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Old 04-01-2010, 06:40 PM   #11
jeff10236
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Originally Posted by trenttheuncatchable View Post
If you are taking the MSF BRC, you really don't need to practice beforehand, especially if you already know how to drive stick-shift. You will get two days worth of riding experience (well, most of the actual riding will be on the second day).
Hmm, looking at the hours of the course, I think I'll probably be OK.

The MSF Basic Rider course at one local community college includes 3.5 hours of classroom time for two nights, then 6 hours on Saturday and 7 hours on Sunday on the range. At another local community college it is 3 hours and 15 minutes of classroom time for two nights, 5 hours on the bike on Saturday and 8 hours on Sunday.

I'm taking the Riders Edge class at the local HD dealer. It is 3 hours of classroom time for two nights, then 9 hours of range time on the bike both Saturday and Sunday. So, I'll be getting 5 more hours of riding time with this class than the MSF course- I assume there will be more or less an equal amount of break time in all of these classes.

So, I'll already have a lot of extra practice time v. the regular MSF course.

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Originally Posted by A Star Ride View Post
I'd say practice all you can but only after a lesson or at least small supervision & correction from someone in the know. Also I recommend getting your feet on the pegs asap & keeping them there. Moving your feet around will alter the balance of the bike unnecessarily. It's natural for a new rider to want to plant a foot to catch his self & the bike from going down, fact is if the bike is moving your foot will grab the street & the rest of you & the bike keep moving, your guranteed to meet the asphalt.
Good tip, I'll keep that in mind (btw- what I envisioned before was when only going 2-4MPH, but I'll try to keep my feet on the pegs or boards until I'm ready to come to a complete stop).


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Good luck, also there are alot of Youtube videos, don't get caught up in the stunts, crashes, etc but theres a channel on there where a guy narrates his every action on the controls & explains when & why everything he does (but he is on the "wrong" side of the road, but is english), he is a great rider, but more agressive then necessary if you can find him.
I saw one, Capt. Crash (or something like that) who had some interesting looking instructional vids (like 5 min on using the clutch on one of them).

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Old 04-01-2010, 08:37 PM   #12
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Originally Posted by jeff10236 View Post
Hmm, looking at the hours of the course, I think I'll probably be OK.

The MSF Basic Rider course at one local community college includes 3.5 hours of classroom time for two nights, then 6 hours on Saturday and 7 hours on Sunday on the range. At another local community college it is 3 hours and 15 minutes of classroom time for two nights, 5 hours on the bike on Saturday and 8 hours on Sunday.

I'm taking the Riders Edge class at the local HD dealer. It is 3 hours of classroom time for two nights, then 9 hours of range time on the bike both Saturday and Sunday. So, I'll be getting 5 more hours of riding time with this class than the MSF course- I assume there will be more or less an equal amount of break time in all of these classes.

So, I'll already have a lot of extra practice time v. the regular MSF course.


Good tip, I'll keep that in mind (btw- what I envisioned before was when only going 2-4MPH, but I'll try to keep my feet on the pegs or boards until I'm ready to come to a complete stop).




I saw one, Capt. Crash (or something like that) who had some interesting looking instructional vids (like 5 min on using the clutch on one of them).
Cap'n Crash Idaho is a MO Semi-Regular - and heartily Endorsed by The_AirHawk.

He has earned the "You'll learn something by watching him in spite of yourself" footstomp of approval. (Thump, Thump!)
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Old 04-01-2010, 09:43 PM   #13
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Ken sounds like my Wife. Told her to put it in first and go to the corner and come back. 4 gears later she was 5 blocks down the road, hung a right and vanished. After hopping on my K, I found her a couple blocks further away pushing the bike. Being that it was a '69 2 cyl 125 two smoke yamaha that I barely had running she killed it at the stop and forgot to take it out of gear when she kick started it. It fired and took off ghost riding straight for a parked car, luckily it fell over as the tire slid under the car. Broken clutch lever and a bent shifter was much better than caved in car door.
Thats funny, wrecked the bike starting it LOL
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Old 04-02-2010, 09:21 AM   #14
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"Dad had a friend die in high school on a bike and he is militantly against them (I'll be 40 this summer and he still goes ballistic when I talk about getting one). "

Good thing Dad didn't have anyone he knew die in a car.
Excellent point and one I bring up myself every time some dipsh*t gives me the motorcycles are dangerous blather. In fact the last clown that gave me that friend of a cousin who knew some guy got killed etc story I just said "oh yeah I knew him, he was a real ass hole, probably had it coming".....

shut them up pretty quick
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Old 04-02-2010, 11:48 AM   #15
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Excellent point and one I bring up myself every time some dipsh*t gives me the motorcycles are dangerous blather. In fact the last clown that gave me that friend of a cousin who knew some guy got killed etc story I just said "oh yeah I knew him, he was a real ass hole, probably had it coming".....

shut them up pretty quick
Nothing in life is without risk. I have had friends get hit by cars while crossing the street as pedestrians. No one is about to stop crossing streets.

