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Old 06-07-2010, 10:19 PM   #1
JD33
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Default Fz6r for begginer

I just finished my driving school and I have been feeling pretty confident about riding, I mainly rode the 250r ninja and it is a nice little bike don't get me wrong but i feel like it would loose my interest pretty fast. Also it is very light i don't know how much i would trust it at higher speeds. And I also don't want to go through the hassle or re-selling (I know it has a good re-sale value but its still a hassle getting all the paper work)


I have been thinking of something a bit bigger, maybe a 500 or a less aggressive 600. I have had my eye on the fz6r and there are alot of things about it I like. I would like to get your opinions on it, is this realistic or will i just kill myself on this bike. Has anyone started out on this bike, would it be possible to put a beginner on it. I have done some research on it and from what i have read yamaha has done some things to make it more begginer frendly (more linear acceleration, lower seat, upright seating, tighter triangle it is definatly no r6.)
I have found some sites that mention it as a good begginer bike but i would like to get your opinions on it.
http://www.beginnermotorcyclereviews...w-riders-2010/

http://ca.askmen.com/top_10/cars/top...r-bikes_4.html

Thanks JD

p.s sorry for the essay
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Old 06-08-2010, 05:18 AM   #2
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How many miles have you ridden the 250r? The weight at higher speeds should be no problem. Besides the light weight will be what saves you in an accident. The heavier FZ6 will be a bit more difficult when you have to throw it from side to side quick to avoid some cager.

My advice, stay with the 250 and stop worrying about how much paper work is involved when selling it, or that it's to small. Worry about learning to be defensive, becoming comfortable on the bike and start learning so you become even more confident. Keep it for two years, get some serious mileage under your belt first then think about moving up.
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Old 06-08-2010, 05:57 AM   #3
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FZ6 = piss-poor choice for a beginner.

Avoid new and shiny like the zombie plague; it will only end in tears. Buy old, ugly, and as scuffed (but well-running!) as possible.

Listen to Moke - stay alive to acquire the skills to ride that FZ (or some other bike that catches your fancy 'twixt now and then) in a few years.
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Old 06-08-2010, 12:28 PM   #4
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I've never heard anyone complain about a bike being too light. Stability has more to do with suspension, geometry, and tires than anything else, and suspensions have to work much harder as the weight increases. Now "smoothness" is another thing, a heavier bike, set up well, MAY feel smoother over rough pavement, but that has nothing to do with stability.

But if you're still worried, just eat a couple dozen cheeseburgers before every ride. And get the 250 (or one of the many many other bikes that have been recommended on this board for beginners). Don't worry about resale - it takes 5 minutes to sell a bike you own the title on.
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Old 06-08-2010, 01:28 PM   #5
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FZ6 is not a good bike for beginners. The FZ6 is not kind to new riders -- read the reviews. Many authors have noted an abrupt clutch engagement, which is NOT GOOD for beginners.

If you feel too cramped on the Ninjette (250), then consider the Ninja 500 or perhaps even the Ninja 650.
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Old 06-08-2010, 09:24 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dr_Sprocket View Post
FZ6 is not a good bike for beginners. The FZ6 is not kind to new riders -- read the reviews. Many authors have noted an abrupt clutch engagement, which is NOT GOOD for beginners.

If you feel too cramped on the Ninjette (250), then consider the Ninja 500 or perhaps even the Ninja 650.
Having ridden the OLD EX250, and several EX500s, I have to say just by the looks of the the NEW EX250 that it will be kinder to long-legged riders than either of the former. However, I'm 5'10" with a 32" inseam, and managed just fine on both of them.
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Old 06-10-2010, 05:04 AM   #7
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I have been a member on here for a while and I read a lot about what I could in the beginning as I still do when I have the chance on here.

Before even considering ANY motorcycle get the right gear. Seriously.

Now with that being said- last year after a terrible string of **** in four weeks (I had two pups pass away four weeks apart (9 and 11 years old, but forever pups to me) I went and bought my very first motorcycle: a 2007 fz6.

I knew then that this may not be the best choice. I knew then that I was starting off too large and whatnot. At that point I didn't care. Of course I dropped it the first day. I had never been taught directly and all I ever knew about motorcycling was what I have heard over the years and what the kind people on here are willing to share. 10-15 MPH drop taking a turn. Likely you will not be doing this due to your experiences thus far, but it gets better.

So I bought the fz6 last year in the end of July. It sat in my garage for the next many months until I felt right about riding it with a much more clear head. Fast forward to mid-april and I had gotten my permit.

