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Old 01-02-2007, 06:44 PM   #51
whelan45
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Default Re: Choose Your Swiss Army Bike

If I could swap my 1981 CB750FZ for a BMW F800S, I'd be a very happy chappy. Funds don't allow, so I'll just keep riding and restoring the Honda.
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Old 01-02-2007, 08:11 PM   #52
svtech
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Default Re: Choose Your Swiss Army Bike

Great question!



None of mine qualify although the SV gets the most "just scootin' around" riding time. It's highly impractical for anything off road and it stays at home when the destination exceeds more than a couple of hundred miles.



If only I had a bigger garage ...



And more disposable income.

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Old 01-02-2007, 09:05 PM   #53
pdad13
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Default Re: Choose Your Swiss Army Bike

Well, the choice is obvious, isn't it?



The SVFR650 Concours.



Have you all forgotten?
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Old 01-02-2007, 10:15 PM   #54
Dangerousdave_2
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Default Re: Poll: Choose Your Swiss Army Bike

There's a bathroom on the right.
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Old 01-02-2007, 10:31 PM   #55
xlr8r
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Default Re: Choose Your Swiss Army Bike

I'm with your buddy on this one. I, too, sold my R1100GS and bought a R1100R. I had the GS for about six months; I've had the R for almost six years, and I can't see me selling it any time soon. I do mixed highway/backroad stuff, speeds anywhere between 40 and 90, some two-up touring, rather more solo commuting...everything, really. It gets better gas mileage than the GS, too - and it is far and away the most reliable bike I've ever had in 36+ years of riding.
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Old 01-02-2007, 10:32 PM   #56
Dangerousdave_2
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Default Re: Choose Your Swiss Army Bike

Can I just poke at the other one, a little bit? Should be a bit lighter, but 450 is fine. It's the ratio of spung to unsprung weight that determines how well your suspension works. The thing about VFRs and ST-3&4, etc, is that they absorb a bit more of the slings and arrows that the road deals out, but, because the frame is stiff, a softer ride can actually help handling. The only time a tire is of the slightest use, is when it's in contact with the ground.

A stiff suspension that works on the track doesn't cut it in the real world. That's where unsprung weight comes in. It's hard to upset the really good Sport Tourers with a bump in the road. The suspension simply absorbs it. I think that's why so many folks that use this forum, don't think entireely about how much bang you get for your buck. To us old farts, it's about a balance of traits that we can enjoy, or at least live with.

With me, that's about nipping around some of the best motorcycle roads in the world, and a few trips a year to see what the Rest of The West looks like, and hope to get to Deal's Gap someday, even if I'm riding a BMW or 1400 or something by that time. Hey, Japanese happens.
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Old 01-02-2007, 10:56 PM   #57
Dangerousdave_2
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Default Re: Choose Your Swiss Army Bike

If you think a ZX-6 is a great all-rounder, then I can't imagine why you would want a Concours or maybe ANY BMW. Look at the Suzuki 750, and the ST-3, which is cheaper to service than the 4, and will kick some pretty serious ass in the hands of an expert. Even if you are not now, you might become expert, some day, on bikes like this.

On any track you care to name, the 600's will probably eat you for lunch on anything other than literbikes, which, unfortunately, are expensive to insure, and go through tires like they were Celebrity Apologies, but if you're talking about the Real World, then these other kinds of bikes start sounding more sensnible.

But then, when did logic ever have much to do with choosing a motorcyle? I own a VFR, and would, if independently wealthy, own a couple of dozen, each for different reasons, none of them very rational.

Forced to focus on the One Bike that would meet all my needs, I gave a lot of thought to what I chose. You need to think hard about what kind of riding you actually do, rather than what kind of riding you think you do. The two things are not always the same.
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Old 01-02-2007, 11:12 PM   #58
manalagi001
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Default Re: Choose Your Swiss Army Bike

Some of my most memorable motorcycling moments have come when I was using the WRONG bike for the job, and enjoying every minute of it. Riding sloppy, muddy, deeply-rutted mountains of East Timor, or getting airborne two-up on roller-coaster hips within a Balinese caldera on a CB100. Powersliding my Monster down washboard dirt roads in El Sobrante. Using a step through for touring. Pinning an XL200 to keep up with freeway traffic-- and suffering a blown front tire in the process. Commuting with an MV Agusta. Hillclimbing with a 125 two-stroke. Etcetera.



Sometimes it's just so right to be so wrong. Enjoy the bike you have and wring it for all it is worth. Life is short. Too short.



I'm a one bike kinda guy now. I used to want a collection-- I figured about 10 bikes would do it. (Trials, MX, off-road, pitbike, track bike, commuter, tourer, cruiser, classic, etc). But even having two street bikes was one too many. Only one got ridden, while the other languished unforgivably. So now I keep one, and ride it like a child drags a one-eyed teddy bear.



Well that's not entirely true. I do have a MX bike for weekends and a pitbike for blasting around the backyard. Dang. Still, it's best to keep the bikes to a minimum.



A few years ago my commute ceased for a couple years. I ended up riding my MX bike two or three times a week and was ripping on the thing. Why? I was jonesing for moto all the time. Now that I'm back to commuting on a bike, I ride MX more like once a month, or every two weeks if I'm lucky.



Keep it simple, keep the bike quiver limited, and you'll ride your bike more, and get to know it better.
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Old 01-02-2007, 11:14 PM   #59
manalagi001
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Default Re: Choose Your Swiss Army Bike

I have a Brutale now as my only street bike and it's ripping. Not as versatile as a Monster or my previous Triumph, but do you think I'd trade back for one of the other bikes? Not on your life! And there you have it!
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Old 01-02-2007, 11:14 PM   #60
abrandt
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Default Re: Choose Your Swiss Army Bike

Any boxer will do.
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