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Old 05-20-2010, 01:49 PM   #31
ejis
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Good choice skakebite. Second (third? fourth?) the used bike recommendations, but that price on the 250 seems pretty good. Just go into it knowing that you will take more of a hit when you sell it than buying already used, and that you will be dropping a new bike rather than one that has probably been dropped before.
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Old 05-20-2010, 08:05 PM   #32
SnakeBite
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I know it's very easy to drop a bike, but putting this as a definite thing to happen is just not right. I do believe that every rider can be extra cautious when learning, unless the student is too dumb to figure out that this bike could be dropped off easily, and I'm sure there are some out there who do that.
Although I do agree about buying a used one instead of new one in terms of resale value, but I'd rather not go to the mechanic every now and then, plus, it just feels better to own a new bike that have never been driven before, and as I figured out, it loses around 800-1000 of its value in a year, which is not too much money to learn riding a bike "properly".
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Old 05-20-2010, 08:18 PM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SnakeBite View Post
I know it's very easy to drop a bike, but putting this as a definite thing to happen is just not right. I do believe that every rider can be extra cautious when learning, unless the student is too dumb to figure out that this bike could be dropped off easily, and I'm sure there are some out there who do that.
Although I do agree about buying a used one instead of new one in terms of resale value, but I'd rather not go to the mechanic every now and then, plus, it just feels better to own a new bike that have never been driven before, and as I figured out, it loses around 800-1000 of its value in a year, which is not too much money to learn riding a bike "properly".
It is true that some people won't drop their bike. I'm gambling myself, I went new (a cruiser). I also bought engine guards specifically to try to provide some protection in case I do, and I am waiting to put on nice (expensive) saddlebags or aftermarket exhaust until I've been riding for a year or two so I don't mess up nice/expensive parts if I drop it. The vast majority of new riders drop their bike at some point, it would be irresponsible not to be prepared for/expect that possibility. Don't delude yourself into thinking you'll be the exception since so few people ever are the exception (hence, them being the exception).

As for new v. used, I agree that used is usually better. However, if you are prepared to possibly drop a new bike, if you are prepared for the depreciation, and if you can afford it, there is nothing wrong with buying new. Just keep in mind that if you are buying a starter bike (which is a good idea) that you plan to replace in a year or two, you have the choice of losing a thousand or so by buying new, or possibly selling it for what you paid for it if you go used. Also, keeping in mind that many/most people drop their bike at some point, keep in mind your personal psychology- would you be able to blow off the scratches on your new bike and/or be able to comfortably afford to get the damages fixed (in which case new is fine), or will it really bother you (in which case, used and pre-scratched may be a good idea).

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Old 05-20-2010, 08:56 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by SnakeBite View Post
I know it's very easy to drop a bike, but putting this as a definite thing to happen is just not right.
You are correct that it is not inherently inevitable. But it is a high risk. I'd put it up there with grinding the back tire on a curb when driving a car. Very few people can say they have never eer done it at some point.

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Originally Posted by SnakeBite View Post
Although I do agree about buying a used one instead of new one in terms of resale value, but I'd rather not go to the mechanic every now and then, plus, it just feels better to own a new bike that have never been driven before, and as I figured out, it loses around 800-1000 of its value in a year, which is not too much money to learn riding a bike "properly".
Buying used doesn't mean buying a beat-up junker. You could find one that was ridden 500 miles before the first owner decided they didn't want it. Yeah, likely the clutch is going to be a little worn. And, chances are if they were a new rider and not responsible enough to do a little research and sampling to make sure they wanted to ride before buying a brand new bike, the engine wasn't completely broken in properly. But if you are going to sell it in a few thousand miles anyways, what difference does it make that the engine will need a rebuild at 40k miles instead of 60k miles (or whatever), or that the clutch will need rebuilding in 20k miles instead of 30k (or whatever)?

