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Old 08-27-2008, 10:51 AM   #1
newone08
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Default Newbie with sportbike

Hi,
I am new to this forum and new to riding motorcycles at the age of 27. I just completed the MSF course in July, and I bought a 2001 R6. Unfortunately, I didn’t find this site until afterwards. I read some of the posting for newbies, and hate I didn’t read it before I bought a sportbike for my first bike. So far I have been riding locally to work (2miles from home) and around my subdivision. I also practice in an empty lot around the corner, but I still am a little nervous at times when riding because I respect the power of the bike. I have friends who have sportbikes, but I am not ready to get out with them and ride. I was wondering if anyone had some advice for me, seeing the fact that I bought a SS for a first bike. I don’t want to get rid of it, but at the same time I don’t want to be super nervous when riding. I have had a few close calls, but thankfully my MSF training helped out. Any advice would help
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Old 08-27-2008, 11:08 AM   #2
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Default Well, Newbie

You've pick one fvcking tough learning curve. Here's the deal: Since you've jumped right in head first the best you can do is hope your head doesn't hit the bottom of the pool. SO- track days are your friend. A "real" rider's school is recommended. Star Riding School, Keith Code's school, Kevin Schwantz Suzuki School- find one in your area and pay the $2000 to be trained by sportbike professionals. There are pro racers all over this country that have rider's schools. Can't find one you like then go to your local bike shop and ask the guys at the parts counter if there are any recommended schools. Don't ride with jacka$$es! If you're in a crowd of "stunta's" find a new crowd. Ask questions to the "old guys" riding Ducatis and Aprilias. These guys are usually in their 40s or 50s and have a lifetime of experience. Good luck.
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Old 08-27-2008, 11:11 AM   #3
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First off, for a new rider to admit he is nervous at riding an R6 as his first bike is a good thing. Keep doing what you are doing. Don't move to the next level until you feel completely comfortable at you current level.

A good practice is to get up very early on Sunday morning, like at dawn, and put in more practice. The roads are pretty empty at that time what with all the hangovers.
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Old 08-27-2008, 12:04 PM   #4
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Can you afford a beater bike (250cc range)? It may cost less than the hospital and repair bills.
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Old 08-27-2008, 12:26 PM   #5
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well I thought about selling it and then turning around and buying a 250 Ninja or Suzuki 500, but I don't want to get something and become bored with it rather quickly.
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Old 08-27-2008, 12:37 PM   #6
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$2000 is pricey for a riding school right now. What about the Advanced Riders Class given through MSF?
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Old 08-27-2008, 01:23 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newone08 View Post
$2000 is pricey for a riding school right now. What about the Advanced Riders Class given through MSF?
That would be good. If you can keep from twisting the loud handle hard for a few months you should be okay. Your willingness to seek advice shows you have self-discipline. If there are less well traveled rural roads nearby those are excellent places to get used to the bike itself.

Remember you are learning two skills. One is the physical handling of the bike itself. The other is learning to deal with roads and traffic. These factors are quite different than driving a car. On a bike you are invisible.
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Old 08-27-2008, 01:26 PM   #8
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Buy a couple of books.

Lee Parks - Total Control (Lee Parks Design, World's Finest Deerskin Motorcycle Gloves and Accessories)

David Hough - Proficient Motorcycling Amazon.com:

Practice your emergency maneuvers. Panic braking, especially. Most Sportbikes don't respond well to stomping on the rear brake pedal.

Practice "What if's?" when on the road. What if that car does such-and-such? How do I get away?

Experience will take you a long way. Be Careful!
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Old 08-27-2008, 02:19 PM   #9
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Kirk made an excellent point, let me restate it: avoid riding with "the other guys" for now. There is no better way to get wrapped around a telephone pole than trying to keep up with guys who are riding at or above their limits. When I was riding sportbikes, I never rode faster than I did with other like bikes: you just can't help it. I don't know if it's a guy thing, a bike thing, or a pack mentality, but it's real.
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Old 08-27-2008, 02:34 PM   #10
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I currently own "The Idiots Guide to Motorcycles" and practicly read it everyday, but I will grab David Hough's book as well. My class instructor recommended it also.

I appreciate everyones advice, and ease you've shown even though I bought a supersport for my first bike. I want to do all I can to make sure I don't become a SQUID.
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