-09-2003, 08:24 AM   #47
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Default Re: Living with the VFR

Gear driven cams in the VFR date back further than the RC45. The RC30 and the 1986 VFR750 had 'em also. None of these would be described as "bevel drive camshafts". Although not exclusive to Ducati, their bevel gear driven camshaft engines are probably the most commonly known. This was the system they used before they went to belt drive on the Pantah based engines.
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Old 11-09-2003, 08:37 AM   #48
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Default Re: Really? Nah.

Fascinating. You really are a clever, lanky framed fellow. But you forgot to mention the ease of maintenance and shaft drive advantages of the BMW. Fact is, these two bikes aren't very comparable. Sure they both fit under the "sport touring" umbrella but they have significant differences. They are what they are. You sound like you belong on a BMW. Enjoy the ride!
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Old 11-09-2003, 09:38 AM   #49
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Default Ruffled feathers?

Call it like I see it. The last Honda I owned was a 1980 CB900F. It was good for 33,000 miles. Everytime I washed it or there was a rain storm the engine would start running on only 2 or 3 of the 4 cylinders. Sure I've got an impact driver but it should of come with something other then phillips head screws the way I look at it. Strictly disposable like most of those old pieces of crap. Only worth about a dollar a cc after awhile. Sure the new bikes are much better, I'm sure, but most are still disposable. These magazines, both online and print make sure of that. According to them, unless you have this year's model you're missing the boat. Most of you jap riding yahoos haven't figured out how they make sure that each bike has all different parts that won't work on any other model so that you can't ever buy after market. Try rebuilding a carb on a 10 to 20 year old Honda. The dealer will want 25 bucks for each little piece. Cost more than you could ever sell the bike for. Unless you feel you have some classic then you can't cost justify rebuilding most of these bikes. As for the comment about never having to work on one then either you aren't putting any miles on it or you let everything go. Probably ride around with a milk crate for a tour pak. Oh yeah, after finding out what it would cost me to rebuild that CB900 myself, I parked it on the back porch where it sat for 10 years. I finally gave it to a Mexican roofer for doing a good shingling job.
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Old 11-09-2003, 09:42 AM   #50
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Default Bevel Drive

I saw an old duc twin at Bragg Creek (bike hangout west of calgary) it had what looked like a shaft-driven valvetrain. I couldn't find the owner to ask him about it, but there was a visible shaft running up from the crankcase with crown gears connecting it to the camshaft. There was a little window where you could see the gears. Is this what you're referring to?
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