Go Back   Motorcycle Forum > Motorcycle.Com General Discussion > Motorcycle News > Old News > MO Reader Feedback

Reply
 
Thread Tools
Old 07-06-2002, 04:51 AM   #21
longride
Super Duper Mod Man

 
longride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Anywhere they let me
Posts: 10,479
Default Re: Triumph heritage?

Someone who understands!
__________________
I'm a knucklehead
longride is offline   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links Remove Advertisements
Motorcycle Forum
Advertisement
Old 07-06-2002, 05:03 AM   #22
longride
Super Duper Mod Man

 
longride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Anywhere they let me
Posts: 10,479
Default Re: An open apology to Cruiser types.

The apology is a good way to go. The funny part is you don't even have to like ANY cruiser to be civil. I particularly don't like this one, but for someone else it may be their cup of tea. Plus Burnsie took too many drugs in the 70's and has a warped view anyway! If you had a point about underpowered, overdressed cruisers I would have to point at this example. I STILL would like a Triumph Bonnie streetfighter. Short fenders, solo seat, minimal everything. Think 883 Sporty with smaller fenders, lighter, and 35 more horsepower. As light as they can make it and a powerful, torquey twin. I can't bring myself to buy a Sporty but the Duke II is in sight, but not quite right. Triumph would be my answer! Otherwise it may be buy the 883, build the motor to the max, and call Stortz for the goodies.
__________________
I'm a knucklehead
longride is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2002, 08:24 AM   #23
mxgb5
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 21
Default Re: Triumph heritage?

They could then include a fake oil puddle and a bag of extra nuts and bolts with every new Bonneville!



I do wonder why Triumph spent the money trying to out-Japanese the Big Four with bikes like the TT600 and the Sprint ST when they probably should have done a bike like the Bonneville earlier.



Then again, given the sales success of the W650 in the U.S., maybe they were smarter than we think. There are still brand new 2000 model year Ws for sale at some dealers. Even here in Northern California, I have yet to see a new Bonneville on the street.



I'd like to see a sporty cafe-racer version of the stadard bonneville next... or at least some factory parts to turn it into one. I might not be a very good sample, though, since I was one of the very few who bought a Hawk GT new back in 1990 and I used to have a GB500... both very slow-selling bikes in their time.



mxgb5 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2002, 12:52 PM   #24
KPaulCook
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 2,752
Default Re: Triumph heritage?

A English friend and I got into a discussion/argument about Triumph, he had your view. He explained that Triumph is privately owned and doesn't have any stockholders to answer too. He thinks the owner/CEO of Triumph is a megalomanic who is trying to be the next Honda. I initially disagreed but came around and saw his logic. Since my friend is older than I and remembers the Triumph and Norton heydays, he has the same view as you and longride i.e. Triumph has its own heritage and style. It doesn't need to copy any one. He was disappointed in the remake Bonneville and said they should as you said go back to the drawing board. As someone who finds their three cylinder bikes intriguing I hope they don't abandon them in their quest to challenge the Japanese. The three maybe be a great comprimise of torque and high end hp.

KPaulCook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2002, 03:52 PM   #25
MrDeadeye
Founding Member
 
MrDeadeye's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 142
Default Re: Triumph heritage?

It's true that the W650 and other Japanese clones of English bikes have been slow sellers (but popular in Japan). Triumph's new Bonnevile is fat and doesn't have the right styling cues. I don't think that all the right ingredients have ever been mixed. I believe that a new Triumph that looked like a old Triumph, with a little more power, would have a shot.
MrDeadeye is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2002, 06:03 PM   #26
beryl
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 8
Default Re: Bonneville America Reader Feedback

It's out of that price range, but the BMW cruisers seem to be going their own way, as well.
beryl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2002, 06:06 PM   #27
sportbike_pilot
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 729
Default Re: Bonneville America Reader Feedback

Johnny Boy you may well turn out to be a genuine sage when it comes to elevating bikes that are a little off the beaten path (at least my beaten path anyway) into our collective consciousness.



First the Buell Firebolt. I read your review and liked what you had to say about it - but what I was actually thinking was "How good can this thing really be? It's got engine tech from the 50's for crying out loud." Then I rode the bike and absolutely loved it. Even the superlatives lavished on it by the MO staff fall short, IMHO, of describing how cool the funky and unique little Buell is in the flesh. HP numbers and tech be damned. The Firebolt rocks. I would seriously consider buying one.



Now this. The Bonnie America is a different trip but one eminently worthy of consideration by everybody. I especially like the part of your review where you spoke of not feeling like everyone is in your way on this bike. I like that vibe sometime. Well said.



I am going to try to talk my father in law into a demo ride as soon as one can be arranged. I think this bike is exactly what he's been looking for.



Cheers



sbp



sportbike_pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2002, 07:31 PM   #28
KPaulCook
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 2,752
Default Firebolt.

OK sbp,

I am going to have to find out for myself about the Firebolt. Motorcyclist magazine totally put down the bike. Marc Cook slammed the engine and Boehm slammed the "design gymnastics" that had to be used because of the engine. Carrithers criticized the handling big time. But Lord Burns loved it and Cycle World was kind to it. I am drawn to because of its great styling and unique U.S. engineering but can't see how the engine can get the job done. Ok OK I am going to ride it before I say anything more. Don't want to be accused again of being a broken record.
KPaulCook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-06-2002, 07:41 PM   #29
KPaulCook
Banned
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Posts: 2,752
Default Re: An open apology to Cruiser types.

I personally owe you an apology. I am truely sorry. About the Triumph Bonnie, I like the looks but you are right bout it being underpowered. I kkind of like the Thunderbird looks better. And the 883 basic sporty has nice clean lines especially with a solo seat and small fenders. I sat on a Duke and was itimidated by its height. Even though I am 6 ft it seemed to me to be a handful. My brother-in-law who is a dirt rider as well as a cruiser guy loved it. He said I just need some time on his dirt bikes .
KPaulCook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-07-2002, 12:20 AM   #30
sportbike_pilot
Founding Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 729
Default Re: Firebolt.

Your local HD/Buell dealer will be happy to let you demo a Firebolt as long as you show up in long pants and with a "M" endorsement on your license.



Interestingly, the dealer I went to was pretty insistent on my wearing either blue jeans or leather pants but didn't care one bit about a helmet.



I didn't think that Motorcyclist really slammed it, they just were a little tough on it opinionwise. I thought that their review was factually accurate. And I think they left plenty of room for varying opinions based on the same data.



Enjoy



sbp
sportbike_pilot is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off