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Old 01-09-2007, 10:07 AM   #1
acecycleins
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Default Re: Tie Down Methods for Trailering Bikes

Get a Baxley Sport chauk (sp). The device allows you to roll the front wheel into a "vice" style clamp that will hold a bike up-right without tension on the fork springs. Then find tiedown areas on your bike for stability. That's it.
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Old 01-09-2007, 10:15 AM   #2
ksquid
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Default Re: Tie Down Methods for Trailering Bikes

Interesting topic...There is a trade off.. Theoretically speaking having the bike compressed means it will take more force to move it around thus it be more secure. Since the force of spring can be simplified as F=kx where k is the spring constant and x is the distance of compression. However, all those bumps on the road get transmitted as mechanical energy thus if your bike is compressed then it can't use the suspension to transmit the energy into the suspension as oscillations of the shocks (the shock oil then heat) . The energy has to transfer somewhere so it gets transmitted to the frame.. So I can see how that might not be preferred..However, I have found that compressing the bike makes it seem more secure and less likely to move around .. I doubt if there is any real difference unless you plan on driving on really bumpy road... Where is sportbike_pilot? He could give you a better answer and would probably tell me to stick to electrical hardware and software...
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Old 01-09-2007, 10:16 AM   #3
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Default Re: Tie Down Methods for Trailering Bikes

Sounds like a better solution...good post
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Old 01-09-2007, 10:19 AM   #4
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Default Re: Tie Down Methods for Trailering Bikes

P.S. I am simplifying things by using a spring to model the forks/suspension. In reality forks as you know have different damping for compression and expansion...
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Old 01-09-2007, 10:26 AM   #5
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Default Re: Tie Down Methods for Trailering Bikes

Without having some force acting straight down on the bike other than gravity, then good luck keeping the bike upright.



My vote is that the suspension needs to be loaded slightly, otherwise everytime you go over a bump the shocks will unload and the wheels will move laterally (not good).



Don't overload the forks too much though or you'll be replacing your fork seals in the near future.
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Old 01-09-2007, 10:30 AM   #6
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Default Re: Tie Down Methods for Trailering Bikes

Sounds good...
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Old 01-09-2007, 10:31 AM   #7
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Default Re: Tie Down Methods for Trailering Bikes

This is what I've learned from professional tow operators who tow bikes:



It's good to load the suspension LIGHTLY to limit movement.



Use four straps, two front and two rear, to keep the bike from rolling fore and aft. Then use one over the top of the seat to cinch down to lightly compress the suspension



If the bike has crashbars, they make good attachment points to prevent fore-and-aft movement.
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Old 01-09-2007, 10:59 AM   #8
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Default Re: Tie Down Methods for Trailering Bikes

My only experience is towing 1 to 3 dual-sports in my 5x8 utility trailer.



#1. If it's your bike, invest in a fork saver. They're cheap and they work.

#2. I use high quality straps on the bars. They should be anchored down, out, and forward of the bike.

#3. I tightly strap the front portion of the front wheel/tire against the forward wall of the trailer.



This 'tri-strap' method ensures that the front end can't twist and move forward in the trailer causing the suspension to become lax. The fork saver ensures that you won't be frequently replacing fork seals.



You can also loosely tie down the back wheel just so it doesn't hop around. Usually I have so much stuff in my trailer that it can't move much.



I definitely agree that using a chalk is a great idea if you always trailer your bikes the same way. My issues is that I'm sometimes carrying buddies bikes so my configuration and placement is not always the same.
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Old 01-09-2007, 11:12 AM   #9
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Default Re: Tie Down Methods for Trailering Bikes

I haul bikes every weekend, and so have made hundreds of trips. Fork savers are unnecessary, but they are inexpensive so if it makes you feel better go ahead and use them. Compressing forks for a few hours at a time will NOT permanently deform the springs and does not wear out fork seals. Fork seals wear out when dirt and debris puts tears in the sealing rubber.



You don't need to get excessive with your tie-down routine, either. Whether hauling sport bikes or MX bikes, I just use two tie downs on the handle bars (or clip-ons). I've never had the rear end hop or swing around.



Compress the forks moderately. It should be pretty snug; otherwise when you hit a bump, the forks could compress further, causing the tie-downs to loosen. If your tie-down hook is clipped into a ring upside down, when it becomes loose it could fall out. Avoid this by snugging down moderately (you do not have to totally crank on it!) and putting the hook in the eye right side up. You can also use caribiner style clips on your tie-downs, or use a bungee cord to take up slack in your tie-down, for ultimate security.
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Old 01-09-2007, 12:02 PM   #10
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Default Re: Tie Down Methods for Trailering Bikes

Ace is right. I bought a Baxley SB001 three years ago. Jerome & the boys down in Dothan, AL are gifted fabricators.



I use two ties from the passenger grab handles on the ST1100 and the rear rack of the R100RT via soft tie extenders. Suspension is very lightly compressed.



Can load & unload solo. Empty weight about 450 lbs.



I did spend the extra cash on the rock guard. Tows like a dream behind the Escape or Ranger pickup. No, we have NOT hooked it to the Cooper S, thank you very much!!!



Before eyes roll too much, just where do I put SWMBO, dog, grub, etc., as we trundle to and fro from our not so palatial N GA mountain hideaway on a bi weekly basis from late March thru mid Nov? Answer? Helloooooo, Baxley!!!



I tried a tilt rail trailer. Not just no, but H EEE double sticks NOOOOO!!!!
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