Again, if you were really planning on keeping it for an extended period of time, then yeah I'd say go new. I just bought a brand new car for that exact reason--I wanted to be sure it was maintained, not abused, not driven through every pot hole without a care, etc etc, and I am planning on driving it into the grund. But, since you are already expecting to sell it relatively quickly (like, maybe in a season or two), I wouldn't bother going for the mint-condition bike which you will not own for long enough to see the benefit of the extra money spent.


Now, nobody is stopping you from getting a new bike, because we can all understand the appeal of having something brand new. However, since you yourself have expressed concern with the money lost after quickly reselling a newly-purchased bike, we are just making sure you get what you ultimately want.
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Old 05-21-2010, 07:47 AM   #35
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JMcDonald I totally agree with you. However, there are so many reasons on why I want to start with a new bike, although starting with a used bike is the right choice.

Here are some of the reasons on why I'm buying a new bike:

-One of my friends will be buying my bike in a year, resale value isn't an issue now.
-Financing a bike is a good start to build good credit, since the loan is small relatively. Although my credit score is good, I just never had taken a loan that big. Also, interest rate is lower on new bikes.
-Buying a new bike means a new bike, you don't need to worry about it's condition, plus, it cuts down the "looking for" time compared to looking for a used one, and since I work full-time (8-5) I won't be having enough time to look around, and most of those dealerships close around 6.

Hope this explains my views.
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Old 05-21-2010, 08:15 AM   #36
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Well, if you're going to be applying logic...

I just don't know if you're going to fit in around here!



Seriously, it sounds like you are thinking this through.

Try to get as good a deal as you can, and see if the Dealership will give you a good discount on PPE.
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Old 05-21-2010, 09:04 AM   #37
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Snakebite -that seems like fairly sound reasoning. You better stop that before getting on one of them dangerous modercicles.

With any new bike, remember that the tires and brakes are brand new and need to be treated as such.
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Old 05-21-2010, 09:12 AM   #38
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You better stop that before getting on one of them dangerous modercicles.
Didn't get this part!? Stop what?

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With any new bike, remember that the tires and brakes are brand new and need to be treated as such.
Elaborate please.
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Old 05-21-2010, 09:43 AM   #39
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Facetiousness - "Stop using fairly sound reasoning"

New tires must be "broken in". They can be very slick (due to mold release compounds remaining on the tread) when new, and care must be taken when riding on them.
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Old 05-21-2010, 09:55 AM   #40
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Originally Posted by SnakeBite View Post
Didn't get this part!? Stop what?
He's just saying stop using logic before you start riding. Probably expounding on the stereotype that all riders (especially of crotch rocket-type bikes) are knuckleheads.


Quote:
Originally Posted by SnakeBite
Elaborate please.
He just means that new tires will be relatively slick, and new brakes won't stick quite as well. The brake issue might not really be a big deal, but I've heard new tires can be oddly slick until they get scuffed up. A lot of people even recommend just going at them with sandpaper before even mounting them.

I can't find it, but I saw a youtube video once of a guy pulling off after mounting brand new tires, and almost randomly lowsiding at like 5MPH. It looked very strange, heh.


And yeah, the reasons you listed for going new are indeed very valid, especially the part about finding a used 08+ 250R taking a long time. Around this time of year, it would almost be impossible, heh. Also, if you decide to sell it, also try to sell it around this time of year, as it will be easiest to sell and you will get the most about of money for it. I also did not realize you would be taking a loan out even for a cheaper used bike, so yeah that definitely goes to leveling the playing field.

Let us know what you end up going with! And take some pics .

Oh, and be sure to set aside money for gear, alarms, locks, etc etc! I am cheap as hell (I bought my helmet on sale for $40, haha), and I've already spent over 400 on gear, and I still haven't bought a bike lock (though I might actually just make a rigid lock out of some scrap steel I've got to lock it to my apartment building), and some lower-body protection, so I'll probably be around $700 within the next few weeks, not including more pants, jackets, gloves, etc that I'll be collecting in the future.
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