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Old 08-07-2002, 02:49 AM   #31
FloridaSteve
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Default Re: Restoration Without the Exploration

Sounds Awsome....If You'd like to sell it, Let me know. I'd buy it in a second....
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Old 08-07-2002, 04:50 AM   #32
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Default Re: Restoration Without the Exploration

A friend of mine owned a 1975 H1. By that time the engine had been detuned a bit, down to around 54 HP, as I recall. The powerband was far less abrupt and the bike really wasn't that unpleasant.



Most of the Japanese bikes were lousy handlers during those years. I had a '76 CB750F that was a real pig compared to a Norton.



The nostaligia of those bikes is entertaining, but spending 6K+ to restore a Kawasaki triple is IMHO a waste of money. A vastly superior choice would be an RD350 or R5 Yammerhammer. Kasaki's 350 triple was hopelessly outclassed by the Yamaha.



P.S. http://www.b3ta.com/motorbikes/
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Old 08-07-2002, 05:43 AM   #33
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Default Re: Restoration Without the Exploration

Restoration advice: for your own good, buy something already restored, and then just keep fixing it! The up-front costs will look scary, but you'll save thousands of dollars, guaranteed.



Secondly, buy in the fall and sell in the spring. Seems like common sense, but there is no such thing as common sense, espacially among enthusiests (I started the BSA restoration project by finding a beautiful European model BSA fuel tank that needed a bike to which to bolt).



After restoring a '67 BSA, I bought my '46 Royal Enfield G350 in running, working, fixed order, and saved huge money.



Do I listen to my own advice? Somewhat. I don't buy rusty sports-cars to fix anymore; that's insanity. The '80 Fiat 2000 Spyder I just picked-up cheap is solid, and needs paint, TLC, and a head-gasket (all Fiats need headgaskets and timing belts immediatly upon purchase).



Sure wish I still had that G350...
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Old 08-07-2002, 05:51 AM   #34
Gordy
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Default Re: Restoration Without the Exploration

The best way to experience one of the

kawi triples was like this:

Having a few beers

Buddy's buddy comes by with his ratty 750 (ported, pipes, lots of piston slap)

Take it for a ride (shorts, tennis shoes, no shirt. did I mention beers?)

Give 'er a good twist in second in the middle of town - lights up the 4" rear tire, snaps up the front wheel. The swingarm bushings are worn out so a good crossed up tire spinning wheelie.

Go back home shakin' like a leaf. That's riding!

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Old 08-07-2002, 05:58 AM   #35
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Default Re: Restoration Without the Exploration

Hey, now! Give us old guys some slack. We can't smoke any more or, if we do, we can't breath. We let the bike smoke for us. Our backs are giving out so we gotta be careful with the girlies. We can't remember recent events, but our brains still let us think that those bikes were good. We'll be gone soon enough so please allow us to live in our demented world for a wee bit longer. (If I rode anything but a toad my heart would explode)
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Old 08-07-2002, 06:10 AM   #36
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Default Re: Restoration Without the Exploration

mutton head
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Old 08-07-2002, 11:14 AM   #37
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1979. Everybody was a mutton head.
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Old 08-07-2002, 01:20 PM   #38
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Default Re: Restoration Without the Exploration

Yikes...looking at that bike reminded me of my first ride -- a 1971 Kawasaki 90...Same color scheme, smoke, etc. I rode that scoot throughout Washington D.C. during the winter and traded up to a Honda CB 350 in the spring...The 90 had just enough power to get me where I was going, but not enough power to make me feel safe on the road. But I loved that particular shade of red. What I really wanted was the 750, but I'd heard a lot of stories about how the 750 was a "killer bike" -- just too hot for the road. Great article
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Old 08-07-2002, 04:48 PM   #39
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Default OK, Maybe a few...

The RZ350's light looks and trick frame are cool, but the weird tail section and grabrail just gotta go. They look cool in race bodywork, tho...



The Hawk GT is a classic, although the clunky rear fender and wonky high clip-ons make it awkward. Gotta appease the comfort-mongers and safetyjerks, I guess.



Bias-plies do look clumsy, although I gotta say the Avon AM22/23's look pretty good. (probably 'cuz they're on my bike)
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Old 08-09-2002, 02:35 AM   #40
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Default Re: Restoration Without the Exploration

Can I get an Amen! And so was I (still am, most would say).
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