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Old 12-13-2004, 06:38 PM   #11
gceaves
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Default Re: Untrained Riders account for overwhelming majority of fatalities.

Been riding daily for almost two years: to and from work, multiple-day trips with luggage, touring with my girlfriend, ferry trips to other countries, etc. I ride in snow, rain, fog and below freezing temperatures, as well as in the more pleasant spring, summer and fall.



Bought my second motorcycle in April 2003. It's a Hyosung GV250 (sold as some sort of "Alpha cruiser" in the States). It has about 23 horse power. That's MORE than enough for any human need.



Never taken an MSF course. Plan to, though, if I ever move back to North America.



First step I took was to read David Hough's "Proficient Motorcycling". I re-read the book monthly. I keep it in the bathroom for easy access. I take it with me on road trips. I followed his advice. I practice emergency stops in large parking lots on weekends. I also practice figure-8 maneuvers. Practice helps a lot.



Second step was to always wear a bright orange reflective vest. I look like a dork, but that's normal for me. Frontal visibility is key, and the reflective vest has saved me on occasion; It helps to be seen. I recommend a reflective vest to everybody. I ride for convenience, economics and fun, and a reflective vest helps in all those regards.



Third was to try to always wear a bulky protective Kevlar armor jacket. Uncomfortable and hot as hell in the summer, but makes me feel safe. Otherwise, denim jacket. Never filter between mirrors without armor.



Fourth is to only rarely ride drunk, and then, only when BARELY inebriated.



Following these simple rules, I have yet to have a serious motorcycle crash.





-gceaves



Hyosung GV250

Seoul, Korea
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Old 12-13-2004, 08:24 PM   #12
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Default Re: Untrained Riders account for overwhelming majority of fatalities.

Is this really a surprise to anyone? MSF courses should be mandatory, and I am a big fan of tiered licensing. Why on earth are people allowed to register a motorcycle without a motorcycle license?



In a perfect world, we would require a year of dirt riding before allowing anyone on the street. It doesn't help with traffic awareness and other street skills, but it does tell the rider where his limitations are, and also the limitations of the machine. It also teaches basic handling techniques like countersteering and clutch/throttle control.



To answer your question, I have taken the two courses offered in VA, basic and advanced, and I was an instructor in the Army's motorcycle training program before it was integrated with the MSF and formalized.



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Old 12-14-2004, 12:29 AM   #14
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Default Re: The hidden story

[b] and wear your gear [b]
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Old 12-14-2004, 12:33 AM   #15
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Default Is the 2005 GSX-R600 a good beginner's bike?

I have about almost a year of experience.

Is the GSX-R600 a good beginner bike?

Also if it is low on power, should I try the GSX-R1000?
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Old 12-14-2004, 02:17 AM   #16
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Default Re: Is the 2005 GSX-R600 a good beginner's bike?

I think with either bike you should look into some kind of turbo or nitrous mod. Beginners need to go as fast as possible.
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Old 12-14-2004, 02:28 AM   #17
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Default Re: Untrained Riders account for overwhelming majority of fatalities.

Don't forget all the young studs buying that spiffy, new GSX-R1000, just because it's what all their friends tell them is the fastest. I just bought a brand new GSX-R600 a month ago, after riding a Bandit 600 for two years, and if it weren't for the time on the Bandit, I'm pretty sure I would have wrecked the new bike very quickly. It may have awesome handling, brakes, and power, but if you don't know how to handle the awesome handling, brakes and power, you're no better off than an old guy buying a big Harley.



Just my thoughts.



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Old 12-14-2004, 02:29 AM   #18
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Default Re: Untrained Riders account for overwhelming majority of fatalities.

Oh, and I took the MSF class before I bought the Bandit, and then took the advanced class the next year.



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Old 12-14-2004, 02:40 AM   #19
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Default Re: Is the 2005 GSX-R600 a good beginner's bike?

As long as that "about almost a year of experience" has been riding in mommy's big, gargantuan, lumbering, 3-ton turd of an SUV, you should be fine with the GSX-R1000.



In all seriousness, the GSX-R600 is the first bike that I've ever wheelied without clutching it up. Granted, I had to let the power pull my own weight back, which in turn pulled on the bars, right where the torque curve really starts pointing up; and it was only a little one, but it still woke me up pretty well.



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Old 12-14-2004, 03:12 AM   #20
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Default Re: The hidden story

No, NH does not require helmets. Funny thing is that stupid mentality permeates certain riders' complete lifestyle. I'm one of those dorks that has specific helmets for street riding, dirt-biking, skiing, karate, hockey, street-hockey, bicycling, and even roller-blading.



Last year while skiing (with a friend that also happens to own 2 harleys) he took a pretty good fall and cut his head open. When I suggested that he wear a helmet he said "I don't wear one on my bike, how can I wear one skiing." I tried to confuse him with the facts, and of course none of his harley buddies ski, but the peer pressure to comply with the image of the modern rugged idividualist iron cowboy is too strong.





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