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Old 07-28-2009, 09:35 PM   #331
DanMgy
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Default How about the Yamaha FZ 6 to start with?

So I have read through most all the posts and see a lot of recommendations, but none around the Yamaha FZ-6, NOT the FZ-6R. I prefer the naked version plus the R just came out so impossible to find used.

What are thoughts about this bike and why? I am thinking about this or the Ninja 650R and possible the Triumph Street Triple (a co-worker will sell me his CHEAP). In reality cost is not that much of an issue, so no broken heart if/when it dumps.

I am 6’3” about 205lbs and have a 34’ inseam.

I sat on the Ninja 250R and I am just no comfortable, I feel cramped. I have also taken and passed the MSF course and purchased all the protective gear, sparing no expense.

Just because its said so often I have to mention it, some people DO learn on the fastest, my first car was a BMW M3, never a speeding ticket or accident in my life.
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Old 07-28-2009, 09:53 PM   #332
newagetwotone
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Look at the Ninja 500 or Sv650. the FZ6 still isnt a starter bike. Starting on an M3 probably wasnt the smartest thing, but bikes are totally differnt than cars, don't try and fool yourself into thinking that their anything like each other.

To be honest, go sit on a Ninja 500 or SV650 and then go buy one used, you ARE going to dump your bike at some point and theres no point in dumping a BRAND new bike repeatedly. Even a year or two old bike will save you some cash, not to mention the SV650 doesnt have as much plastic. Another tip, if you can find some dirt, flat patted down dry dirt and grass, ride around on it.
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Old 07-28-2009, 11:01 PM   #333
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Originally Posted by newagetwotone View Post
Look at the Ninja 500 or Sv650. the FZ6 still isnt a starter bike. Starting on an M3 probably wasnt the smartest thing, but bikes are totally differnt than cars, don't try and fool yourself into thinking that their anything like each other.
I am confused an SV650 is a 649cc with 70 HP, so why is this bike said to be good for beginners? In a lot of reviews they compare the SV650 to the FZ-6. The FZ-6 is a retuned version of the R6's engine and the Triumph's engine is a retuned version of the Daytona's engine. So is it really the engine size or is it how the engine is tuned to run? Is the HP? the torque? the power band? What is the main issue and driving factors that make the SV650 acceptable and others not??

Also, I like the SV but it is real hard 06', 07' or 98' model in So FL.

I looked at the Ninja 500 and found it short and cramped plus I don't really want a bike with all that plastic (not to mention a very dated look).

Also, never said starting in an M3 was good idea, but simply saying that some do start on the fastest and I know bikes are NOTHING like cars.
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Old 07-29-2009, 10:14 AM   #334
trenttheuncatchable
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What you want is to get some miles under your belt on a bike that is relatively light and relatively forgiving on the throttle. You don't want it to get away from you when something unexpected happens, like misjudging a turn or hitting an unexpected bump.

I'm surprised no-one has told you to start on a KLR650 yet.
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Old 07-29-2009, 11:40 AM   #335
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What you want is to get some miles under your belt on a bike that is relatively light and relatively forgiving on the throttle. You don't want it to get away from you when something unexpected happens, like misjudging a turn or hitting an unexpected bump.
I can understand those concerns, I do and Trust me, I understand, I get it, a beginner on a small bike will help mitigate the risks associated with riding.

But what you are saying is that something is “unexpected”, by definition it means something that happens without warning. So shouldn’t that apply to every rider out there? If you are going to say a more experienced rider would know how to deal with it, then it is not “unexpected”… right?

Getting miles under your belt with road experience… there is no substitute for that, you have to do it to get it. Completely agree with that.

I understand a beginner is more susceptible to making mistakes, but so is every rider for that sake. I find it hard to believe that somebody out there can handle everything that is thrown their way. Heck my MSF instructor just got out of a week stint in the hospital after spilling, and he has been riding for over 15 years.

So light, smaller bikes are better to learn with, right? Then why do I see folks recommend cruisers, and most every cruiser I know of is much heavier than a sport style bike. Doesn't heavier means slower braking and greater effort to make maneuver? So how can those be recommended for a new rider?

From my understanding a lot of bikes have adjustable throttle controls, so can't that make an impact... yes?

It seems to me that a lot, if not most, of these issues deals with confidence, reaction and basic (or advanced) riding techniques and understandings.

