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-   -   Dropped Your Bike Lately? (http://www.motorcycle.com/forum/learning-ride/6847-dropped-your-bike-lately.html)

longride 12-07-2007 07:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenneth_Moore (Post 174728)
Yes, but we get to eat quality microwaveable snackage from vending machines, drink obscene amounts of sugar and caffine, and waste endless hours goofing off at websites like Motorcycle.com!

Besides, I don't even know Jim.

I am also in IT, and I am discovering that it will slowly turn you into a marshmellow. :-D

sarnali2 12-07-2007 07:29 AM

What a bunch o' pansies! Being a rufty tufty biker and Union Boilerman eating sardines on toast for lunch and drinking Guinness for dinner gives me the rugged physique required for this sort of thing. I either place my Manly Biker Boot on the gas tank and shove or if I feel lazy, give the bike a steely eyed glare that would make Chuck Norris wet his kakkies and it jumps back on the kickstand by itself.....

mscuddy 12-07-2007 07:44 AM

When the kickstand bolt failed on my City X (Friday night in Bob's Big Boy's parking lot) it was like trying to deadlift 400 lbs of wet cement. Didn't realize how top-heavy those XBs are. Considering the crankshaft centerline is about 4 inches above the swingarm pivot. Why do they handle so dang good?

Kenneth_Moore 12-07-2007 07:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sarnali2 (Post 174733)
What a bunch o' pansies! Being a rufty tufty biker and Union Boilerman eating sardines on toast for lunch and drinking Guinness for dinner gives me the rugged physique required for this sort of thing. I either place my Manly Biker Boot on the gas tank and shove or if I feel lazy, give the bike a steely eyed glare that would make Chuck Norris wet his kakkies and it jumps back on the kickstand by itself.....

Geez, a guy who actually works for a living. Hell, I don't even have to program. I just sit around helping brain-dead technicians configure and troubleshoot Windows systems that run card-access control systems and video monitors. 4 years of college, 2 years grad school, for this... At least it keeps Cheerios in the kid and gas in the bike!

sarnali2 12-07-2007 07:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mscuddy (Post 174734)
Considering the crankshaft centerline is about 4 inches above the swingarm pivot. Why do they handle so dang good?


PFM I guess, Ol' Eric knows his business....

seruzawa 12-07-2007 08:43 AM

Heh heh.
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by 12er (Post 174692)
The back to it method works great, learned it from a KLR forum and tested it on my KLR, K1200RS and a rental K1200LT. Ok, Tested is probably the wrong word, used it, now thats better.

I left the KLR idling on a hillside and it managed to vibrate the kick stand out from under it.

Making a quick run to the store, backed my KRS out of the garage and discovered how slick wet grass can be. Made a controlled fall onto the grass, minor bent rear brake lever and tiny scratch, lucked out with no broken plastic.

Rental LT, learned the kickstand should move farther forward than I expected. Got off, walked away and looked back to watch it slowly fall over. Thank God I'm huge, or that thing probably would still be stitting in that parking lot.

"Controlled fall." Excellent use of facts, data and BS. Well done. That's extra credit for you.

bbtowns 12-07-2007 09:01 AM

This method works really well, unless the handlebars are below the wheels, then it seems hard to get ahold of anything that way. I've done this quite a bit dual sporting. Also had the kickstand to my Concours (fully loaded, with 14 days worth of gear) sink in to the pavement at Arches Natl. Park. Got back to the bike at dusk with nobody in sight and managed to get it upright using this method. I give adrenaline the credit.

SmokeU 12-07-2007 11:51 AM

I haven't been down in 7+ years, and then it was a '94 Magna and I had just got out of the Army. I just yanked the bike up and it died when the rear tire touched down again. The damn thing was running as it lay on it's side.

New tires + gravel + off camber corner = oops

seruzawa 12-07-2007 12:14 PM

Well, I'm exhausted!
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Kenneth_Moore (Post 174736)
Geez, a guy who actually works for a living. Hell, I don't even have to program. I just sit around helping brain-dead technicians configure and troubleshoot Windows systems that run card-access control systems and video monitors. 4 years of college, 2 years grad school, for this... At least it keeps Cheerios in the kid and gas in the bike!

I actually had to go down to the shop yesterday and help a technician. I even had to turn on a waveform analyzer! Oh, the horror. It might take me a week to recover. Fortunately I have a lot of compiling to do.

sarnali2 12-07-2007 01:05 PM

I had to go to our other plant today and start up a larger boiler because my 3rd shift guy didn't think we'd need it and the smaller one would do. Well 3rd shift is a minimum maintanance crew, the heat load is light because the buildings stay closed up, when everyone shows up in the morning and opens doors and the flow control valves open up the demand goes through the roof, return temps. drop and I start getting phone calls. So I hops in my little service van and off I go, spend an hour bringing the boiler on line and stabalizing the plant, spend another hour kissing everyones butt and assuring them it won't happen again...no, we don't need a corrective action memo...it's not an engineering issue...it's difficult to predict the heat load and "we" erred on the side of saving fuel and running #2 boiler at a higher, more efficiant load etc, etc..... I should have just said "sorry the 3rd shift guy is a short timer and you can't pry him off his butt and out of his chair without a 2x4".....after that it was a stop at Starbucks for a latte`, back to the office and a nap till lunch...

I'm a Union man, what do you expect....


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