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Old 04-27-2006, 05:17 AM   #21
seruzawa
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Default Re: Proper Break-In Technique(s)?

While I was out test riding a 2003 Honda Super Hawk without a helmet I remember thinking that Rumsfeld is doing a great job!
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Old 04-27-2006, 05:25 AM   #22
electraglider_1997
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Default Re: Proper Break-In Technique(s)?

Was that before or after the massive head injury or when you were walking into the light.
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Old 04-27-2006, 05:28 AM   #23
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Default Re: Proper Break-In Technique(s)?

I broke my Buell Ulysses in using the Motoman method and so far so good. I changed the oil after the first 70 miles as he recommends. I'm an engineer and see nothing wrong with the Motoman logic. Works for him. Who the heck can keep their bike under 3 grand rpm anyway?? Tough enough keeping the ULY under 5 grand.
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Old 04-27-2006, 05:40 AM   #24
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Default Re: Proper Break-In Technique(s)?

Well, obviously the Honda engineers are wrong and need to read the manual...
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Old 04-27-2006, 05:41 AM   #25
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Default Re: Proper Break-In Technique(s)?

So I was riding across the country helmetless on my brand new Harley (what a great deal! Only $20k!) breaking in the engine on the interstate near redline, passing all the slow moving cars with that massive v-twin torque, and engine braking from time to time, on my way to a rally against globalization..
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Old 04-27-2006, 05:45 AM   #26
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Default Re: Proper Break-In Technique(s)?

Please dont judge all engineers' thought processes by KPAUL.
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Old 04-27-2006, 05:51 AM   #27
seruzawa
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Default Re: Proper Break-In Technique(s)?

Dude. It could always be worse. We could have someone like Johnson or Carter!
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Old 04-27-2006, 05:54 AM   #28
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Default Re: Proper Break-In Technique(s)?

Most automotive engineers would agree that the "book" break in is not optimum for all machines. There are as many techniques as there are experts ,but most fall somewhere between the factory recommendation and the Motottune method. Are you the type that would never change the jetting of your carb since the factory knows best (ignoring the fact that the factory setting is a compromise to meet epa and provide performance in all temps/altitudes,etc) ? Dont be a lemming....read, explore,research and draw your own conclusions;but dont blindly do whatever the factory says.
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Old 04-27-2006, 05:59 AM   #29
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Default Re: Proper Break-In Technique(s)?

Minton also said that it doesn't matter how hard you run the engine the rings are going to seat sooner or later.
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Old 04-27-2006, 06:12 AM   #30
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Default Re: Proper Break-In Technique(s)?

It doesn't seem to bother anyone here that, so far, there has been no explanation supporting either claim for breakin - hot and fast or easy and slow.



Where's all the engineers on this site who can explain in detail why the break-in should be hot and fast??



The piston travels the same path.

If I file a piece of metal it makes no difference whether I do it hard and fast or easy and slow - the mate between the two metals will be the same. Fast and hard gets me there quicker that's all. (As I get older - easy and slow feels better, except towards the big finish).



It is not good to run an engine hard before it heats up to operating temperature. Although it is much worse for old air-cooled engines because the piston-cylinder gaps tend to be much larger (~0.004"). My Harley runs piston-cylinder gaps of about 0.0015" and I'm sure my Hinckley Triumph is something like that or less. But, once the two metal surfaces bed in by removing microscopic amounts of metal that's it. Since they travel the precise same path it's just a matter of how fast the whole process takes place not how well.
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