Quote:
Originally Posted by trenttheuncatchable View Post
I'm surprised no-one has told you to start on a KLR650 yet.
A bike that is way to much focused for dual-purpose, I do not ever plan on taking the bike off the road. Plus, wouldn't a bike that, with tires like that provide worse traction for road riding?

Just so you know, I really do appreciate all the feedback and input, and I do want to do this right. But I just need to understand the logic and theory behind it. It is just the engineer in me.
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Old 07-29-2009, 10:45 PM   #336
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The unexpected happens to beginners because they lack experience. After they gain experience, those previously unexpected and unexperienced events aren't (unexpected and unexperienced) anymore, or to a much lesser degree.

Adjustable throttle control doesn't help when a beginner opens up the throttle too much too fast due to some unforeseen event.

Cruisers are not recommended as beginner bikes. Like you say, even the smaller cruisers are heavy bikes. Heavy bikes are not easy to maneuver at slower speeds. Beginners tend to drop them. The problem is that some people have to have a cruiser, so they get a Sportster or some such bike, because that's the smallest cruiser available. But that doesn't make it a good choice. A good cruiser for a first bike would be a Honda Rebel, but that would be cramped for you, too.

This is going to be your first bike. The KLR is relatively light, is pretty much indestructible, has a 35 inch seat height, and a large gas tank. You don't have to take it off-road for it to be a good beginner bike for you. The tires should be fine, but if they are too knobby for you, then put some road tires on it. And this has been said many times before, but just in case you missed it, buy your first bike used.

Just fyi, you're not the only engineer on this board.

Last edited by trenttheuncatchable : 07-29-2009 at 10:47 PM. Reason: forgot to mention Rebel 250
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Old 07-30-2009, 05:47 AM   #337
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Quote:
Originally Posted by trenttheuncatchable View Post
The unexpected happens to beginners because they lack experience. After they gain experience, those previously unexpected and unexperienced events aren't (unexpected and unexperienced) anymore, or to a much lesser degree.

Adjustable throttle control doesn't help when a beginner opens up the throttle too much too fast due to some unforeseen event.

Cruisers are not recommended as beginner bikes. Like you say, even the smaller cruisers are heavy bikes. Heavy bikes are not easy to maneuver at slower speeds. Beginners tend to drop them. The problem is that some people have to have a cruiser, so they get a Sportster or some such bike, because that's the smallest cruiser available. But that doesn't make it a good choice. A good cruiser for a first bike would be a Honda Rebel, but that would be cramped for you, too.

This is going to be your first bike. The KLR is relatively light, is pretty much indestructible, has a 35 inch seat height, and a large gas tank. You don't have to take it off-road for it to be a good beginner bike for you. The tires should be fine, but if they are too knobby for you, then put some road tires on it. And this has been said many times before, but just in case you missed it, buy your first bike used.

Just fyi, you're not the only engineer on this board.
You also forgot to mention the Suzuki DRZ400SM.
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Old 07-30-2009, 06:26 AM   #338
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"Just because its said so often I have to mention it, some people DO learn on the fastest,..."

And the vast majority get hurt very badly or killed trying to learn on the fastest. Is it worth your life trying to figure out if you are one of the very few? go look up all the world class athletes that have messed themslves up learning on 'the fastest'. Google Ben Rothlesburger, Kellen Winslow Jr., and Jay Williams. They either destroyed their career or nearly did by being on a fast motorcycle with zero experience, so how do you rate your chance of survival now?
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Last edited by longride : 07-30-2009 at 06:32 AM.
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Old 07-30-2009, 08:25 AM   #339
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Yea, Big Ben Rothlesburger is a great quarterback but man did the whole city look stupid when he planted his face in the pavement.

On top of that the next season he played for **** because he was still shaken by it,....
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Old 08-11-2009, 02:54 PM   #340
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hello .
this really very good idea .
this is an easy one. Pick up a Dual Purpose bike like the KX250 or a used Sherpa. Take the M SF safety course. Ride the DP until you are competent. You might just decide to stick with a DP. It's just as stupid to start with a rice rocket on the street is it would be to start with a CR500 on the dirt.
nice idea to create this .
keep posting to us daily .
thank you .

jumbip


cant catch able motorcycle ..............motorcycle forum
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