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Old 06-25-2009, 09:24 PM   #321
seruzawa
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Originally Posted by skx2251 View Post
Thanks. I live in SoCal and after a few weeks/months riding on the side streets to get some experience I will eventually have to commute on the freeways. Will the 535 have enough hp to keep me out of trouble?
Read this guy's impressions.

Ken Yamaha - 1996 Yamaha XV535 Virago Motorcycle Review; What's not to like about 535cc Yamaha's?
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Old 06-25-2009, 09:43 PM   #322
newagetwotone
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Shoot. Is there anything that looks like it?
How about the KTM Duke 690? 659cc single cylinder bike. PLENTY fast.



how about the Buell blast? Single cylinder 500cc



or... hm. SV650? 650 Vtwin



or the Kawasaki Er-6n 650 parrell twin





Think of it this way, no more than 2 cylinders and no more than 650ccs.
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Old 06-26-2009, 04:43 PM   #323
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How about a Ducati Monster 696?
Would it be suitable for a 1st bike?
It has the looks and just 50cc above the limit for a twin.
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Old 06-26-2009, 09:01 PM   #324
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How about a Ducati Monster 696?
Would it be suitable for a 1st bike?
It has the looks and just 50cc above the limit for a twin.
The monster 69x series are pretty good, you're better off buying used so i'd see if you can find a used 695 instead. (cheaper bike means when you dump it, and you will, you will die a little less inside.)

a tip, if you have a flat grassy place to do it, try riding it in the lawn. We have a big open field at our familys cabin and both the guys that just got harleys took them up there and road around the yard, dumped a couple times but its grass, only problem they had was dirt on the foot pegs.
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Old 07-21-2009, 07:35 AM   #325
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Brief self intro: spankin' new to street riding (with 100+ trail hours). My godfather threw me onto a '07 ZX-6R Kawasaki. I'm wondering what the "slipper clutch" is all about. Thanks any/everyone who is willing to shed some light on the function for me. BTW...I like the bike very much...descent ergo.'s and I'm 6' 4" 195lbs. Smooth (gasing is a lil abrupt...go figure LOL) and tame under 7000 RPM. I don't like learning to ride the streets on this modified (100 hp) monster, but it's not too bad. "NEVER LOOK A GIFT HORSE IN THE MOUTH" lmao
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Old 07-21-2009, 07:46 AM   #326
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There's this thing called wikipedia:

A slipper clutch (also known as a slider clutch or back-torque limiter) is a specialized clutch developed for performance oriented motorcycles to mitigate the effects of engine braking when riders decelerate as they enter corners. They are designed to partially disengage or "slip" when the rear wheel tries to drive the engine faster than it would run under its own power. The engine braking forces in conventional clutches will normally be transmitted back along the drive chain causing the rear wheel to hop, chatter or lose traction. This is especially noted on larger displacement four-stroke engines, which have greater engine braking than their two-stroke or smaller displacement counterparts. Slipper clutches eliminate this extra loading on the rear suspension giving riders a more predictable ride and minimize the risk of over-reving the engine during downshifts. Slipper clutches can also prevent a catastrophic rear wheel lockup in case of engine seizure or transmission failure. Generally, the amount of force needed to disengage the clutch is adjustable to suit the application.
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Old 07-21-2009, 07:49 AM   #327
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There's this thing called wikipedia:

A slipper clutch (also known as a slider clutch or back-torque limiter) is a specialized clutch developed for performance oriented motorcycles to mitigate the effects of engine braking when riders decelerate as they enter corners. They are designed to partially disengage or "slip" when the rear wheel tries to drive the engine faster than it would run under its own power. The engine braking forces in conventional clutches will normally be transmitted back along the drive chain causing the rear wheel to hop, chatter or lose traction. This is especially noted on larger displacement four-stroke engines, which have greater engine braking than their two-stroke or smaller displacement counterparts. Slipper clutches eliminate this extra loading on the rear suspension giving riders a more predictable ride and minimize the risk of over-reving the engine during downshifts. Slipper clutches can also prevent a catastrophic rear wheel lockup in case of engine seizure or transmission failure. Generally, the amount of force needed to disengage the clutch is adjustable to suit the application.

I always just match the RPMs on downshift so I need no slipper clutch. At least on the street anyway.
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Old 07-21-2009, 07:51 AM   #328
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Originally Posted by River_1 View Post
Brief self intro: spankin' new to street riding (with 100+ trail hours). My godfather threw me onto a '07 ZX-6R Kawasaki. I'm wondering what the "slipper clutch" is all about. Thanks any/everyone who is willing to shed some light on the function for me. BTW...I like the bike very much...descent ergo.'s and I'm 6' 4" 195lbs. Smooth (gasing is a lil abrupt...go figure LOL) and tame under 7000 RPM. I don't like learning to ride the streets on this modified (100 hp) monster, but it's not too bad. "NEVER LOOK A GIFT HORSE IN THE MOUTH" lmao
Your godfather is a certified idiot and complete tool. Park the race bike and but something smaller. If he has a problem with it tell him its nice to know he wants to you be a veg. from smashing yourself into a truck.

Seriously? what is with parents, friends and relatives that put people on bikes like this their first time? Isn't there a "negligence Murder" charge that should apply here?


To be honest and calm, you probably are better off parking it and buying a ninja 250/500, nighthawk 250 or anything else that is smaller and/or has less cylinders and your better off the quicker you do it.
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Old 07-21-2009, 07:53 AM   #329
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Originally Posted by newagetwotone View Post
Your godfather is a certified idiot and complete tool. Park the race bike and but something smaller. If he has a problem with it tell him its nice to know he wants to you be a veg. from smashing yourself into a truck.

Seriously? what is with parents, friends and relatives that put people on bikes like this their first time? Isn't there a "negligence Murder" charge that should apply here?


To be honest and calm, you probably are better off parking it and buying a ninja 250/500, nighthawk 250 or anything else that is smaller and/or has less cylinders and your better off the quicker you do it.

I was having a good chat with my month old son about getting a motorcycle(street) in 16 years. I'll get him on a dirtbike in 6 years tops.
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Old 07-21-2009, 08:04 AM   #330
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Default Wikipedia...duh, visceral desriptions are always better.

I'm 25, but judicious (spelling?...as if I really cared) with brake, throttle and speed (I actually obey ALL traffic laws). I understand the 'out of the box' concern, Newagetwotone. Thank you for the advice, gentlemen. Sarcasm aside, I'd greatly appreciate any tips (besides taking a course).
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