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Old 02-22-2011, 05:37 AM   #21
acecycleins
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Honestly, you are 3 yrs outside of the skill set needed for the 675 or 1050 motor bikes. BUT- the original 3 cyl 855 cc Triumph Thunderbirds that were made from 1996 to 2001 are great bikes. You have to look at the forums for the things you need to be aware of (like rusting fasteners), but overall you wouldn't be disappointed.
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Old 02-22-2011, 08:12 AM   #22
trenttheuncatchable
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Stick with the bikes you were considering on your first post on this thread. After you've been on one of those for a year or so, then figure out what you want to ride next.
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Old 02-22-2011, 02:41 PM   #23
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Honestly, you are 3 yrs outside of the skill set needed for the 675 or 1050 motor bikes. BUT- the original 3 cyl 855 cc Triumph Thunderbirds that were made from 1996 to 2001 are great bikes. You have to look at the forums for the things you need to be aware of (like rusting fasteners), but overall you wouldn't be disappointed.

I understand, I don't want to get something that I will injure myself or damage the bike seriously on and miss the majority of a season. I'll keep an eye out for those thunderbirds. If I wanna go triumph right now my best shot is the triumph america.
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Old 02-22-2011, 02:44 PM   #24
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Stick with the bikes you were considering on your first post on this thread. After you've been on one of those for a year or so, then figure out what you want to ride next.
I see where your coming from.

The 4 bikes Im considering now with everyones input are:

Triumph America
Harley 883XL
Honda Shadow VT750

Suzuki GSF650 bandit
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Old 02-22-2011, 07:03 PM   #25
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How are the Yamaha FZ6's compared to the Suzuki GSF650's?
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Old 02-22-2011, 07:38 PM   #26
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How are the Yamaha FZ6's compared to the Suzuki GSF650's?
99hp is a little too much for a 1st bike, really. They are great bikes, but your 2 up WILL NOT appreciate the seating. The Bandito will be much more forgiving in all areas. Seems like they even offer an ABS version if you want the techno version. The Galdius would not be such a bad choice, but it's ugly sister the DL650 V-Strom will be way more comfortable. I'm still leaning toward the Bandito if you don't locate a Bonni. You'll certainly be able to ride across country with a Bandit compared to ALL the others.
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Old 02-22-2011, 07:54 PM   #27
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99hp is a little too much for a 1st bike, really. They are great bikes, but your 2 up WILL NOT appreciate the seating. The Bandito will be much more forgiving in all areas. Seems like they even offer an ABS version if you want the techno version. The Galdius would not be such a bad choice, but it's ugly sister the DL650 V-Strom will be way more comfortable. I'm still leaning toward the Bandito if you don't locate a Bonni. You'll certainly be able to ride across country with a Bandit compared to ALL the others.

Ah fair enough. The bandito seems the way to go as far as "sport tourers" go. I suppose the honda would make a better cross country bike but wouldn't be nearly as nimble as the bandito. Does ABS dramatically reduce the risk of high siding/low siding?

Also are motorcycle test drives something a dealer should offer and if they don't should I be wary of them? Or is that just something some dealers provide and others prefer not to. I ask because the local Harley dealer dealership said they don't do test rides except for 2-3 times a season and thats only for new harleys.

Again I really appreciate your help
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Old 02-23-2011, 08:29 AM   #28
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It's not that simple and answer.

ABS keeps the wheels from locking, so you are less apt to 'skid'.

A high-side happens when you lose the rear tires' traction, then get it back. ABS may not prevent that, as the tire may still be rotating, but not at road speed.

A low-side happens when the front, or both tires lose traction. ABS again may not stop that from occurring.

All that being said, ABS is a nice thing to have 'in your back pocket.' If you ride 'properly,' and luck is with you, you may never use it.

And Demo rides are usually a Dealer thing. Demo policies are based on availability, liability, trust (history), and how bad they want to sell.
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Old 02-23-2011, 04:36 PM   #29
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It's not that simple and answer.

ABS keeps the wheels from locking, so you are less apt to 'skid'.

A high-side happens when you lose the rear tires' traction, then get it back. ABS may not prevent that, as the tire may still be rotating, but not at road speed.

A low-side happens when the front, or both tires lose traction. ABS again may not stop that from occurring.

All that being said, ABS is a nice thing to have 'in your back pocket.' If you ride 'properly,' and luck is with you, you may never use it.

And Demo rides are usually a Dealer thing. Demo policies are based on availability, liability, trust (history), and how bad they want to sell.

Ah I get what your saying, ABS might help in an emergency but theres no substitute for for safe riding practices.


I went to a local dealer today and sat on the bandito again along with a 2000 kawasaki ZX600 E8. I preferred the riding position slightly better on the ZX600 but both bikes were very nice.

I noticed something interesting on the cruisers I tried.

The salesman had me sit on two honda VT750's. The first was a 2002 with chain drive, the second a 2008 model with shaft drive. I noticed that the honda with chain drive felt much lighter than the one with shaft drive. This seemed to be true with all the belt/chain drive cruisers I tried out vs the shaft drive ones. I might be crazy but it seems this way to me.


Also here are a few more sport style bikes I saw today. Not sure if any of them are novice friendly enough though. From the looks of them they looked to be much too hot.

Year: 1997 Make: Kawasaki Model: ZX 750 P2
Year: 2003 Make: Kawasaki Model: ZX 636 B1
Year: 2006 Make: Kawasaki Model: ZX 600 J6F
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Old 02-23-2011, 08:56 PM   #30
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Unless you plan on liability only on this three bikes it's not worth the investment. As for your Honda vs Bandit. Every guy here would choose the Bandit for long haul riding hands down. It's a great all arounder.
Chain vs Shaft- Chain is lighter, better power to the ground ratio and easy to change sprockets for track or drive ratio. Shaft- cost very little to maintain, weighs more and makes less power to the ground. It's a personal choice really. I like shaft bikes but currently own a chain bike. I've owned more shaft bikes than chain and prefer them overall.
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