Motorcycle Forum

Motorcycle Forum (http://www.motorcycle.com/forum/)
-   MO Reader Feedback (http://www.motorcycle.com/forum/mo-reader-feedback/)
-   -   Buell XB9R (http://www.motorcycle.com/forum/mo-reader-feedback/1228-buell-xb9r.html)

DurangoKid 05-17-2002 09:01 PM

Re: $10k? $8k and I am listening.
 
Cycle World compared the VFR, Falco, and Sprint RS in July 2000.



http://www.cycleworld.com/xp6/CycleW...0700_3road.xml

Agent0090 05-17-2002 10:54 PM

Re: Buell XB9R
 
It might help if Harley wasn't dead-set on Buells being sold at Harley dealers. You're asking a bunch of dealers who have never sold sportbikes to sell sportbikes. A few of them will get it right, but most won't. What's wrong with a dealer who sells Japanese or European bikes selling Buells?



This goes along with my other pipe dream question: Why can't an American motorcycle company make an in-line four cylinder engine? We Americans seem to like them, after all.

It seems that the "think out of the box" mandate stops once the bike is built.



Agent0090



P.S.- $10K seems a little steep to me, too.


xlr8r 05-18-2002 01:51 AM

Re: Buell XB9R
 
Well, we all make mistakes, and the word 'had' is the important one: in other words, it's past tense. Actually, it was a lot more reliable than a few bikes I've had since, and it was always comfortable. I learned to live with the sit-up braking, but I never came to terms with the huge hole in the midrange which was there for emissions purposes. There's a fix for that, too - it's called ditching the twin-choke boat carb ( it really does come from a boat) and fitting two Mikunis, but the next owner did that. It's still going strong, by the way, and used regularly.

fizzchem 05-18-2002 03:27 AM

Re: Buell XB9R/RC51
 
All this hyperbole and anecedotal 'evidence'. Put your money where your mouth was:



Race 'em.



I'm bound to think that the 125 Hp 72.6 lb-ft. of torque "easiest to ride fast" Twin that Don Canet ran faster 'round the track than the Mille R and the 998 will blow the proverbial doors of the Buell.



Also, recall it was Burns riding; he may have been impaired...



Consider: $400 buys you a GSXR 1000. Want to bet which is faster?



BTW, the Buell is universally thought as an "Ugly Stik" on wheels over in these parts.

spindizzy 05-18-2002 04:10 AM

Re: braking in turns
 
That's what I'd expect from some one who really doesn't know how to get the most from a bike.
Trail braking where you brake right up 'til you accelerate is the optimum form of braking - it's also the hardest to learn. If you go racing and think in terms of brake then turn you're going to get toasted. Just learn how to manage your front wheel grip and your riding will improve out of sight.

sarnali 05-18-2002 04:29 AM

Re: Buell XB9R
 
It says in the test that the buell was pulling away from an RC51, I'd say it's a pretty good comparison for a vtr, If the Buell works, that well. Buell recalling all its bikes to fix problems shows at least they stand behind their product, unlike honda who happily charged me $185 for a new voltage regulator on my VFR, it seems stator/ regulator failures have troubled honda's for 18 years that I know of, but they sure as hell aren't offering to fix them. I'm not a big fan of Buell's or Harley's for that matter but give them credit for trying, for their target market, they pretty well cover the bases. nobody is buying a buell to beat R1's.

PsychoBueller 05-18-2002 05:15 AM

Re: Buell XB9R
 
"This goes along with my other pipe dream question: Why can't an American motorcycle company make an in-line four cylinder engine? We Americans seem to like them, after all."





My question to you is: Why should an American company make an inline four cylinder engine? There are 4 Japanese and 1 British companies that make very good four cylinder engines. What purpose would be served by building the same thing that everyone else already makes? I like that my Buell has a uniquely American engine. It's different from anything else out there and I like that. The 45-degree V-Twin makes great sounds, throbs, and brutal torque. To me, and for my purposes in street riding, that is the most entertaining way to get around.


Eric 05-18-2002 05:39 AM

Re: Buell XB9R/RC51
 
Road vs. track. The fastest track motorcycle is rarely the fastest on the road. Example -- look at the Motorcyclist test of sport tourers vs. super bikes. Besides, the whole point of the Buell was that it would be a great street bike, not a great race bike.



Who cares if the Buell is "universally thought as an 'ugly stik...' in these parts?" Most people who buy Buell's like riding something a little different. And the firebolt is quite striking in person. I don't know if I would say it is beautiful in form, but to examine the bike and see the way they did things is very impressive indeed.

Hadji 05-18-2002 05:53 AM

Buell...Making you think!
 
Though they don't specify how tight and twisty the road is I am sure it's tight enough that there are no "straightaways" for the RC51 to drag race the Buell in. Minime just cannot realize, completely, just how fast this bike is on the road. He is not getting the usual clues and he is going in faster than he is used to. Look at the specs, it is a very light weight and torquey motorcycle which makes it deceptively fast. The engine is not revving it's guts out, he doesn't have to lean the bike over as much to go fast in the twisties and there is plenty of braking power. When you read about the intro in Vegas there is consistency about it's nimble, but forgiving handling on the race track, on crappy tires no less. It really sounds like Erik Buell is producing a bike that allows the rider to explore the canyons with more confidence and less drama. A really FUN motorcycle. I'll bet he could sell a boatload of these in Italy and Spain or anywhere else twisty roads encourage mature sportriding, i.e riding skills over acceleration in a straight line. This bike is definitely optimized for really tight and twisting conditions, not drag racing or highway cruising or top speed. And that is what is so subjective about MO's track tests. The bikes that are superior in acceleration will shine on tracks with longer straights, where bikes that are optimized for handling will dominate on twistier racetracks/roads.



Light weight, a broad power/torque curve, anvil tough reliability, excellent handling, great ergonomics and good looks are what makes a classic motorcycle. More power to you Eric, you are on the right track. Keep at it and you will get all of these qualities in your motorcycles and then I will buy one.



Hey Erik, how about a 60 hp, 260 lb. wet, single for some real twisty fun? Anybody interested?

polishnightmare 05-18-2002 06:14 AM

Re: Buell XB9R
 
I recently had a chance to demo ride both a firebolt and a lightning, back to back, last weekend at Buellfest in Detroit. I thought that the firebolt had a better: ride, chasis, transmition, suspension, braking, and less vibration than the lightning. However I did notice that it did seems like there was a noticably increased amount of force required to get the firebolt to change directions, as compared to the lighnting. Although in the firebolt's defense the lightning does have the dirt track handlebars on it instead of clip ons. In addition the firebolt doesn't have nearly the pep of the lightning or a 600 except way up in the RPM's. I didn't get the sense of real acceleration unless the bike was above 4,000 RPM. Even then though I think there is more in the lightning and 600's. Also it would help to have the rev limiter slightly past the 7500 RPM red line, say like 7,700 RPM. Unless your eyes are glued to the tach you run into the rev limiter everytime you really get into the throttle. I think overall that it is a decent bike, and could be a serious contener if it had a engine on pare with the current lightning or 600's and improved the turning capabilies. Then it could be a great choice for a street bike that has down low grunt for the streets and out of the back canyon turns with the top end rush of the lightning or 600.


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:43 PM.