It is about risk management and going with a level of risk you are comfortable with. For some, it means only doing those things that can be dangerous that must be done, and for others we may take on additional risks for various reasons (fun, challenge, whatever).

For my dad, he is closer to the first group. Driving a car is OK because you have to get places. He doesn't want to go to a truck with more protection because one of his values is "protecting the environment" so he drives his 10 year old Taurus 6000miles a year to blend safety with environmental awareness (a newer car, esp. a hybrid is better for the environment when run, but not having the impact on the environment of disposal of one and building another is even better). My mom has a 6 year old 4cyl Accord- safe (midsized sedan) and near 30MPG on the highway. Their next car is probably a midsized (safety) hybrid (environment). So, even for my parents, there are compromises on safety they are willing to make for their other values (i.e. a midsized car, preferably with good mileage, is safe enough instead of a safer, bigger truck with poor mileage and increased greenhouse emissions).

For me, I'm willing to take on additional risks. When I signed up for the Army (a risk in itself I suppose, but serving the country was worth it to me) I signed up for the Airborne instead of staying safer on the ground. Sure, jumping out of planes is more dangerous than not, but I figured it wasn't overly dangerous, it would be fun, and it would surround me with some of the best soldiers out there if something happened. I drive a safe car (a BMW) but want a motorcycle. I figure, it is indeed more dangerous, but the risks can be managed (leathers, CE armor, FF helmet, drive defensively) and the fun (and great MPG) makes the risk worth it (much more style than a hybrid, more fun than my BMW, yet hybrid or better mileage). I also camp (minor risk from wild animals or some people), I want to get into hiking (fall and break something in the middle of nowhere and you can be SOL), I canoe, target shoot (very minor risk of accidental/negligent discharge, even more minor risk of squib shot or overloaded shot blowing your gun up), and sometimes even load my own ammo (cheaper and better accuracy, but with increased risk of blowing your gun up in your hand). Unlike my dad, there are times that I consider an increased risk to be worthwhile.

I figure just be careful, be aware of the risks, don't be reckless, and most likely things will work out OK.

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Old 04-02-2010, 12:54 PM   #16
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I consider myself to be fairly risk-averse, or at least risk-aware, though I suspect many who know me might disagree. I don't believe that just because one engages in activities considered dangerous that they are unaware of the potential consequences - in general it's often quite the opposite. But I don't need to convince anyone here of that.

When I decided to start riding (which was as soon as I had the money to buy a bike) I bought a bike before I took the MSF course. This was only due to course availability and the fact that I found a bike I thought would be a good first bike (15 year old Seca II) for a good price. I got my learner's permit, had the bike delivered, then proceeded to teach myself to ride on neighborhood streets. I knew how to drive a stick and ride bicycles as well. At first, I thought 6th was 1st and wondered why the bike was geared so high. Figured that one out pretty quick. But I learned and became confident enough to ride on roads, but probably shouldn't have. Got my license with the help of a friend who escorted me to the MVA and eventually took the MSF course as soon as I could.

I probably got lucky, but obviously it can be done, and done safely. On the other hand, I tried to teach my friend how to ride on my SV650 and he nearly looped it. This was with explicit instructions to close the throttle and pull the clutch in if you even felt uncomfortable or got into trouble. Not everyone has it in them...make sure someone knows where you are / what you're doing - just in case.
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Old 04-02-2010, 02:49 PM   #17
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jeff,

With your EEEE feet, I'd advise against dragging them. You'll burn up the clutch.

And paddling will make too much noise.
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Old 04-02-2010, 06:05 PM   #18
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jeff,

With your EEEE feet, I'd advise against dragging them. You'll burn up the clutch.

And paddling will make too much noise.
Funny ...they aren't clown feet (well barely ).
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Old 04-03-2010, 11:45 AM   #19
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So I bought my bike yesterday. I went new (if people want to discuss that, I can start a new thread). With the posts here and the number of hours in the Harley Riders Edge course (and how the salesman and parts guy at the Suzuki dealer couldn't say enough about how the course was better than the regular MSF) I'm feeling more confident that I probably won't need a lot of extra parking lot practice before I start riding (of course I'll still be a raw beginner but I doubt I'll need hours of slow speed parking lot practice, maybe 30min or so to get used to my bike before I hit the road). So, since I won't get my license until a month from today (I finish the class Sunday, May 2nd and will get my license on May 3rd) they'll hold on to it for a few weeks for me. They will hold it for about 3 weeks so it isn't sitting in my apartment garage teasing and tempting me for a month, then I'll have them bring it about a week before I get my license so it is ready to go for that first ride when I come home on the 3rd with my motorcycle license.

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Old 04-03-2010, 01:48 PM   #20
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So I bought my bike yesterday. I went new (if people want to discuss that, I can start a new thread).
Did I miss it. What did you end up getting? No matter. Be safe, ride safe.
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