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-   -   Numb hands while riding? (http://www.motorcycle.com/forum/learning-ride/7789-numb-hands-while-riding.html)

Buzglyd 04-15-2008 02:01 PM

It could just be the position of the bars is wrong for you. When I first got my Ducati ST4, my hands would go numb in 15 minutes with lots of tingling. The bars were hitting me right in my Ulnar (?) nerve.

I added some risers which changed the position and it never bothered me after that.

longride 04-15-2008 02:03 PM

Try loosening your grip on the bars. Posibly adjust the handlebars to a lower position. I like my hand position below my elbows when I ride, or my hands get numb also. Could be vibration, but I doubt it. That kind of numb feels different than your own body doing it.

Buzglyd 04-15-2008 02:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by longride (Post 182533)
Try loosening your grip on the bars. Posibly adjust the handlebars to a lower position. I like my hand position below my elbows when I ride, or my hands get numb also. Could be vibration, but I doubt it. That kind of numb feels different than your own body doing it.

You forgot to ask him if he pulled the grips off.

Kenneth_Moore 04-15-2008 02:21 PM

The only real solution is to trade your bike in on a 1970's two stroke, preferably a Yamaha. Now, if only you could locate one...

longride 04-15-2008 02:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Buzglyd (Post 182535)
You forgot to ask him if he pulled the grips off.

I still have the finger indentations on my grips from your last visit!

bbtowns 04-15-2008 03:15 PM

I'm going to guess it's vibration, and hopefully not any medical problem. All bikes transmit different frequencies through the bars in greater and lesser amount. Usually a high frequency buzz is harder to tolerate than a low frequency, but I'm guessing it varies more than that and by individual as well. You'd think a twin would have a low frequency buzz? Try some gloves with gel palms, that has helped my hands with long distance riding. Like someone said previously, heavier bar end weights would help, as would a bar snake and perhaps a foam grip wrap.

redsavina 04-15-2008 03:45 PM

Wow, what great responses to my post. Thanks for the ideas and support. I think I am going to try to determine if its riding posture or vibration. If I sit on the bike for 10 or 15 minutes in the typical riding posture and see what happens. If they go numb, then its riding posture and not vibration.

I do remember that during the MSF riding course, I rode a 2006 Honda 250. Spent 4 hours on it the first day which was pretty cold actually, and 5 hours on it the following Saturday. We only rode for 10 – 15 minutes at a time, and never went over 30mph, but I never felt my hands go numb at all during the course.

I also rode my brothers bike for about 15 minutes last Saturday, it’s a 2003 Suzuki C50 with 20,000 miles on it. It has a different set of bars, that sweep out more, and come further back. Now that I think of it, no numbness there either.

pushrod 04-15-2008 04:01 PM

RS,

Your relief may be as simple as rotating the handlebars a bit in one direction.

Biggest cause of your symptoms is what was mentioned above - a death grip. Try to relax, starting with your shoulders, then the elbows. If you are tense there, you will be everywhere.

Also, try holding the grips with your "pointer" finger extended over the clutch/brake lever.

Good luck!

pushrod 04-15-2008 04:07 PM

RS, concerning the T/C,

Have you tried shooting it while holding it like a rifle? I have the original Contender in .30-30/14", and that hold (when there is no tree or other suitable rest around) is much easier. Both for steadiness and soaking up the recoil.

Especially when you add the weight of a scope.

redsavina 04-15-2008 04:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pushrod (Post 182559)
RS, concerning the T/C,

Have you tried shooting it while holding it like a rifle? I have the original Contender in .30-30/14", and that hold (when there is no tree or other suitable rest around) is much easier. Both for steadiness and soaking up the recoil.

Especially when you add the weight of a scope.

Holding the gun like a rifle can separate the forearm attachment from the barrel. I have seen it happen with a friends gun. Its just two screws, and the forearm is plastic/rubber. My father in law, the 2nd guy shooting the gun in my youtube video, has a older T/C in 7-30 waters, which is a 30-30 necked down to a 7mm bullet. He will shoot that gun 1 handed, which is pretty insane considering the recoil on that thing. However, after shooting the 460 S&W Mag, the 7-30 waters T/C feels like you are shooting a 9mm.


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