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Old 11-08-2004, 10:42 AM   #11
nbyers
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Default Frame Sliders

I've got Intuitive frame sliders on the R1. They mount on the engine mount bolts on each side and on the swingarm bolt on the right side.



No drilling necessary, but that's a product (I'm sure unintentional) of the R1's fairing design. Many many sport bikes need their fairings drilled so the slider can poke through.



Big question is....why the @#$% don't manufacturers just build frame sliders into the design of their bikes? How obvious is this?



Possibility number one: Manufacturing cost. The sliders from Intuitive cost $30 for the tops (both sides) and $60 for the right side low. We're talking about three pieces of nylon and three bolts....most of the cost is marketing and packaging. Could the big four do it for $10 a bike? You bet they could. So they don't do it because it costs too much.



Possibility number two: Owners of bikes with frame sliders buy fewer $300 plastic fairings after tipovers, and this is a major profit center for bike manufacturers. I'm cynical enough (and I KNOW mile_eater is cynical enough) to believe this.



However, the cost of replacing plastic on bikes contributes markedly to their insurance costs. This isn't just for sportbikes. Check out the FJR1300 and imagine a tipover on one of those. That not be cheap. Little low-speed tipover results in $1100 worth of plastic replacement; add a mark on the frame and the bike is totaled. AND the cost of insurance is a major consideration when considering buying a plastic-faired bike. Thus, in the long run bike manufacturers would be smart to build tipover protection into fairings. Fewer expensive plastic fairing parts sold, but more bikes.



There are/were a few bikes with fairing protection built in (Honda ST1100/1300, for example; the Tuono comes with crash bungs). The best of these in my mind is the CBR1000F. You can't even tell where the frame sliders are because they're integrated so well, but a tipover costs about $50.
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Old 11-08-2004, 10:49 AM   #12
chingbaby
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Default Re: Motorvation Frame Sliders for Honda VTR1000F

Dude, those look awesome! I'm gonna call!
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Old 11-08-2004, 11:14 AM   #13
sarnali
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Default Re: Motorvation Frame Sliders for Honda VTR1000F

Frame sliders make your bike go alot faster, just like using race compound tires on the street makes you faster., Don't forget the carbon fiber bits too, you'll cut a few dozen grams with those alone.
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Old 11-08-2004, 12:22 PM   #15
wrecks
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Default Re: Motorvation Frame Sliders for Honda VTR1000F

I'm still searching for a good set of sliders for my 1000RR. It made it through its first season without a drop but I'm paranoid as hell. The engine mount bolts on the 1000 don't line up with the vents in the fairing and I'm really hesitant to cut gaping holes in it. BUt then again, if it goes down it's 50 dollars instead of 300. There are some no-cut sliders available in australia (raven racing) but I can't find a dealer here that will offer them. THey use a crossbar cantilevered from the engine mounts for support.



Can anyone recommend a good slider for the 1000RR?
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Old 11-08-2004, 01:33 PM   #17
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Default Re: However....

Brittle steel on the Titanic was covered extensively on a History Channel show a few years ago. Yard workers had saved a few rivits and bits of iron as keepsakes and these were passed down as heirlooms.

When tested and subjected to extremely cold salt water they became brittle and shattered like glass. The conclusion was that the metalurgy was wrong, and when the ship bounced along the side of the burg the rivit heads instead of deforming merely popped off, allowing the seams to open and sink the ship. That's why no "30 ft gash" was found

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Old 11-08-2004, 01:55 PM   #18
chingbaby
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Default Re: However....

Good point about compromises and engineering. However, I think which ever bolt is decided to be better, hardened or soft, the same type should be used for both sides, not hard on the left, soft on the right.



More importantly, I don't think either type of bolt should have to have 6.5mm less threading to take up the load.
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Old 11-08-2004, 02:08 PM   #19
fernandopan
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Default Hey, please study a bit more.

The number on the bolt refers to its strength. This "hardness = brittleness logic" of yours can't be applied on this case. Besides, breaking can never be a benefit on a bolt life.

There is other important point here: any manufacturer should advise the buyer that he might have to drill a hole in something, even if it's obvious. And any manufacturer should provide an instruction manual, it is a costumer right.

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Old 11-08-2004, 03:16 PM   #20
SuperBill
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Default Re: Motorvation Frame Sliders for Honda VTR1000F

ThereÂ’s a British outfit on eBay that markets some VTR 1000 "fairing protectors" that intrigue me.



http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...3126 679&rd=1



It looks like these protectors simply replace four mushroom-head hex screws that attach the fairing to the frame (two on each side). Should take about 2 minutes to install.



From the photograph it looks like the lower one would hit exactly where I picked up some fairing rash during a low speed spill. Unfortunately, that spill also rashed my engine case and a bar end weight, neither of which would be protected by these devices.



Since the fairing screws are only 4 or 5 mm, these things clearly wonÂ’t help much during a crash at speed. Nevertheless, they look like they might be effective during one of those annoying 0 MPH tip-overs. I think IÂ’ll get a set for the old Superhawk and see what happens.

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