So here I am learning on this fantastic motorcycle. I am a 38 year old man with a lot of respect for both the bike and especially other drivers. As was once said to me years ago, "when on a motorcycle out have to ride like you are invisible. Because you are."

Is the bike too much to learn on? No. Is it more risky due to the power and weight? YES!

Yes- you will wish for bigger and better in short time if you get the 250, but I also know from my own experience that you will feel the same way starting off at any motorcycle you start on. And I also know that you will develop into a stronger and better rider starting on a smaller bike to get you maneuvering down.

I love my bike. I bought it with 386 miles on it and I have thrown in over 1000 more since April. But their are scrapes. There are cracks. There is a dent. I am actively learning and I knew this would all happen. One accident was my fault. The one that happened Tuesday wasn't my fault. I sit here healing as I type this all in in my phone. No joke. And I will be riding again. Very very soon. I will be riding again soon for I was wearing my vanson jacket, jeans, my arai helmet, and laced up shoes. I have gauntlet gloves, and like an ass I just didn't wear them.

But details on that story in my next post...
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Old 06-10-2010, 05:28 AM   #8
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Thanks for your input, korie.

But I have to note: being a beginner yourself, and making a poor choice for your first bike (and admittedly dropping it right off the bat) you have not proven the exception - but rather the Rule.

I must beg to differ with you on moto-choice, as I have one of the first FZ6's sold in the US (and have put over 60-times the mileage you have on yours). It is NOT even an "acceptable" beginner's bike.

However, you are 100% spot-on as to the Gear.

I wish you well, Ride Safe.
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Old 06-10-2010, 05:47 AM   #9
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Korie, nothing personal, but your post is nonsense:

I knew then that I was starting off too large and whatnot. At that point I didn't care. Of course I dropped it the first day.

You're lucky that's all that happened. For a lot of riders who went in over their head, they died the first day. Or got maimed, or destroyed their bike, etc. Why would anyone do that?

And I also know that you will develop into a stronger and better rider starting on a smaller bike to get you maneuvering down.

Nothing could be further from the truth. A lightweight, less powerful bike will build confidence and skills much faster than a heavy, fast bike that scares the crap out of it's rider.

It sat in my garage for the next many months until I felt right about riding it with a much more clear head.

Meditation and prayer are no substitute for saddle time. If you'd spent those months practicing on the right bike, you'd be a much better rider today.

Look, everybody has to go their own way with life, bikes, whatever. Maybe buying and wrecking an FZ6 for your first bike was your destiny, but let's not recommend it to others. For most people, a starter bike like a Ninja 250 is a far better way to get into motorcycling.
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Old 06-10-2010, 06:57 AM   #10
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I believe you both are not understanding what I wrote or rather why I wrote it. I agree with you both. In fact I was writing all of that to explain as to why I agree with starting off with a 250.

In no way at all am I stating to go bigger than a 250. In fact I wrote that to warn against going bigger than a 250. I crashed. First day. I didn't have the skill. I know this. I knew this buying it.

If you read again what I was saying in there you may notice me saying this. In no way am I saying to do as I have done. I said a 250 will give you better experience and start you off better than an fz6. You will get better agility and all of that on a 250 and build your core better than on a bigger bike.

I listed what happened with me to explain as to why a 250 is a better choice. I know I am repeating myself but I am hoping this sinks in. Staring off big is not a better choice.

I was in a bad place in my head last year. "Meditation" was not what I was doing. I bought the fz6 due to a whim and I knew that going in. I would have crashed going around that corner the way I did no matter what size bike I was on at that time the same way (I just didn't know how to turn at the time). I let the bike sit because the prior three years was awful (my dad getting a triple bypass, then pancreatic cancer, then dying, then a divorce, then being stuck with the house and commute ($350 gas and tolls every month + 1600 mortgage to pay alone now), Franklin (my boxer) gets lymphoma and passes that same month after being told he had about a year, and four weeks after he passes I walk downstairs and find my Doberman that I rescued has passed away within a half-hour from bloat (I bought the bike the day after I found Bebe)).

I wasn't ready for a bike. Not then. In April I felt ready to learn. Got my permit. Wasn't fully ready for the bike I had, but I already had it. Didn't crash again until Tuesday. I know that bike is better than me. I treat it with respect. I do not feel anybody should start off with a bike of this stature. I really don't.

Again- the first post I put in this thread is to state an example as to why to NOT START ON A 600. I crashed. On a 600. First day. Whatever excuses I may have they are only excuses. The explanation is that I started with zero experience and no help or lessons. It could have been much worse. DO NOT FOLLOW MY EXAMPLE.

Buy and wear your gear. Get lessons and when you think you are good enough get more lessons. Wanna spend money? Buy better gear.
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