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Old 04-16-2003, 04:08 PM   #71
zelatore
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Default Re: '03 600s, Part II: On the Dirty Boulevard...

The guys above have said it all...My '00 Sprint RS will roll to 36K miles next week and I've only had one problem-a leaky fuel injector covered under warrenty caused a low RPM rough running situation. It's being diferent made easy.

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Old 04-16-2003, 04:20 PM   #72
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Default Re: '03 600s, Part II: On the Dirty Boulevard...

In part 1 JB comments that Triumph did not have the latest toy for them to play with, but was willing to let MO have at it with the Speed 4 that was available despite knowing it wouldn't be the best thing for this comparo...kudos to Triumph for puttin' it out there!
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Old 04-17-2003, 03:46 AM   #73
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Default Re: Buell, however, has a LOT of rotational inertia

Ah, interesting point, I stand corrected



I remember my first bike, a Kawasaki 550 LTD (chopper-wannabe), which was noticibly harder to persuade to change direction as speed increased due to it's heavy cast-iron wheels (and general steering geometry). I had the impression I could really feel the gyroscopic effect of those heavy wheels. I haven't experienced it on any bike since.



It did respond well to counter-steering, probably for the same reason.



Funny how movement over 1 additional axis makes it that much more complicated and interesting.
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Old 04-17-2003, 07:30 AM   #74
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Default Re: Buell, however, has a LOT of rotational inertia

Trail, baby, trail. It's all about how far behind the axis you're swinging that wheel. You can have a zero-degree headtube and a lot of trail, and the bike will still won't tank slap. It'll turn quickly, but once you lose the front, it's gone, you can't turn it "in" to the ground with zero degrees and "pick" the bike "up" with it. While leaned way over, with more than zero of a head tube angle, think of the front wheel as "flopping" around out front -- like a chopper, the farther you turn the handlebars, the more the front of the wheel comes down into contact with the road, both lengthing the chassis and raising the front end relative to the new, leaned-over horizon (the latter puts more weight on the front wheel), thus, you have recourse when the front end pushes.



And, THE ABOVE IS TRUE. Buell front ends are heavy. We haven't weighed a new Firebolt one, but the GSX-R 750 front forks and dual disk brakes we used on our racebikes were some 10 pounds lighter than the stock Buell. Every piece was lighter, the wheel, the brake rotors (yes, two small rotors were lighter than one big one, think R^2), the forks, everything. Especially the axle. If anyone is dying to know, we can go downstairs and weigh just the wheel/brake/tire combos of a GSX-R Vs. a Buell front wheel.
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Old 04-17-2003, 07:44 AM   #75
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Default Re: '03 600s, Part II: On the Dirty Boulevard...

Rsheidler, you got a point about Yamaha's race record. Everyone is talking about Kawasaki's recent success, but nobody has bothered to mention that Team Yamaha is opening up a huge lead in points in the supersport class on the R6. The R6 looked especially impressive at Fontana might I add, Dominating with 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 5th place finishes....
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Old 04-17-2003, 03:04 PM   #76
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Default Re: '03 600s, Part II: On the Dirty Boulevard...

there with ya!!!
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Old 04-18-2003, 04:28 PM   #77
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Default Re: '03 600s, Part II: On the Dirty Boulevard...

You couldn't have hit that one on the nose any better.
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Old 04-18-2003, 04:46 PM   #78
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Default Re: '03 600s, Part II: On the Dirty Boulevard...

I got mine two weeks ago also and absolutely love it. I spent the first week getting the suspension tweaked right and now it's awesome!!!! Interestingly I have had no problems with the seat or tankslapping. I had a 2002 zx6r and the front end of the new one is definitely quicker and more alive but I haven't had any head shake. Maybe I just have been lucky so far. Your right though, the scotts damper is the best one.
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Old 04-18-2003, 05:16 PM   #79
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Default Re: '03 600s, Part II: On the Dirty Boulevard...

If you don't mind, what exactly do you mean when you say, "getting the suspension tweaked". Is this something you did yourself or had a mechanic do for you? Don't want to get personal here, but, are your privates getting smashed against the tank like I've heard others complain? Maybe, the nut crunch has something to do with the size of the rider involved.
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Old 04-19-2003, 05:31 PM   #80
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Default Re: '03 600s, Part II: On the Dirty Boulevard...

well I don't want to give the impression that I'm under sized in that region but, no I haven't had that problem. I think it's because my arms are on the longer side and I can sit back on the seat and still comfortably reach the bars. As far as tweaking the suspension, there are standard ways of setting up suspension based on weight and riding style. you can log onto sportbike.com and go to there suspension set up section. This is a good start to use if your not familiar with setting sag, compression and rebound. There suggestions are just that and you will have to fine toon it for yourself. No one can set your suspension just right for you except you. If you don't know anything about it use sportbike.com's sugg. and then make small adjustments in one place at a time till it works and feels right for you.
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