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Old 08-29-2002, 08:47 AM   #131
wolfspiritt
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Default Re: Shadow 750 vs 883R Reader Feedback

I liked the article and can identify with some of the shortcomings of the Shadow since I own one.



That being said the seat problem was solved with a dremel, some sand paper, a box of T50 staples and about 45 minutes of reshaping.



The acceleration and performance were improved dramatically by replacing the standard 42T rear sprocket with a 38T, rejetting and properly adjusting the fuel mixture screws. Seems Honda can't follow their own manuals and the Honda is sent out of the factory running too lean.



I don't have canyons where I live but lots of backwoods twisties and the Shadow hauls butt through them pretty well. All that being said it is not a Harley but at least it always starts!
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Old 08-29-2002, 08:49 AM   #132
wolfspiritt
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Default Re: Shadow 750 vs 883R Reader Feedback

"P.S. : With a set of Cobra pipes & jet kit it's really not such a pathetic ride."



Actually cut the resonators out and rejet and you get about 90% of that for a tenth of the cost.
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Old 08-29-2002, 08:53 AM   #133
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Default Re: Shadow 750 vs 883R Reader Feedback

Longride,



Yup, they opened the class to modified street bikes this year, my error. BTW, if you read the rules you will see that the bikes that were added all have restrictors in the intake, just a little bigger than the XR750 and RS 750s. If I promise to be very impressed that a dedicated race bikes with decades of development, i.e. RS 750s and XR 750s, are beating street bikes some guy built into a dirttracker in his garage or the back of a bike shop can we get back to the original question?



The question was (I am paraphrasing here) "Why don't the Hondas kick the Harley's ass any more". Your answer (again, paraphrasing) "The rules never changed, the Harleys improved", is just not correct. I pointed out the fact that the AMA has taken the Honda's power advantage and that is the real reason the RS 750 and the Harleys are about equal now. You have never addressed the restrictors, you just keep taking about converted street bikes.



Lets put it this way, if the FIM required all bikes in WSB to run 33 MM restrictors do you think the four cylinder bikes would be "improved" at the next race? I'm pretty sure the fours would win, and they would be improved because racers are always improving their bikes. But the facts would still show any improvements the four cylinder guys made would be secondary to the changes caused by the restrictors.



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Old 08-29-2002, 09:33 AM   #134
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Default Re: Uh-Oh!.....

Hmm, thank you for your reply. It was flippant but condecending,



So your whole premise (and excuse) for the existance of HD bashers is.......drum roll......because HD is in fact holding back the development of "useful technology" that will improve motorcycles and the "entire motorcycling community"



Now that's funny.



*Sigh,* As I said maybe, just maybe some people actually buy HD's based on their own (albeit, ill-informed), opinions, because that's what they want in a scooter. *Sigh*



BTW, sorry I didn't get personal as you expected.
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Old 08-29-2002, 10:01 AM   #135
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Default Re: Shadow 750 vs 883R Reader Feedback

Let's see, since I'm the one who made the comments regarding cruiser functionality which you have so conveniently quoted above in your 11:39:27 PDT reply (and therefore I have no need to repeat), logic would dictate that I actually DO understand the crux of the debate...



You miss my point, which was to deconstruct the stereotypical thinking that defines the mainstream arguments denigrating cruiser functionality, which were pretty much trotted out here as gospel by yourself and a couple other posters.



Also, you still haven't defined how generalized "cruisers" (YOUR generalization, remember) are poorly engineered, OR designed.



I would welcome your detailed reasons - as you may have assumed I do enjoy a good debate - but would remind you to heed my additional heretical points made the dependance of functionality on the operating environment, and rider expertise...



to illustrate my point, and edify somewhat, I pose a few questions:



at a standstill, at a stoplight, cruiser and sportbike side by side...which one is exhibiting superior function?



same two bikes: begiining rider on the sportbike, experienced rider on the cruiser.



the begining rider decks the footpeg, scares him (or her)self, panics, stands the bike up on the brakes, and countersteers off the road.



cruiser rider decks the footpeg/footboard, which sets up a weave, but the rider keeps pressure on the inside handle bar and applies throttle knowing shaft effect will get the ground clearance up and leans it around the turn a bit more...



which bike has exhibited superior function?



same two bikes: equivalent riders...at a track day...two laps in, the cruisers brakes are overheated, and the rider has to slow significantly to let them cool off. sport bike maintains speed, and it's brakes stay solid throughout the lapping session.



which bike has exhibited superior function?



same two bikes, equivalent riders, comfortable evening ride for fun. traffic is light, and a few clear areas occur, and both bikes are able to maintain generally equivalent pace due to road and traffic conditions, sometimes the sportbike is ahead, sometimes the cruiser...



which bike is exhibiting superior function?



