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Old 11-04-2002, 09:05 PM   #11
KPaulCook
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Default Re: Death of the V-Twin in Road Racing

I think everyone knows Road Racing means track racing in this context, go look at the AMA site for reference.
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Old 11-04-2002, 11:53 PM   #12
MrDeadeye
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Default Re: Death of the V-Twin in Road Racing

Now MO is posting flame bait by Kpaul with a link to a MotorcycleDaily article--This is news? Why don't you throw some of our subscription money to Dirck Edge and just post his stuff directly? He seems able to come up with daily bike news that is NOT garbage.
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Old 11-05-2002, 02:55 AM   #13
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Default Re: Death of the V-Twin in Road Racing

Damn. Do a bit more research.



As has always been the case, they are developing engines with both firing orders. They are a long way off deciding which one will be campaigned this year. At the Valencia round displaying the bikes they had Bayliss on the doubled up firing bike and Guareschi (sp) on the conventional one.
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Old 11-05-2002, 02:56 AM   #14
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Default Re: Death of the V-Twin in Road Racing

I thought it said something about reliability issues, not power.
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Old 11-05-2002, 03:09 AM   #15
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Default Re: Quote from a linked article

It is the regulations that define the ideal solutions for each category: they do not define what the overall best engine is, but the best engine in view of the limitations imposed.



When Formula 1 regulations changed to allow turbos, normally-aspirated engines disappeared. This does not mean that the best engine around was a turbo, simply that it was for those particular regulations.




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Old 11-05-2002, 03:53 AM   #16
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Default Re: Why WSB doesn't matter any more

I guess your Japanese superiority theory went down the tubes. As far as I can tell the rules are the same for every mfg. that races in WSB. Does Ducati have special rules just for them? If they do, name it. Name one rule that has "Ducati" in it for any special favors. If they don't have a special mfg. rule, then the Japanese should easily bring a superior product to any racing application, since you say they are always superior in every way. Since they can't spend 10 million to 1 million to achieve this, they quit like little babies. Ducati, a nickel and dime company, has handed them their collective azzes for many years running, and since experience and dedication to design are the prime factors for winning, and throwing money at the bikes doesn't guarantee a victory, it's no wonder they quit. Honda did the same in flattrack racing when they couldn't spend a boatload to assure victory, and the others don't want to play there. Honda couldn't make a superior motocross bike, so they bought Ricky Carmichael. And so it goes. See, the ones that hate a level playing field are the Japanese. Honda wants a spend fest for every racing catagory. They have the most money by far and are willing to spend it. Outspend the competition tenfold and buy all the best riders, then they can achieve another great Honda victory. Look at the joke MotoGP is. Honda cleaned up, and will continue to clean up, as they have for many years there. Logic dictates that without restraints, if I spend more, I win more. All racing has rules. The rules are more than fair. It's the fairness of those rules that irks your superior Japanese makers.
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Old 11-05-2002, 04:07 AM   #17
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Default Re: Death of the V-Twin in Road Racing

The firing order will remain the same, Ducati will most likely still try to fire two cylinders at once..... pay attention to what Honda did with the RCV, it is a v5 but the firing order is the same as a 2 cylinder....
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Old 11-05-2002, 05:17 AM   #18
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Default Re: Death of the V-Twin in Road Racing

I take a day off and this is what happens... my apologies, MO.
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Old 11-05-2002, 05:22 AM   #19
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Default Re: Death of the V-Twin in Road Racing

How can you say Death to V-Twins when the bike wasn't even a twin to start with? It was a 4 cylinder bike and is still a 4 cylinder bike
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Old 11-05-2002, 05:23 AM   #20
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Default Re: Death of the V-Twin in Road Racing

Racing has always contained an element of stacking rules to favor one particular manufacturer or engine configuration to the detriment of others. One of the earliest examples of this was many moons ago when the gasoline engine racers got the racing authorities to ban the Stanley Steamers because of a couple of spectacular boiler explosions.... never mind the many more instances of gasoline engined race cars burning their drivers to death. The point was that the Steamers where kicking the gas car's collective butt.



If you'd been around racing any length of time you'd have learned that manufacturers pressure the racing authorities frequently to get rules changed... and then drop out completely and go home with their toys when they don't get their way.



Why aren't you complaining about the fact that some MX races now allow 250cc 4-Strokes to race with 125cc two strokes? There's an example of cooking rules to favor an inferior powerplant. There may be other reasons to do such a thing, but it is still a rule change to give an advantage to a particular group over another.



Often these rule changes are made to simply allow more people to compete on somewhat equal terms. This is a laudable goal. But it is still an arbitrary set of rules.



Wait until you have maybe two whole years riding experience until you pretend to have an opinion on anything motorcycle. You've already proven your inability to come up with a coherent one.
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