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Old 02-25-2003, 12:07 PM   #51
vfrroom
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Default Re: Motorcycle industry fixation.

I agree, Ducati's move with the 999 will carry over into other bikes as well. How far do you take adjustability though before incurring additional costs on the bike. What are the customers willing to pay for adjustability and special ergos? I think these are all considered when new ideas are brought to the table when developing a bike.



The aftermarket products will fill this gap as pointed out. If that doesn't fit the bill, go buy the VFR, it will do everything.



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Old 02-25-2003, 12:08 PM   #52
SuperBill
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Default Re: Motorcycle industry fixation.

Whaddya' want? Heated grips, cruise control, ABS? You got it. Tubeless radial tires that stick like glue and wear like iron? You got it! Big windshield & fairing? You got it! A bike that will go 160 MPH off of the showroom floor for less than the cost of a Hyundai? You got it! Dual-sport, naked, super-sport, cruiser, standard scooter, pseudo-sport, UJM? You got it!



Good God, Runner00, did you just start riding yesterday? Take a look at the limited selection of crap we used to ride (and love) and youÂ’ll see that the industry has come light years over the past few decades. We are living in the Golden Age of Motorcycling - you can get whatever you want new, or take advantage of our near infinite after-market to personalize a bike to your taste. And you can do it on the cheap!



By the way, if you want climate control you can always buy an Aerostitch (or a Buick, for that matter).

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Old 02-25-2003, 12:22 PM   #53
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Default We need cupholders!

Oh yeh, I'll buy the first bike that comes with the useful things that car makers have embraced like cupholders, sunglass holders, outside air thermometers, electric seats, intermittant windscreen wipers, demisters, self dimming electric mirrors, key-in-ignition chimes, etc, etc.



Get real guys, what do you seriously want that you can't already get on a motorcycle. runner00 mentioned cruise control (which is available on tourers) but I'm sure for most riders it would be an expensive, rarely used gimmick. You (runner00) said you could go on and on. Please do...what else can we possibly be missing out on?



Personally I'd like my car maker to spend money to make it perform better and consume less gas than have a silly wing mirror that automatically dips when I put the gearbox in reverse. This is even more relevant for a bike.



There is some truth in your point about the extreme focus of sportbikes, but please let's not have the bike makers concentrating on gimmicky crap we don't need as the car makers love to do. Personally bikes such as the BMW, Ducati and Yamaha FJR1300 sport-tourers have all the creature comforts I'd ever want. The Goldwing-ish tourers are already far beyond sensible luxury IMO but I guess for some, luxury is of primary importance over function.
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Old 02-25-2003, 12:26 PM   #54
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Default Re: Motorcycle industry fixation.

Not only does the sportbiker market turn over on a regular basis, so do the riders themselves. Just a guess here, but I'll bet the manufacturers make a helluva lot more on replacement plastic and parts for sportbikes than any other type of motorcycle. Could be that the margin on these replacement parts boosts sportbike profitability beyond what their base sales would dictate.
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Old 02-25-2003, 12:42 PM   #55
dardas
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Default Re: Motorcycle industry fixation.

Wouldn't it be more functional to leave the climate control issue up to the suit/clothing/helmet manufacturers? Just a thought. 'twould seem futile to engineer it into the bike.



Also, I'd like to nominate runner00 for wanker cage comment of the year



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Old 02-25-2003, 12:46 PM   #56
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Default Re: Motorcycle industry fixation.

Tumbler: How many times have you seen race replica riders sitting at traffic lights shaking life back into their wrists? Long highway rides are the worst for the right hand.



Jfiore: Dunno where you live but when I rented a Subaru for a week with cruise control and drove all over upstate New York and Eastern Canada I used it all the time. Hell, I even used it a lot in the Boston area. Set it up and you can use the cruise lever as a throttle. Pretty relaxing on the right leg.
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Old 02-25-2003, 01:25 PM   #57
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Default Re: Motorcycle industry fixation.

Here's the question- Why don't more bikes have accessory plugs? Heated grips? Why does asking for some creature comforts make you a wuss? I know, someone is going to respond about how he rode the iron butt on a ducati 916 and he was fine so you should be too, but for the rest of us, wouldn't it be nice to have a little of both? All day comfort, excellent handling, good looks... and please don't respond with a list of bikes that currently do all that. My question is why don't ALL bikes do that? Is it too much to ask that my fingers don't go numb?



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Old 02-25-2003, 01:28 PM   #58
ridinsince59
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Default Re: Motorcycle industry fixation.

"For example, a recent magazine review criticized the new Yamaha R1 for being "too liveable", as though that's a flaw.

Most motorcyclists, unlike most motorcycle journalists, aren't so jaded that unpredictable wheelies becomes a cherished feature."



Man, you hit the nail square-in-the-head with that one, Betamax!



I've noticed the same thing myself, in the 3 riding mags I get every month. Far too often, a bike's "day-to day" usefulness is close to the last thing on the "moto-jounalist's" list of priorites! Practicality has definitely taken a backseat, when it comes to what might and might not, be important for many potential buyers!

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Old 02-25-2003, 01:43 PM   #59
Mikey
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Default Re: Motorcycle industry fixation.

Those of us who are "serious" about riding recognize that dealing with the differing climate is just one of those things you do, like putting your feet down when you stop at a light. I don't know if you are serious with this "fair weather biker" bull***** or just playing devils advocate. Personally, I am tired of it and have only seen two of your replies.



Dealing with what Mother Nature lays out for you is one of the things that makes motorcycling great. You aren't moving through the world, you are a part of it. My suggestion to you is that if you can't handle being a little cold, a little wet, or a little hot sometimes is to trade in whatever two-wheeled vehicle you have and buy a car, buy a BMW C1 and pretend to be riding a regular motorcycle, or quit your BS "I am a better biker than you are parade".
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Old 02-25-2003, 01:51 PM   #60
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Default Re: Motorcycle industry fixation.

I think you are referring to a 1984 GL1200 Goldwing. They are readily available in the used bike market.
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