I welcome your debate.
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Old 08-29-2002, 10:02 AM   #136
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Default Re: Shadow 750 vs 883R Reader Feedback

Hello all,



I am the proud owner of a 2002 H-D 883R.

I purchased it back in March and have enjoyed putting over 6000 miles on it so far.



Why did I go with this particular motorcycle? Well, I wasn't planning on it initially. I had been looking for a ride that I could use for commuting, running to the store on, weekend get-aways, and just having fun on.



I have had several older (pre-80's Honda and Suzuki) street bikes and wanted something new, but wouldn't break the bank. After looking at the Suzuki Bandit 1200, SV650, Kawasaki ZR-7, Ducati Monstors, and others (never did ride the Shadow), I just couldn't find a bike that had the right feel to it. I happen to be one of those vertically challenged types and most motorcycles of worth-while cubic inches were too tall in the saddle.



A buddy let me take his Sportster for a spin and after attracting some female attention on it I had to swing by the Harley dealer for a closer look at the options they could provide.



After taking the Sportster 1200 for a ride and haggling the price, I decided it was too much dough. Yes, it seems list price and actual are two different things to Harley Davidson.



I ended up buying the 883R after they installed a Vance & Hines Pro Pipe, Screaming Eagle Air Cleaner, and rejetting the carb, and still was quite a bit cheaper than the 1200.

The V & H 2 into 1 exhaust sounds SWEET! Not the typical "potato-potato" that most Harleys make, but more of a "whump-whump" as both cylinders are dumped out the single pipe. Bassy enough to chirp some auto alarms as I idle past.



The dyno chart seems a bit low to me. I thought I had seen one that listed the 883 as around 50hp and torque. Whatever it is, it's still enough to hit triple digits on the speedo.



I do know that the gas mileage listed is low. I'm getting between 50-53mpg consistantly with a mix of hiway and city (and twisties) driving.

I do a fair amount of 70+ riding and other than the lack of wind protection and a bit more vibration it handles it just fine! It would be nice to have a sixth gear though...



Bottom line is: One motorcycle will never fit all of your cyling needs no matter how much it costs. Those of us that don't have unlimited funds must make certain sacrifices and still enjoy the ride. So far, I'm still enjoying mine!



When the warranty runs out, I'll be enjoying it even more after installing a fork dampening kit and converting it from 883cc to 1200cc. ~
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Old 08-29-2002, 10:20 AM   #137
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Default Re: motorcycling websites, comments, mini reviews

Thanks for that list of sites - I didn't know about them!



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Old 08-29-2002, 10:22 AM   #138
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Default Re: Uh-Oh!.....

Yes, right on target again. Nothing to say and lots of words to say it. Our previous post exchanges jujst proved you to be the a$$hole you still are. You can make fun of me all you like. It only proves that a little boy like you behind a computer can be a somebody in his own little mind.
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Old 08-29-2002, 10:23 AM   #139
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Default Re: Uh-Oh!.....

Yeah I said your name....
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Old 08-29-2002, 11:16 AM   #140
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Default Re: Funny thing...

Oops--sorry 'bout assuming you're female! At 23, you're young enough to carry that name well.



Interesting point you raise also about the average Harley age. Although I'm 40+ (exercise & genes make me look much younger), I think I'll have to stay away from Harleys unless I win the lottery. I'm shopping for a cruiser to replace my current--an '81 kawi 250kz. Nebraska has such a short riding season, that paying big $$ for any bike is ridiculous unless I have money to burn. I want a bit more power (maybe 600cc), & nimble handling for around-town and short road trips. But I'd like it not so weighty that I can't control it on stops on hills. That scares me! I'm not sure how to handle hill-stops on bikes any heavier than the kawi. It specs at 290lbs dry weight. I'm on my third riding season, yet I still have to focus REALLY HARD not to kill it when taking off from a dead stop on a hill. I took the riding course, & usually use their recommended "hill-takeoff" technique--foot on brake while at the same time releasing the clutch/throttling. I can sometimes do this using the hand brake instead of the foot brake. If anyone has suggestions, please advise--thanks!



So far every bike I spec that's around 600cc weighs at least 500 lbs. I'd like to see them make a mid-power cruiser for lightweights that want to have fun.

_______________

Thanks, MO, for the review--very pertinent reading for me.
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