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-   -   The Objects of Our Affection (http://www.motorcycle.com/forum/mo-reader-feedback/1313-objects-our-affection.html)

Will_Guyan 07-26-2002 05:06 PM

Re: The Objects of Our Affection
 
Glydon is The Pope of Bay Area 2 wheeled esoterica. He is the acetylene lantern lighting the way for the nihilist youth who weren't conceived until the '65 Chevy was already with rust. His articles are a joy to read, most months, and endurable on those rare off months if one has a thesaurus handy. Do yourselves a favor and check out Citybike; it's free but it's better than any of the other moto periodicals, IMO.

DaveFla 07-27-2002 09:49 AM

Re: Bash other things...
 
Why, Ashley! Don't be unkind! ;-)


DaveFla 07-27-2002 10:09 AM

Re: The Objects of Our Affection
 
I owned a '65 Impala SS convert for a short time- I bought it for $500 as parts and promptly scrapped most everything but the drivetrain. They used a lot of salt on the winter roads back then.



Certainly, my 1993 GMC pickup has some oddities that I'd not enjoy so much, were I not an engineer. But after ten years and plenty of abuse of the finish, there's less rust than I had on three year old cars during the 80's and early 90's. I don't see anyone saying that they'd rather go back to steel with coatings and finishes that one can whip up in the kitchen sink.



Mechanical timing of any sort sucks- my pulse-train generating chips will outlive at least 20,000 sets of points. I wish the GMC didn't have a cap and rotor, for instance. My 2000 Alero has the 2.4 liter Quad Four, and I enjoy the idea that it shouldn't need a thing besides some good software tweaks for the first 100,000 or so.



Finally, as for buying Glydon's pieces: he's more than good. But if it needs extra cash, then give johnnyb a raise or hire him an part-time aid, and then give me "Bitter Little Man!"


holybejesus 07-30-2002 10:16 AM

Re: The Objects of Our Affection
 
Nice article on the camera. My belief has always been the simple question "Is it rebuildable?". I have an old Nikormat. I like mechanical wris****ches as opposed to todays disposable battery operated numbers. Carbs vs Fuel injection is nice, however, that Bosch L-jetronic is as simple as fuel injection can be. I used to own that same 280z only because I couldnt afford the inspiration of that car which was the E-type. Now I have an E-type and love the fact that the car is "rebuildable" - even more so than the 280Z. Have you ever wondered how anyone could restore a modern car when after 30 years it may be collectible? Imagine trying to pull out the dashboard? Most of the parts on older cars can be made from scratch if need be. The jag is all sheet metal, leather, wood, accesible nuts and bolts, and lawn tractor technology. Harley still has that spirit. Longetivity of design and familiarity with how a product is put together will always have value and a following. As awesome as the Japanese bikes are they become dated technology and antiques the next year when they out do themselves. BMW, Ducati, Guzzi, and Harley will always have that staying power. Would you rebuild/restore a 10 year old FZR or a 10 year old K100RS BMW? In 20 years which parts will still be available? In 30 years which will seem like a classic? How about a 1995 916 vs a 1995 GSXR in 30 years?

holybejesus 07-30-2002 10:20 AM

Re: The Objects of Our Affection
 
Had an old Z - drove nice, fast, and looked good for a lemon (as far as build quality went).


KPaulCook 08-07-2002 08:01 AM

Re: The Objects of Our Affection
 
Well said. Funny is that Honda, Kawasaki, BMW, Toyota and others can use American labor and engineering and turn out world class products. American management contends they can't do it. As an MBA graduate I am highly critical of American Business Schools. Japanese managers come from the ground up. American management can have no technical or practical experience only an MBA.

redlegduke 08-10-2002 03:26 AM

Re: No Fear wrenching
 
I think, don't know, that they put the fuel pump in the tank so that the gas can cool the pump. And, it makes for pump connections that will leak safely in the tank if they should leak.



Now, I'll bet that an air-cooled pump ain't no engineering marvel. Not an engineeer, but I believe that a lot of mass-produced machine design choices has to do with ease of assembly at the factory. They have to make the thing cheaply to be able to sell it at a profit in a highly competitive market.



Anyway, my $00.02 worth.


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