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Old 10-11-2005, 07:27 AM   #41
conchscooter
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Default Re: The upside of high gas prices?

my 1997 Geo Metro 4cyl 1300cc auto gets 43mpg with a/c running. My 2002 Suzuki 650 gets 50 mpg roughly. My commute takes 45 mins in the staid Geo, 35 mins on the Suzuki Savage on the highway. The Geo cost $2500 the Suzuki $3100. If i were looking for economy I'd take the all-weather car- looking for fun and my lost youth I own both and save the Geo for my wife (and for myself when rain is pouring down). She works days I work nights so the Geo can do double duty. My biggest hassle with the Suzuki is the 2.5 gallon tank requiring a fillup every other trip into Key West, 25 miles away. When South Florida panicked after Katrina and gas lines reappeared I took to buying gas 30 gallons at a time in jugs and I store them in my shed. I waste less commute time filling the tiny tank at home and have gas in reserve for the next (inevitable) panic.
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Old 10-11-2005, 08:16 AM   #42
cfc
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Default MPG

Might be another selling feature for Harley / Buell. The most mpg / cc.



Both my Roadking and Buell both get around 50mpg



My wifes 2000 Golf TDI gets around the same as well.
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Old 10-11-2005, 08:36 AM   #43
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Default Re: The upside of high gas prices?

The simple answer is that the horsepower per displacement is a lot less.



The longer answer is that a short stroke, high rpm motor runs faster at the same speed (mph). It pumps more air, generates more power and consumes more fuel in doing so. My 1970 Triumph 650 (bore to stroke ratio of about 0. gets the same torque and power at the same rpm as my 2002 600 Speed 4, which has a bore to stroke ratio of about 1.3. But, whereas the 650 isn't much fun to ride above 4000rpm (~65mph, 25HP), nothing much is happening at that rpm on my Speed 4 (~45mph). The Speed 4 revs to 14,000rpm. At 65mph the Speed 4 is spinning about 6,000 rpm and also generating half again as much torque and horsepower (~40HP). But, I'm getting 40mpg with the Speed 4 instead of 55mpg on the old 650.



The other advantage of new technology is that the short stroke motor runs with an average piston speed much less than the long stroke motor, so it can rev higher to generate that much more torque and power. Valves and springs are much improved and last longer even at the higher speeds.



The reason Harley's seem to have so much torque has mostly to do with the cadence of the motor. It feels like a single cycle of the motor is pulling you forward. But, actually a smaller displacement short stroke engine is generating a lot more torque for the same speed (mph), but it's at higher rpm so it doesn't feel the same. Although, it is a characteristic of long stroke motors to make their highest torque at the lower end of the rev range.

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Old 10-11-2005, 10:34 AM   #44
davidhaner
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Default Re: The upside of high gas prices?



My SV650S never gets worse than 55 MPG and I ride it hard; I could probably baby it to 65.



Most sportbikes I see are 750cc's or less. They do get good mileage; better than all but absolutely the best hybrids.



When are the hybrid bikes going to hit the market?
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Old 10-11-2005, 10:48 AM   #45
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Default Re: The upside of high gas prices?

More of the problems with those small cars are regulation and the same thing with diesels. They can't pass a lot of the particulate pollution requirements. Also, like you stated, Americans aren't going to buy smaller until they absolutely have too. And diesels have a bad image in the US. Mid-sized still sell 2.2 million cars; mostly camry, accord, impala. If it were as easy as shipping them over you would see a private firm here doing it. But the regulations prevent it.
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Old 10-11-2005, 11:07 AM   #46
sarnali
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Default Re: The upside of high gas prices?

'course not, It's a user fee.
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Old 10-11-2005, 03:22 PM   #47
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Default Re: The upside of high gas prices?

The longer stroked, lower revving engines like the Harley have heavy crankshaft flywheels spinning around, and this contributes to their stump pulling torque and better fuel consumption. That sort of low down grunt is just not available with the short stroke, high revving, lightweight engines. The constant gear changing to keep the motor in the power band tends to make them thirstier.
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Old 10-11-2005, 04:17 PM   #48
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Default Re: The upside of high gas prices?

My 2000 X1 gets 45 to 55mpg depending on how hard I'm thrashing on it. It's actually pretty reliable and cheap to maintain. The tire bill is a little spendy though. I've been through two and a half sets in 9000 miles.
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Old 10-11-2005, 06:17 PM   #49
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Default Re: The upside of high gas prices?

Well, AZ Vehicle Licence Tax is based solely on the "Assessed Value". The VLT is 60% of the MSRP of the vehicle, then reduced 16.25% for every passing year. The number you get there is the assessed value, and for every $100 you pay $2.89 ($2.80 for the first year).



The first year a $25,000 car is sold it's assessed value is $15,000, and the registration fee would be $420.00. The next year the assessed value is $12,562.50 and the fee would be $363.06.



So as you see the registration fees here in Arizona are not based on Displacement or Gross Weight (though weight is a factor in registering a commercial vehicle), but by the actual assessed value of the vehicle. It kinda pays to drive a '85 Mazda RX-7 I guess



I know, how the hell do I know this. I don't even work for the AZ MVD. Trivial information is my hobby!
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Old 10-12-2005, 04:10 AM   #50
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Default Re: The upside of high gas prices?

I think what I'm seeing is folks who really can't stand the gas prices buying $500-$2000 bikes and trying to stretch their gas mileage. Granted the newer bikes with more than like 80 hp that we bought for performance are going to eat tire and insurance money but the lower power bikes can get decent mileage out of a set, older and smaller can be cheaply insured and very very few cars can match 40 to 50mpg that most bikes can do when ridden at legal speeds.
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