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Old 11-12-2003, 08:36 AM   #91
HOV
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Default Re: Living with the VFR

Well, I'd have to say that the YZF600R is more than a match for anything the VFR can do. Touring, sporting, whatever. Fully adjustable suspension, R1-derived 4-piston brakes, mid 90's HP, couch-style seat, excellent wind protection, and 50 mpg.



Plus, the Thundercat costs $3k less.
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Old 11-12-2003, 09:43 AM   #92
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Default Re: Living with the VFR

Totally agree....and disagree. For my money I'll stick with my '98 YZF 600R. It's more the capable of playing with the big dogs on weekend runs thru Texas hill country and has taken me to Michigan and back twice and California more times than I can remember. And to top it all off, no BS, I get 45 to 50 mpg on road trips. More than once I've ridden 200 plus miles between fill-ups. Now if I could have two bikes.....the new Duke and and a FJR would be sitting in my garage.



Lee
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Old 11-13-2003, 03:31 AM   #93
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Default Re: Living with the VFR

For your temp issue you could place a nice looking electric switch on your dash area to operate the fan.....if you know you are heading for traffic, just flip the switch before the temp raises....helps many I know.



Chris
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Old 11-13-2003, 05:21 AM   #94
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Default Re: Living with the VFR

Lee,



You are obviously a man of taste. The FJR is a fine moto and the KTM is just incredible. My last mount was an LC4 640; I really enjoyed the quality of the engine and suspension, and can only imagine how much a$$ the new KTM hauls. Only problem with KTMs is that they have strange things go bad on them, like clutch cables, rotting fuel line rubber, etc. The oil changes also were quite burdensome.
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Old 11-13-2003, 07:16 PM   #95
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Default Re: Living with the VFR

Thanks for the info on the Concours; appreciated.
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Old 11-14-2003, 05:01 AM   #96
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Default Re: Wolf

OK so you've got an old CB750F (single overhead cam) That's a 1976, '77, or '78 bike. As I recall, Honda stuck a hotter cam in there someplace to try and squeeze a little more power out of the design which dates back to 1969, the original 750 four. That did lead to a little more wear and tear on the valve train. Bad Honda!! And it had those awful Phillips head screws also!



You lose the bet over the 100,000km 900 Custom. It never had motor work in that time. Why are you wasting your money on Mobil 1 and pouring it down the drain at 3000miles? Trying to delay the inevitable meltdown?



You want to start an urban legend about some Harley bonehead who claims he could set the valves on a single cam Honda in 15 to 20 minutes? What a load of crap!



Saddle up the Hog, get out on the streets and do some profiling. It'll help you forget about those damned Phillips screws.
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Old 11-14-2003, 06:29 PM   #97
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Default Re: Ruffled feathers?

I know it's tough to tell your vast experience of motorcycling in a few sentences. But your statement about doing more work on your Honda's, Beemers and Yamahas deserves a little more detail. 2003 less 46 years takes us back to 1957. Now assuming you started on a new bike (most people don't) you either had a very early Honda or a BMW. And we all know Honda didn't make a "big bike" until the 750 four of 1969. Yamaha didn't make a "big bike" (if we can even call it big) until the 650 twin was introduced in 1970. So maybe you were riding BMW's through the 1960's? Whatever, you never jumped on the Harley bandwagon until post 1985, the year the mighty EVO was introduced. It's generally recognized that the EVO was quite an improvement over the previous models. Doesn't say much for the previous models does it? At that point in history Harley had been making bikes for 82 years for crissake! Also, check out the prices of the Hondas and Yamahas you were riding. Bet they were a little cheaper than a Harley. Not really a fair comparison is it? So what's the point of saying your Harleys were so dependable compared to the other bikes. They don't compare cost wise and they're from different time periods. Kind of like comparing a mid sixties Chevy Nova to a 1988 (insert your favourite, reliable, expensive, American built car here)
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Old 11-15-2003, 01:09 PM   #98
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Default Re: Living with the VFR

I really thought this was a great article. I have an ST1300 and would love to get an opinion on how different the two bikes are, the VFR and the ST1300...
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Old 12-03-2003, 06:50 PM   #99
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Default Re: Living with the VFR

Not to start one of those idiotic pissing contests, but I'm a pretty experienced rider, and don't really need ABS, but I can see what the advantage would be to having all that hi tech stuff. I have a 95, which doesn't have the ABS, and it's got pretty damn sudden brakes. The problem was made worse by flaccid brake hoses, which I fixed with SS braided lines, and it's still a one or two finger deal to lock up the front. It's ok when I'm riding all the time and I'm used to it, but, like most people I don't get out as often as I would like, and it takes a while to get my feel for traction back.
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Old 12-04-2003, 10:05 AM   #100
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Default Re: Good read

Cheap engineering? Fasteners are not engineering, they are fasteners. Engineering is manipulating materials to do your bidding. Motorcycle engines are supposed to make power and not break and, believe it or not, a few advances have been made in the last 75 years. It's actually possible now to just push a button and have the engine roar to life and settle into a smooth idle, and, as soon as you have your helmet (you know, those things that sometimes save your life if you go down; and you will) snugged down and put your gloves on, you can just ride away. You don't need a piece of cardboard under the engine any more either.
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